Traditional recipes

This Simple Trick Turns Any Fruit Into Super-Sweet Dessert

This Simple Trick Turns Any Fruit Into Super-Sweet Dessert


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Healthy sweets aren’t easy to come by — and when you do find a healthy dessert recipe you actually want to eat, it’s often really complicated. If you’re anything like us, it’s likely you’re just going to grab a cookie and call it a day.

Well, there’s a simpler solution to your diet-friendly dessert woes. And no, we aren’t here to tell you that “fruit is nature’s candy” or whatever other blatant lies you’ve heard again and again from the usual diet advocates.

Fruit isn’t candy, stevia isn’t sugar, and your cravings for sweets didn’t “disappear” on that cleanse. You’re probably tired and frustrated with being repeatedly disappointed in your hankering for sweets. I have upsetting news for you: It’s not going away.

But here’s something you can rely on to help satisfy your cravings the healthy way: Fruit gets SO much sweeter when you cook it.

No, fruit isn’t nature’s candy. But if you’re trying to sweeten an otherwise-bland healthy pancake or a boring bowl of oatmeal, cooking your fruit before adding it can seriously help to jack up the flavor.

For example: Have you ever tried frying a banana? It caramelizes and gets so syrupy-sweet. The brown, gooey banana you’re left with after searing it on the stove makes a fantastic healthy pancake topper — your breakfast will still taste super sweet without wrecking your low-sugar stack with pools of maple syrup.

What about baking a pear? This one’s a bit more popular of a practice, but the result is the same. Cook the fruit and it gets way better.

Sautéing apples. Grilling a peach. When you simmer frozen raspberries in a small saucepan, it makes low-sugar raspberry jam.

You can really cook all your fruit and the result will always taste sweeter.

So next time you’re craving sugar, instead of giving up on your health goals and setting yourself loose on a bag of candy, sauté a banana and drizzle it with some peanut butter. The resulting treat is so delectable and so healthy that both your cravings and your diet will leave satisfied.


How To Make a Fruit Crumble with Any Kind of Fruit

Crumble is a wildly simple fruit recipe topped with a crisp, buttery crumb topping that turns any fruit into a stunning dessert. It’s perfectly suited for summer brunches and backyard BBQs alike. Making crumble is so easy that you barely need a recipe. Once you know the basics of making a crumble topping and how to prepare the fruit filling, you can choose any fruit or combination of fruit from any season. Here are the three essential steps you need to know for making a classic fruit crumble.

What Is a Crumble?

Crumbles are part of a family of fruit desserts that include crisps and crumbles. Crumble has a streusel-meets-pastry topping that is both crisp and craggle-filled, while the underside is softened by the fruit juices. Crumbles are more fruit-forward than their more elegant pie and tart cousins. I typically add a minimal amount of sugar or spices and let the fruit speak for itself.

Here are the three steps you need to know for any kind of fruit crumble.

  • Selecting and preparing the fruit
  • Making the crumble topping
  • Baking and serving the crumble

Selecting and Preparing Fruit for Crumble

I also don’t usually bother measuring or weighing the fruit I buy for a crumble. When shopping, I imagine my baking dish and then grab as much fruit as I think I’ll need to fill it. As a general rule, 1 1/2 pounds of fruit will fill most baking dishes. Back in my kitchen, I slice the fruit directly into the pan and keep going until it’s filled. If I don’t have enough fruit, I either settle for a fruit-to-crumble ratio that’s closer to 50/50 (not a bad thing) or add a handful of blueberries or another fruit in my bag to round it out.

Making Crumble Topping

Crumb topping can be as simple as flour and sugar thickened with butter, but two small upgrades make for a tastier crumble topping. First, adding a teaspoon of baking powder to the flour mixture makes the crumble topping more tender. Second, using cold butter and working it into the flour mixture makes for a pastry-like topping reminiscent of pie crust.

Pro tip: Crumble topping freezes incredibly well and can be kept on hand for crumble anytime.

Baking Fruit Crumble

Fruit crumble’s baking success depends on two things: a hot oven and a bubbling filling. Crumble requires more baking time than you think the top should be brown and the filling should be bubbling. In order to thicken properly, the cornstarch in the filling must boil, which is why bubbling is a key indicator for doneness. If you’re concerned about bubbling over in the oven, you can lay a piece of foil or a baking sheet on the rack under the baking dish.

Serving Fruit Crumble

And don’t worry if you see juices puddling at the bottom of the dish after you start to serve — this is normal, especially if you couldn’t help diving into the crumble while it was still warm and not quite fully set. A spoonful of these syrupy juices is perfect drizzled over the scoop of ice cream you will inevitably want with your crumble.


How To Make a Fruit Crumble with Any Kind of Fruit

Crumble is a wildly simple fruit recipe topped with a crisp, buttery crumb topping that turns any fruit into a stunning dessert. It’s perfectly suited for summer brunches and backyard BBQs alike. Making crumble is so easy that you barely need a recipe. Once you know the basics of making a crumble topping and how to prepare the fruit filling, you can choose any fruit or combination of fruit from any season. Here are the three essential steps you need to know for making a classic fruit crumble.

What Is a Crumble?

Crumbles are part of a family of fruit desserts that include crisps and crumbles. Crumble has a streusel-meets-pastry topping that is both crisp and craggle-filled, while the underside is softened by the fruit juices. Crumbles are more fruit-forward than their more elegant pie and tart cousins. I typically add a minimal amount of sugar or spices and let the fruit speak for itself.

Here are the three steps you need to know for any kind of fruit crumble.

  • Selecting and preparing the fruit
  • Making the crumble topping
  • Baking and serving the crumble

Selecting and Preparing Fruit for Crumble

I also don’t usually bother measuring or weighing the fruit I buy for a crumble. When shopping, I imagine my baking dish and then grab as much fruit as I think I’ll need to fill it. As a general rule, 1 1/2 pounds of fruit will fill most baking dishes. Back in my kitchen, I slice the fruit directly into the pan and keep going until it’s filled. If I don’t have enough fruit, I either settle for a fruit-to-crumble ratio that’s closer to 50/50 (not a bad thing) or add a handful of blueberries or another fruit in my bag to round it out.

Making Crumble Topping

Crumb topping can be as simple as flour and sugar thickened with butter, but two small upgrades make for a tastier crumble topping. First, adding a teaspoon of baking powder to the flour mixture makes the crumble topping more tender. Second, using cold butter and working it into the flour mixture makes for a pastry-like topping reminiscent of pie crust.

Pro tip: Crumble topping freezes incredibly well and can be kept on hand for crumble anytime.

Baking Fruit Crumble

Fruit crumble’s baking success depends on two things: a hot oven and a bubbling filling. Crumble requires more baking time than you think the top should be brown and the filling should be bubbling. In order to thicken properly, the cornstarch in the filling must boil, which is why bubbling is a key indicator for doneness. If you’re concerned about bubbling over in the oven, you can lay a piece of foil or a baking sheet on the rack under the baking dish.

Serving Fruit Crumble

And don’t worry if you see juices puddling at the bottom of the dish after you start to serve — this is normal, especially if you couldn’t help diving into the crumble while it was still warm and not quite fully set. A spoonful of these syrupy juices is perfect drizzled over the scoop of ice cream you will inevitably want with your crumble.


How To Make a Fruit Crumble with Any Kind of Fruit

Crumble is a wildly simple fruit recipe topped with a crisp, buttery crumb topping that turns any fruit into a stunning dessert. It’s perfectly suited for summer brunches and backyard BBQs alike. Making crumble is so easy that you barely need a recipe. Once you know the basics of making a crumble topping and how to prepare the fruit filling, you can choose any fruit or combination of fruit from any season. Here are the three essential steps you need to know for making a classic fruit crumble.

What Is a Crumble?

Crumbles are part of a family of fruit desserts that include crisps and crumbles. Crumble has a streusel-meets-pastry topping that is both crisp and craggle-filled, while the underside is softened by the fruit juices. Crumbles are more fruit-forward than their more elegant pie and tart cousins. I typically add a minimal amount of sugar or spices and let the fruit speak for itself.

Here are the three steps you need to know for any kind of fruit crumble.

  • Selecting and preparing the fruit
  • Making the crumble topping
  • Baking and serving the crumble

Selecting and Preparing Fruit for Crumble

I also don’t usually bother measuring or weighing the fruit I buy for a crumble. When shopping, I imagine my baking dish and then grab as much fruit as I think I’ll need to fill it. As a general rule, 1 1/2 pounds of fruit will fill most baking dishes. Back in my kitchen, I slice the fruit directly into the pan and keep going until it’s filled. If I don’t have enough fruit, I either settle for a fruit-to-crumble ratio that’s closer to 50/50 (not a bad thing) or add a handful of blueberries or another fruit in my bag to round it out.

Making Crumble Topping

Crumb topping can be as simple as flour and sugar thickened with butter, but two small upgrades make for a tastier crumble topping. First, adding a teaspoon of baking powder to the flour mixture makes the crumble topping more tender. Second, using cold butter and working it into the flour mixture makes for a pastry-like topping reminiscent of pie crust.

Pro tip: Crumble topping freezes incredibly well and can be kept on hand for crumble anytime.

Baking Fruit Crumble

Fruit crumble’s baking success depends on two things: a hot oven and a bubbling filling. Crumble requires more baking time than you think the top should be brown and the filling should be bubbling. In order to thicken properly, the cornstarch in the filling must boil, which is why bubbling is a key indicator for doneness. If you’re concerned about bubbling over in the oven, you can lay a piece of foil or a baking sheet on the rack under the baking dish.

Serving Fruit Crumble

And don’t worry if you see juices puddling at the bottom of the dish after you start to serve — this is normal, especially if you couldn’t help diving into the crumble while it was still warm and not quite fully set. A spoonful of these syrupy juices is perfect drizzled over the scoop of ice cream you will inevitably want with your crumble.


How To Make a Fruit Crumble with Any Kind of Fruit

Crumble is a wildly simple fruit recipe topped with a crisp, buttery crumb topping that turns any fruit into a stunning dessert. It’s perfectly suited for summer brunches and backyard BBQs alike. Making crumble is so easy that you barely need a recipe. Once you know the basics of making a crumble topping and how to prepare the fruit filling, you can choose any fruit or combination of fruit from any season. Here are the three essential steps you need to know for making a classic fruit crumble.

What Is a Crumble?

Crumbles are part of a family of fruit desserts that include crisps and crumbles. Crumble has a streusel-meets-pastry topping that is both crisp and craggle-filled, while the underside is softened by the fruit juices. Crumbles are more fruit-forward than their more elegant pie and tart cousins. I typically add a minimal amount of sugar or spices and let the fruit speak for itself.

Here are the three steps you need to know for any kind of fruit crumble.

  • Selecting and preparing the fruit
  • Making the crumble topping
  • Baking and serving the crumble

Selecting and Preparing Fruit for Crumble

I also don’t usually bother measuring or weighing the fruit I buy for a crumble. When shopping, I imagine my baking dish and then grab as much fruit as I think I’ll need to fill it. As a general rule, 1 1/2 pounds of fruit will fill most baking dishes. Back in my kitchen, I slice the fruit directly into the pan and keep going until it’s filled. If I don’t have enough fruit, I either settle for a fruit-to-crumble ratio that’s closer to 50/50 (not a bad thing) or add a handful of blueberries or another fruit in my bag to round it out.

Making Crumble Topping

Crumb topping can be as simple as flour and sugar thickened with butter, but two small upgrades make for a tastier crumble topping. First, adding a teaspoon of baking powder to the flour mixture makes the crumble topping more tender. Second, using cold butter and working it into the flour mixture makes for a pastry-like topping reminiscent of pie crust.

Pro tip: Crumble topping freezes incredibly well and can be kept on hand for crumble anytime.

Baking Fruit Crumble

Fruit crumble’s baking success depends on two things: a hot oven and a bubbling filling. Crumble requires more baking time than you think the top should be brown and the filling should be bubbling. In order to thicken properly, the cornstarch in the filling must boil, which is why bubbling is a key indicator for doneness. If you’re concerned about bubbling over in the oven, you can lay a piece of foil or a baking sheet on the rack under the baking dish.

Serving Fruit Crumble

And don’t worry if you see juices puddling at the bottom of the dish after you start to serve — this is normal, especially if you couldn’t help diving into the crumble while it was still warm and not quite fully set. A spoonful of these syrupy juices is perfect drizzled over the scoop of ice cream you will inevitably want with your crumble.


How To Make a Fruit Crumble with Any Kind of Fruit

Crumble is a wildly simple fruit recipe topped with a crisp, buttery crumb topping that turns any fruit into a stunning dessert. It’s perfectly suited for summer brunches and backyard BBQs alike. Making crumble is so easy that you barely need a recipe. Once you know the basics of making a crumble topping and how to prepare the fruit filling, you can choose any fruit or combination of fruit from any season. Here are the three essential steps you need to know for making a classic fruit crumble.

What Is a Crumble?

Crumbles are part of a family of fruit desserts that include crisps and crumbles. Crumble has a streusel-meets-pastry topping that is both crisp and craggle-filled, while the underside is softened by the fruit juices. Crumbles are more fruit-forward than their more elegant pie and tart cousins. I typically add a minimal amount of sugar or spices and let the fruit speak for itself.

Here are the three steps you need to know for any kind of fruit crumble.

  • Selecting and preparing the fruit
  • Making the crumble topping
  • Baking and serving the crumble

Selecting and Preparing Fruit for Crumble

I also don’t usually bother measuring or weighing the fruit I buy for a crumble. When shopping, I imagine my baking dish and then grab as much fruit as I think I’ll need to fill it. As a general rule, 1 1/2 pounds of fruit will fill most baking dishes. Back in my kitchen, I slice the fruit directly into the pan and keep going until it’s filled. If I don’t have enough fruit, I either settle for a fruit-to-crumble ratio that’s closer to 50/50 (not a bad thing) or add a handful of blueberries or another fruit in my bag to round it out.

Making Crumble Topping

Crumb topping can be as simple as flour and sugar thickened with butter, but two small upgrades make for a tastier crumble topping. First, adding a teaspoon of baking powder to the flour mixture makes the crumble topping more tender. Second, using cold butter and working it into the flour mixture makes for a pastry-like topping reminiscent of pie crust.

Pro tip: Crumble topping freezes incredibly well and can be kept on hand for crumble anytime.

Baking Fruit Crumble

Fruit crumble’s baking success depends on two things: a hot oven and a bubbling filling. Crumble requires more baking time than you think the top should be brown and the filling should be bubbling. In order to thicken properly, the cornstarch in the filling must boil, which is why bubbling is a key indicator for doneness. If you’re concerned about bubbling over in the oven, you can lay a piece of foil or a baking sheet on the rack under the baking dish.

Serving Fruit Crumble

And don’t worry if you see juices puddling at the bottom of the dish after you start to serve — this is normal, especially if you couldn’t help diving into the crumble while it was still warm and not quite fully set. A spoonful of these syrupy juices is perfect drizzled over the scoop of ice cream you will inevitably want with your crumble.


How To Make a Fruit Crumble with Any Kind of Fruit

Crumble is a wildly simple fruit recipe topped with a crisp, buttery crumb topping that turns any fruit into a stunning dessert. It’s perfectly suited for summer brunches and backyard BBQs alike. Making crumble is so easy that you barely need a recipe. Once you know the basics of making a crumble topping and how to prepare the fruit filling, you can choose any fruit or combination of fruit from any season. Here are the three essential steps you need to know for making a classic fruit crumble.

What Is a Crumble?

Crumbles are part of a family of fruit desserts that include crisps and crumbles. Crumble has a streusel-meets-pastry topping that is both crisp and craggle-filled, while the underside is softened by the fruit juices. Crumbles are more fruit-forward than their more elegant pie and tart cousins. I typically add a minimal amount of sugar or spices and let the fruit speak for itself.

Here are the three steps you need to know for any kind of fruit crumble.

  • Selecting and preparing the fruit
  • Making the crumble topping
  • Baking and serving the crumble

Selecting and Preparing Fruit for Crumble

I also don’t usually bother measuring or weighing the fruit I buy for a crumble. When shopping, I imagine my baking dish and then grab as much fruit as I think I’ll need to fill it. As a general rule, 1 1/2 pounds of fruit will fill most baking dishes. Back in my kitchen, I slice the fruit directly into the pan and keep going until it’s filled. If I don’t have enough fruit, I either settle for a fruit-to-crumble ratio that’s closer to 50/50 (not a bad thing) or add a handful of blueberries or another fruit in my bag to round it out.

Making Crumble Topping

Crumb topping can be as simple as flour and sugar thickened with butter, but two small upgrades make for a tastier crumble topping. First, adding a teaspoon of baking powder to the flour mixture makes the crumble topping more tender. Second, using cold butter and working it into the flour mixture makes for a pastry-like topping reminiscent of pie crust.

Pro tip: Crumble topping freezes incredibly well and can be kept on hand for crumble anytime.

Baking Fruit Crumble

Fruit crumble’s baking success depends on two things: a hot oven and a bubbling filling. Crumble requires more baking time than you think the top should be brown and the filling should be bubbling. In order to thicken properly, the cornstarch in the filling must boil, which is why bubbling is a key indicator for doneness. If you’re concerned about bubbling over in the oven, you can lay a piece of foil or a baking sheet on the rack under the baking dish.

Serving Fruit Crumble

And don’t worry if you see juices puddling at the bottom of the dish after you start to serve — this is normal, especially if you couldn’t help diving into the crumble while it was still warm and not quite fully set. A spoonful of these syrupy juices is perfect drizzled over the scoop of ice cream you will inevitably want with your crumble.


How To Make a Fruit Crumble with Any Kind of Fruit

Crumble is a wildly simple fruit recipe topped with a crisp, buttery crumb topping that turns any fruit into a stunning dessert. It’s perfectly suited for summer brunches and backyard BBQs alike. Making crumble is so easy that you barely need a recipe. Once you know the basics of making a crumble topping and how to prepare the fruit filling, you can choose any fruit or combination of fruit from any season. Here are the three essential steps you need to know for making a classic fruit crumble.

What Is a Crumble?

Crumbles are part of a family of fruit desserts that include crisps and crumbles. Crumble has a streusel-meets-pastry topping that is both crisp and craggle-filled, while the underside is softened by the fruit juices. Crumbles are more fruit-forward than their more elegant pie and tart cousins. I typically add a minimal amount of sugar or spices and let the fruit speak for itself.

Here are the three steps you need to know for any kind of fruit crumble.

  • Selecting and preparing the fruit
  • Making the crumble topping
  • Baking and serving the crumble

Selecting and Preparing Fruit for Crumble

I also don’t usually bother measuring or weighing the fruit I buy for a crumble. When shopping, I imagine my baking dish and then grab as much fruit as I think I’ll need to fill it. As a general rule, 1 1/2 pounds of fruit will fill most baking dishes. Back in my kitchen, I slice the fruit directly into the pan and keep going until it’s filled. If I don’t have enough fruit, I either settle for a fruit-to-crumble ratio that’s closer to 50/50 (not a bad thing) or add a handful of blueberries or another fruit in my bag to round it out.

Making Crumble Topping

Crumb topping can be as simple as flour and sugar thickened with butter, but two small upgrades make for a tastier crumble topping. First, adding a teaspoon of baking powder to the flour mixture makes the crumble topping more tender. Second, using cold butter and working it into the flour mixture makes for a pastry-like topping reminiscent of pie crust.

Pro tip: Crumble topping freezes incredibly well and can be kept on hand for crumble anytime.

Baking Fruit Crumble

Fruit crumble’s baking success depends on two things: a hot oven and a bubbling filling. Crumble requires more baking time than you think the top should be brown and the filling should be bubbling. In order to thicken properly, the cornstarch in the filling must boil, which is why bubbling is a key indicator for doneness. If you’re concerned about bubbling over in the oven, you can lay a piece of foil or a baking sheet on the rack under the baking dish.

Serving Fruit Crumble

And don’t worry if you see juices puddling at the bottom of the dish after you start to serve — this is normal, especially if you couldn’t help diving into the crumble while it was still warm and not quite fully set. A spoonful of these syrupy juices is perfect drizzled over the scoop of ice cream you will inevitably want with your crumble.


How To Make a Fruit Crumble with Any Kind of Fruit

Crumble is a wildly simple fruit recipe topped with a crisp, buttery crumb topping that turns any fruit into a stunning dessert. It’s perfectly suited for summer brunches and backyard BBQs alike. Making crumble is so easy that you barely need a recipe. Once you know the basics of making a crumble topping and how to prepare the fruit filling, you can choose any fruit or combination of fruit from any season. Here are the three essential steps you need to know for making a classic fruit crumble.

What Is a Crumble?

Crumbles are part of a family of fruit desserts that include crisps and crumbles. Crumble has a streusel-meets-pastry topping that is both crisp and craggle-filled, while the underside is softened by the fruit juices. Crumbles are more fruit-forward than their more elegant pie and tart cousins. I typically add a minimal amount of sugar or spices and let the fruit speak for itself.

Here are the three steps you need to know for any kind of fruit crumble.

  • Selecting and preparing the fruit
  • Making the crumble topping
  • Baking and serving the crumble

Selecting and Preparing Fruit for Crumble

I also don’t usually bother measuring or weighing the fruit I buy for a crumble. When shopping, I imagine my baking dish and then grab as much fruit as I think I’ll need to fill it. As a general rule, 1 1/2 pounds of fruit will fill most baking dishes. Back in my kitchen, I slice the fruit directly into the pan and keep going until it’s filled. If I don’t have enough fruit, I either settle for a fruit-to-crumble ratio that’s closer to 50/50 (not a bad thing) or add a handful of blueberries or another fruit in my bag to round it out.

Making Crumble Topping

Crumb topping can be as simple as flour and sugar thickened with butter, but two small upgrades make for a tastier crumble topping. First, adding a teaspoon of baking powder to the flour mixture makes the crumble topping more tender. Second, using cold butter and working it into the flour mixture makes for a pastry-like topping reminiscent of pie crust.

Pro tip: Crumble topping freezes incredibly well and can be kept on hand for crumble anytime.

Baking Fruit Crumble

Fruit crumble’s baking success depends on two things: a hot oven and a bubbling filling. Crumble requires more baking time than you think the top should be brown and the filling should be bubbling. In order to thicken properly, the cornstarch in the filling must boil, which is why bubbling is a key indicator for doneness. If you’re concerned about bubbling over in the oven, you can lay a piece of foil or a baking sheet on the rack under the baking dish.

Serving Fruit Crumble

And don’t worry if you see juices puddling at the bottom of the dish after you start to serve — this is normal, especially if you couldn’t help diving into the crumble while it was still warm and not quite fully set. A spoonful of these syrupy juices is perfect drizzled over the scoop of ice cream you will inevitably want with your crumble.


How To Make a Fruit Crumble with Any Kind of Fruit

Crumble is a wildly simple fruit recipe topped with a crisp, buttery crumb topping that turns any fruit into a stunning dessert. It’s perfectly suited for summer brunches and backyard BBQs alike. Making crumble is so easy that you barely need a recipe. Once you know the basics of making a crumble topping and how to prepare the fruit filling, you can choose any fruit or combination of fruit from any season. Here are the three essential steps you need to know for making a classic fruit crumble.

What Is a Crumble?

Crumbles are part of a family of fruit desserts that include crisps and crumbles. Crumble has a streusel-meets-pastry topping that is both crisp and craggle-filled, while the underside is softened by the fruit juices. Crumbles are more fruit-forward than their more elegant pie and tart cousins. I typically add a minimal amount of sugar or spices and let the fruit speak for itself.

Here are the three steps you need to know for any kind of fruit crumble.

  • Selecting and preparing the fruit
  • Making the crumble topping
  • Baking and serving the crumble

Selecting and Preparing Fruit for Crumble

I also don’t usually bother measuring or weighing the fruit I buy for a crumble. When shopping, I imagine my baking dish and then grab as much fruit as I think I’ll need to fill it. As a general rule, 1 1/2 pounds of fruit will fill most baking dishes. Back in my kitchen, I slice the fruit directly into the pan and keep going until it’s filled. If I don’t have enough fruit, I either settle for a fruit-to-crumble ratio that’s closer to 50/50 (not a bad thing) or add a handful of blueberries or another fruit in my bag to round it out.

Making Crumble Topping

Crumb topping can be as simple as flour and sugar thickened with butter, but two small upgrades make for a tastier crumble topping. First, adding a teaspoon of baking powder to the flour mixture makes the crumble topping more tender. Second, using cold butter and working it into the flour mixture makes for a pastry-like topping reminiscent of pie crust.

Pro tip: Crumble topping freezes incredibly well and can be kept on hand for crumble anytime.

Baking Fruit Crumble

Fruit crumble’s baking success depends on two things: a hot oven and a bubbling filling. Crumble requires more baking time than you think the top should be brown and the filling should be bubbling. In order to thicken properly, the cornstarch in the filling must boil, which is why bubbling is a key indicator for doneness. If you’re concerned about bubbling over in the oven, you can lay a piece of foil or a baking sheet on the rack under the baking dish.

Serving Fruit Crumble

And don’t worry if you see juices puddling at the bottom of the dish after you start to serve — this is normal, especially if you couldn’t help diving into the crumble while it was still warm and not quite fully set. A spoonful of these syrupy juices is perfect drizzled over the scoop of ice cream you will inevitably want with your crumble.


How To Make a Fruit Crumble with Any Kind of Fruit

Crumble is a wildly simple fruit recipe topped with a crisp, buttery crumb topping that turns any fruit into a stunning dessert. It’s perfectly suited for summer brunches and backyard BBQs alike. Making crumble is so easy that you barely need a recipe. Once you know the basics of making a crumble topping and how to prepare the fruit filling, you can choose any fruit or combination of fruit from any season. Here are the three essential steps you need to know for making a classic fruit crumble.

What Is a Crumble?

Crumbles are part of a family of fruit desserts that include crisps and crumbles. Crumble has a streusel-meets-pastry topping that is both crisp and craggle-filled, while the underside is softened by the fruit juices. Crumbles are more fruit-forward than their more elegant pie and tart cousins. I typically add a minimal amount of sugar or spices and let the fruit speak for itself.

Here are the three steps you need to know for any kind of fruit crumble.

  • Selecting and preparing the fruit
  • Making the crumble topping
  • Baking and serving the crumble

Selecting and Preparing Fruit for Crumble

I also don’t usually bother measuring or weighing the fruit I buy for a crumble. When shopping, I imagine my baking dish and then grab as much fruit as I think I’ll need to fill it. As a general rule, 1 1/2 pounds of fruit will fill most baking dishes. Back in my kitchen, I slice the fruit directly into the pan and keep going until it’s filled. If I don’t have enough fruit, I either settle for a fruit-to-crumble ratio that’s closer to 50/50 (not a bad thing) or add a handful of blueberries or another fruit in my bag to round it out.

Making Crumble Topping

Crumb topping can be as simple as flour and sugar thickened with butter, but two small upgrades make for a tastier crumble topping. First, adding a teaspoon of baking powder to the flour mixture makes the crumble topping more tender. Second, using cold butter and working it into the flour mixture makes for a pastry-like topping reminiscent of pie crust.

Pro tip: Crumble topping freezes incredibly well and can be kept on hand for crumble anytime.

Baking Fruit Crumble

Fruit crumble’s baking success depends on two things: a hot oven and a bubbling filling. Crumble requires more baking time than you think the top should be brown and the filling should be bubbling. In order to thicken properly, the cornstarch in the filling must boil, which is why bubbling is a key indicator for doneness. If you’re concerned about bubbling over in the oven, you can lay a piece of foil or a baking sheet on the rack under the baking dish.

Serving Fruit Crumble

And don’t worry if you see juices puddling at the bottom of the dish after you start to serve — this is normal, especially if you couldn’t help diving into the crumble while it was still warm and not quite fully set. A spoonful of these syrupy juices is perfect drizzled over the scoop of ice cream you will inevitably want with your crumble.



Comments:

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  2. Fowler

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    I can believe you :)

  4. Tutaur

    Interesting :)

  5. Ephraim

    It is a pity, that now I can not express - I hurry up on job. I will return - I will necessarily express the opinion on this question.

  6. Mami

    I also noticed this sometimes, but somehow I didn’t attach any importance to it before.

  7. Linus

    What words ... Super, great idea



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