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10 Memory Boosting Foods (Slideshow)

10 Memory Boosting Foods (Slideshow)


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These foods will help your memory

In addition to being high in Omega-3’s, certain fish also contain high levels of vitamins B6 and B12, which according to a recent study, reduce the risk of certain brain-related degenerating conditions such as Alzheimer’s.

Fish

In addition to being high in Omega-3’s, certain fish also contain high levels of vitamins B6 and B12, which according to a recent study, reduce the risk of certain brain-related degenerating conditions such as Alzheimer’s.

Avocados

Yet another reason to love this versatile fruit. Some studies have shown an emerging connection between foods high in mono-saturated fats and memory retention as you age.

Leafy Greens

Foods that are high in micro-nutrients are known improve brain function, and dark leafy vegetables such as kale or Swiss chard are particularly high in micro-nutrients.

Peanuts

Chocolate

Green Tea

Carrots

According to nutritionist Kelly Aronica, the B vitamins found in carrots, spinach, red peppers, and summer squashes help manufacture and release chemicals in the brain known as neurotransmitters.

"The nervous system relies on neurotransmitters to communicate messages within the brain, such as those that regulate mood, hunger, and sleep."

Blueberries

These delicious berries do more than make the perfect pie filling. Blueberries contain anthocyanin, which has been shown to reverse age-related declines in cognitive and motor function. They have also been found to help improve memory for all ages, which is essential for learning.

Apples

Turns out an apple a day can do more than keep the doctor away; it can improve your brain health as well. Apples contain quercetin, which appears to protect brain neurons from oxidative damage, a known cause of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases.


6 MIND Diet Recipes to Give Your Brain a Boost

You already know that what we eat can help build strong bones and muscles. But it turns out that our diet can also have a positive effect on our brains, enhancing memory and mental clarity, and even helping stave off dementia and Alzheimer&rsquos disease. Carolyn Williams, PhD, RD, author of the cookbook Meals That Heal, explains: &ldquoThe brain runs 24/7, requiring a constant supply of energy and nutrients. If it doesn&rsquot have the optimal fuel it needs, this affects its functioning and can also slowly change its structure.&rdquo

According to Williams, food can improve brain health in two major ways. First, antioxidant-rich and anti-inflammatory foods can help fight the free-radical damage and low-grade inflammation that lead to declining brain health. Second, foods that are nutrient-dense with protein, B vitamins, choline, vitamin C, iron, and zinc may support neurotransmitters, which carry messages between brain cells directing essential functions like sleep, mood, concentration, breathing, heart rate, and hunger.

So what&rsquos the best overall eating pattern to reap these benefits? Science is pointing to the MIND diet (Mediterranean-DASH Intervention for Neurodegenerative Delay)&mdashit&rsquos a combination of the classic Mediterranean diet and the hypertension-focused DASH diet. &ldquoResearch suggests even moderate adherence to the MIND diet slows brain decline and reduces the risk of Alzheimer&rsquos,&rdquo Williams says.

Cornerstone foods of the MIND diet include leafy greens, berries, nuts, olive oil, beans, whole grains, poultry, and fatty fish (and other sources of omega-3 fatty acids). The recipes featured here follow the MIND diet guidelines. What&rsquos more, they are easy to prep and big on flavor.


6 MIND Diet Recipes to Give Your Brain a Boost

You already know that what we eat can help build strong bones and muscles. But it turns out that our diet can also have a positive effect on our brains, enhancing memory and mental clarity, and even helping stave off dementia and Alzheimer&rsquos disease. Carolyn Williams, PhD, RD, author of the cookbook Meals That Heal, explains: &ldquoThe brain runs 24/7, requiring a constant supply of energy and nutrients. If it doesn&rsquot have the optimal fuel it needs, this affects its functioning and can also slowly change its structure.&rdquo

According to Williams, food can improve brain health in two major ways. First, antioxidant-rich and anti-inflammatory foods can help fight the free-radical damage and low-grade inflammation that lead to declining brain health. Second, foods that are nutrient-dense with protein, B vitamins, choline, vitamin C, iron, and zinc may support neurotransmitters, which carry messages between brain cells directing essential functions like sleep, mood, concentration, breathing, heart rate, and hunger.

So what&rsquos the best overall eating pattern to reap these benefits? Science is pointing to the MIND diet (Mediterranean-DASH Intervention for Neurodegenerative Delay)&mdashit&rsquos a combination of the classic Mediterranean diet and the hypertension-focused DASH diet. &ldquoResearch suggests even moderate adherence to the MIND diet slows brain decline and reduces the risk of Alzheimer&rsquos,&rdquo Williams says.

Cornerstone foods of the MIND diet include leafy greens, berries, nuts, olive oil, beans, whole grains, poultry, and fatty fish (and other sources of omega-3 fatty acids). The recipes featured here follow the MIND diet guidelines. What&rsquos more, they are easy to prep and big on flavor.


6 MIND Diet Recipes to Give Your Brain a Boost

You already know that what we eat can help build strong bones and muscles. But it turns out that our diet can also have a positive effect on our brains, enhancing memory and mental clarity, and even helping stave off dementia and Alzheimer&rsquos disease. Carolyn Williams, PhD, RD, author of the cookbook Meals That Heal, explains: &ldquoThe brain runs 24/7, requiring a constant supply of energy and nutrients. If it doesn&rsquot have the optimal fuel it needs, this affects its functioning and can also slowly change its structure.&rdquo

According to Williams, food can improve brain health in two major ways. First, antioxidant-rich and anti-inflammatory foods can help fight the free-radical damage and low-grade inflammation that lead to declining brain health. Second, foods that are nutrient-dense with protein, B vitamins, choline, vitamin C, iron, and zinc may support neurotransmitters, which carry messages between brain cells directing essential functions like sleep, mood, concentration, breathing, heart rate, and hunger.

So what&rsquos the best overall eating pattern to reap these benefits? Science is pointing to the MIND diet (Mediterranean-DASH Intervention for Neurodegenerative Delay)&mdashit&rsquos a combination of the classic Mediterranean diet and the hypertension-focused DASH diet. &ldquoResearch suggests even moderate adherence to the MIND diet slows brain decline and reduces the risk of Alzheimer&rsquos,&rdquo Williams says.

Cornerstone foods of the MIND diet include leafy greens, berries, nuts, olive oil, beans, whole grains, poultry, and fatty fish (and other sources of omega-3 fatty acids). The recipes featured here follow the MIND diet guidelines. What&rsquos more, they are easy to prep and big on flavor.


6 MIND Diet Recipes to Give Your Brain a Boost

You already know that what we eat can help build strong bones and muscles. But it turns out that our diet can also have a positive effect on our brains, enhancing memory and mental clarity, and even helping stave off dementia and Alzheimer&rsquos disease. Carolyn Williams, PhD, RD, author of the cookbook Meals That Heal, explains: &ldquoThe brain runs 24/7, requiring a constant supply of energy and nutrients. If it doesn&rsquot have the optimal fuel it needs, this affects its functioning and can also slowly change its structure.&rdquo

According to Williams, food can improve brain health in two major ways. First, antioxidant-rich and anti-inflammatory foods can help fight the free-radical damage and low-grade inflammation that lead to declining brain health. Second, foods that are nutrient-dense with protein, B vitamins, choline, vitamin C, iron, and zinc may support neurotransmitters, which carry messages between brain cells directing essential functions like sleep, mood, concentration, breathing, heart rate, and hunger.

So what&rsquos the best overall eating pattern to reap these benefits? Science is pointing to the MIND diet (Mediterranean-DASH Intervention for Neurodegenerative Delay)&mdashit&rsquos a combination of the classic Mediterranean diet and the hypertension-focused DASH diet. &ldquoResearch suggests even moderate adherence to the MIND diet slows brain decline and reduces the risk of Alzheimer&rsquos,&rdquo Williams says.

Cornerstone foods of the MIND diet include leafy greens, berries, nuts, olive oil, beans, whole grains, poultry, and fatty fish (and other sources of omega-3 fatty acids). The recipes featured here follow the MIND diet guidelines. What&rsquos more, they are easy to prep and big on flavor.


6 MIND Diet Recipes to Give Your Brain a Boost

You already know that what we eat can help build strong bones and muscles. But it turns out that our diet can also have a positive effect on our brains, enhancing memory and mental clarity, and even helping stave off dementia and Alzheimer&rsquos disease. Carolyn Williams, PhD, RD, author of the cookbook Meals That Heal, explains: &ldquoThe brain runs 24/7, requiring a constant supply of energy and nutrients. If it doesn&rsquot have the optimal fuel it needs, this affects its functioning and can also slowly change its structure.&rdquo

According to Williams, food can improve brain health in two major ways. First, antioxidant-rich and anti-inflammatory foods can help fight the free-radical damage and low-grade inflammation that lead to declining brain health. Second, foods that are nutrient-dense with protein, B vitamins, choline, vitamin C, iron, and zinc may support neurotransmitters, which carry messages between brain cells directing essential functions like sleep, mood, concentration, breathing, heart rate, and hunger.

So what&rsquos the best overall eating pattern to reap these benefits? Science is pointing to the MIND diet (Mediterranean-DASH Intervention for Neurodegenerative Delay)&mdashit&rsquos a combination of the classic Mediterranean diet and the hypertension-focused DASH diet. &ldquoResearch suggests even moderate adherence to the MIND diet slows brain decline and reduces the risk of Alzheimer&rsquos,&rdquo Williams says.

Cornerstone foods of the MIND diet include leafy greens, berries, nuts, olive oil, beans, whole grains, poultry, and fatty fish (and other sources of omega-3 fatty acids). The recipes featured here follow the MIND diet guidelines. What&rsquos more, they are easy to prep and big on flavor.


6 MIND Diet Recipes to Give Your Brain a Boost

You already know that what we eat can help build strong bones and muscles. But it turns out that our diet can also have a positive effect on our brains, enhancing memory and mental clarity, and even helping stave off dementia and Alzheimer&rsquos disease. Carolyn Williams, PhD, RD, author of the cookbook Meals That Heal, explains: &ldquoThe brain runs 24/7, requiring a constant supply of energy and nutrients. If it doesn&rsquot have the optimal fuel it needs, this affects its functioning and can also slowly change its structure.&rdquo

According to Williams, food can improve brain health in two major ways. First, antioxidant-rich and anti-inflammatory foods can help fight the free-radical damage and low-grade inflammation that lead to declining brain health. Second, foods that are nutrient-dense with protein, B vitamins, choline, vitamin C, iron, and zinc may support neurotransmitters, which carry messages between brain cells directing essential functions like sleep, mood, concentration, breathing, heart rate, and hunger.

So what&rsquos the best overall eating pattern to reap these benefits? Science is pointing to the MIND diet (Mediterranean-DASH Intervention for Neurodegenerative Delay)&mdashit&rsquos a combination of the classic Mediterranean diet and the hypertension-focused DASH diet. &ldquoResearch suggests even moderate adherence to the MIND diet slows brain decline and reduces the risk of Alzheimer&rsquos,&rdquo Williams says.

Cornerstone foods of the MIND diet include leafy greens, berries, nuts, olive oil, beans, whole grains, poultry, and fatty fish (and other sources of omega-3 fatty acids). The recipes featured here follow the MIND diet guidelines. What&rsquos more, they are easy to prep and big on flavor.


6 MIND Diet Recipes to Give Your Brain a Boost

You already know that what we eat can help build strong bones and muscles. But it turns out that our diet can also have a positive effect on our brains, enhancing memory and mental clarity, and even helping stave off dementia and Alzheimer&rsquos disease. Carolyn Williams, PhD, RD, author of the cookbook Meals That Heal, explains: &ldquoThe brain runs 24/7, requiring a constant supply of energy and nutrients. If it doesn&rsquot have the optimal fuel it needs, this affects its functioning and can also slowly change its structure.&rdquo

According to Williams, food can improve brain health in two major ways. First, antioxidant-rich and anti-inflammatory foods can help fight the free-radical damage and low-grade inflammation that lead to declining brain health. Second, foods that are nutrient-dense with protein, B vitamins, choline, vitamin C, iron, and zinc may support neurotransmitters, which carry messages between brain cells directing essential functions like sleep, mood, concentration, breathing, heart rate, and hunger.

So what&rsquos the best overall eating pattern to reap these benefits? Science is pointing to the MIND diet (Mediterranean-DASH Intervention for Neurodegenerative Delay)&mdashit&rsquos a combination of the classic Mediterranean diet and the hypertension-focused DASH diet. &ldquoResearch suggests even moderate adherence to the MIND diet slows brain decline and reduces the risk of Alzheimer&rsquos,&rdquo Williams says.

Cornerstone foods of the MIND diet include leafy greens, berries, nuts, olive oil, beans, whole grains, poultry, and fatty fish (and other sources of omega-3 fatty acids). The recipes featured here follow the MIND diet guidelines. What&rsquos more, they are easy to prep and big on flavor.


6 MIND Diet Recipes to Give Your Brain a Boost

You already know that what we eat can help build strong bones and muscles. But it turns out that our diet can also have a positive effect on our brains, enhancing memory and mental clarity, and even helping stave off dementia and Alzheimer&rsquos disease. Carolyn Williams, PhD, RD, author of the cookbook Meals That Heal, explains: &ldquoThe brain runs 24/7, requiring a constant supply of energy and nutrients. If it doesn&rsquot have the optimal fuel it needs, this affects its functioning and can also slowly change its structure.&rdquo

According to Williams, food can improve brain health in two major ways. First, antioxidant-rich and anti-inflammatory foods can help fight the free-radical damage and low-grade inflammation that lead to declining brain health. Second, foods that are nutrient-dense with protein, B vitamins, choline, vitamin C, iron, and zinc may support neurotransmitters, which carry messages between brain cells directing essential functions like sleep, mood, concentration, breathing, heart rate, and hunger.

So what&rsquos the best overall eating pattern to reap these benefits? Science is pointing to the MIND diet (Mediterranean-DASH Intervention for Neurodegenerative Delay)&mdashit&rsquos a combination of the classic Mediterranean diet and the hypertension-focused DASH diet. &ldquoResearch suggests even moderate adherence to the MIND diet slows brain decline and reduces the risk of Alzheimer&rsquos,&rdquo Williams says.

Cornerstone foods of the MIND diet include leafy greens, berries, nuts, olive oil, beans, whole grains, poultry, and fatty fish (and other sources of omega-3 fatty acids). The recipes featured here follow the MIND diet guidelines. What&rsquos more, they are easy to prep and big on flavor.


6 MIND Diet Recipes to Give Your Brain a Boost

You already know that what we eat can help build strong bones and muscles. But it turns out that our diet can also have a positive effect on our brains, enhancing memory and mental clarity, and even helping stave off dementia and Alzheimer&rsquos disease. Carolyn Williams, PhD, RD, author of the cookbook Meals That Heal, explains: &ldquoThe brain runs 24/7, requiring a constant supply of energy and nutrients. If it doesn&rsquot have the optimal fuel it needs, this affects its functioning and can also slowly change its structure.&rdquo

According to Williams, food can improve brain health in two major ways. First, antioxidant-rich and anti-inflammatory foods can help fight the free-radical damage and low-grade inflammation that lead to declining brain health. Second, foods that are nutrient-dense with protein, B vitamins, choline, vitamin C, iron, and zinc may support neurotransmitters, which carry messages between brain cells directing essential functions like sleep, mood, concentration, breathing, heart rate, and hunger.

So what&rsquos the best overall eating pattern to reap these benefits? Science is pointing to the MIND diet (Mediterranean-DASH Intervention for Neurodegenerative Delay)&mdashit&rsquos a combination of the classic Mediterranean diet and the hypertension-focused DASH diet. &ldquoResearch suggests even moderate adherence to the MIND diet slows brain decline and reduces the risk of Alzheimer&rsquos,&rdquo Williams says.

Cornerstone foods of the MIND diet include leafy greens, berries, nuts, olive oil, beans, whole grains, poultry, and fatty fish (and other sources of omega-3 fatty acids). The recipes featured here follow the MIND diet guidelines. What&rsquos more, they are easy to prep and big on flavor.


6 MIND Diet Recipes to Give Your Brain a Boost

You already know that what we eat can help build strong bones and muscles. But it turns out that our diet can also have a positive effect on our brains, enhancing memory and mental clarity, and even helping stave off dementia and Alzheimer&rsquos disease. Carolyn Williams, PhD, RD, author of the cookbook Meals That Heal, explains: &ldquoThe brain runs 24/7, requiring a constant supply of energy and nutrients. If it doesn&rsquot have the optimal fuel it needs, this affects its functioning and can also slowly change its structure.&rdquo

According to Williams, food can improve brain health in two major ways. First, antioxidant-rich and anti-inflammatory foods can help fight the free-radical damage and low-grade inflammation that lead to declining brain health. Second, foods that are nutrient-dense with protein, B vitamins, choline, vitamin C, iron, and zinc may support neurotransmitters, which carry messages between brain cells directing essential functions like sleep, mood, concentration, breathing, heart rate, and hunger.

So what&rsquos the best overall eating pattern to reap these benefits? Science is pointing to the MIND diet (Mediterranean-DASH Intervention for Neurodegenerative Delay)&mdashit&rsquos a combination of the classic Mediterranean diet and the hypertension-focused DASH diet. &ldquoResearch suggests even moderate adherence to the MIND diet slows brain decline and reduces the risk of Alzheimer&rsquos,&rdquo Williams says.

Cornerstone foods of the MIND diet include leafy greens, berries, nuts, olive oil, beans, whole grains, poultry, and fatty fish (and other sources of omega-3 fatty acids). The recipes featured here follow the MIND diet guidelines. What&rsquos more, they are easy to prep and big on flavor.



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