Traditional recipes

Silver Sprinkles Are Not Safe for Holiday Cookies, FDA Warns

Silver Sprinkles Are Not Safe for Holiday Cookies, FDA Warns

They may look it, but eating actual bits of metal is not glamorous

istockphoto.com

They might look pretty, but you're not supposed to eat them.

Think twice before eating that holiday cookie — but not because of the calories. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) wants you to know that not all cookie sprinkles are actually safe to eat.

Specifically, silver-covered decorative sprinkles are not approved as an edible food item. Despite the FDA’s incessant and insistent warnings, people have been baking with the silver morsels, anyway.

Officially called “silver dragées,” these decorative items have been on the FDA’s naughty list since 1906, when silver was banned as a food additive. In the 1970’s, the culinary world caught on to the use of silver to decorate food and began coating sprinkles in a very thin layer. This prompted FDA disapproval and a release denouncing the sprinkles as a purely decorative (and nonedible) food item.

Regardless of warnings, these silver-colored decorative sprinkles are sold in 49 states as of today, prohibited only in California. California banned the sprinkles in 2003 following a lawsuit showing they were significantly harmful if ingested.

If you see a silver sprinkle on your cookie, remove it before taking a bite. And if you’re baking this holiday season, stick to icing or rainbow sprinkles to decorate your delicious holiday treats.


How to Make Edible Cookie Dough So Insanely Good You Won't Want to Bake It

It's hard to find a child (or, um, an adult, TBH) who doesn't like licking the spoon while mixing cookie dough. Not only is it hard to wait for the baked cookies to be done, but there's something so addictive about that sweet, sticky dough. But unfortunately, because of the possibility of salmonella contamination from raw eggs or E. coli exposure from uncooked flour, raw dough isn't actually okay for kids—or grown-ups—to eat.

Savor the End of Summer with No-Bake Cookies

Which is why places like DŌ, a trendy new spot in New York City, have been making waves lately by selling safe versions of raw cookie dough scooped into cups or cones, in a milkshake, or as part of an ice cream sundae. The store makes their dough with pasteurized eggs and heat-treated flour, but home cook–friendly recipes for safe, raw cookie dough have been popping up all over the internet.

But when I tried the homemade, eggless versions I found online, I wasn't too impressed. Without the egg, the dough felt dry it lacked that familiar moist cookie-dough texture. Which made me wonder, how could I make eggless cookie dough that tastes, well, good? With a little trial and error—and lots and lots of dough—I figured it out. The final product is a super-fun, nostalgic treat that's perfect for making with kids.

Here's how to make edible cookie dough so delicious you won't want to wait to bake it:


How to Make Edible Cookie Dough So Insanely Good You Won't Want to Bake It

It's hard to find a child (or, um, an adult, TBH) who doesn't like licking the spoon while mixing cookie dough. Not only is it hard to wait for the baked cookies to be done, but there's something so addictive about that sweet, sticky dough. But unfortunately, because of the possibility of salmonella contamination from raw eggs or E. coli exposure from uncooked flour, raw dough isn't actually okay for kids—or grown-ups—to eat.

Savor the End of Summer with No-Bake Cookies

Which is why places like DŌ, a trendy new spot in New York City, have been making waves lately by selling safe versions of raw cookie dough scooped into cups or cones, in a milkshake, or as part of an ice cream sundae. The store makes their dough with pasteurized eggs and heat-treated flour, but home cook–friendly recipes for safe, raw cookie dough have been popping up all over the internet.

But when I tried the homemade, eggless versions I found online, I wasn't too impressed. Without the egg, the dough felt dry it lacked that familiar moist cookie-dough texture. Which made me wonder, how could I make eggless cookie dough that tastes, well, good? With a little trial and error—and lots and lots of dough—I figured it out. The final product is a super-fun, nostalgic treat that's perfect for making with kids.

Here's how to make edible cookie dough so delicious you won't want to wait to bake it:


How to Make Edible Cookie Dough So Insanely Good You Won't Want to Bake It

It's hard to find a child (or, um, an adult, TBH) who doesn't like licking the spoon while mixing cookie dough. Not only is it hard to wait for the baked cookies to be done, but there's something so addictive about that sweet, sticky dough. But unfortunately, because of the possibility of salmonella contamination from raw eggs or E. coli exposure from uncooked flour, raw dough isn't actually okay for kids—or grown-ups—to eat.

Savor the End of Summer with No-Bake Cookies

Which is why places like DŌ, a trendy new spot in New York City, have been making waves lately by selling safe versions of raw cookie dough scooped into cups or cones, in a milkshake, or as part of an ice cream sundae. The store makes their dough with pasteurized eggs and heat-treated flour, but home cook–friendly recipes for safe, raw cookie dough have been popping up all over the internet.

But when I tried the homemade, eggless versions I found online, I wasn't too impressed. Without the egg, the dough felt dry it lacked that familiar moist cookie-dough texture. Which made me wonder, how could I make eggless cookie dough that tastes, well, good? With a little trial and error—and lots and lots of dough—I figured it out. The final product is a super-fun, nostalgic treat that's perfect for making with kids.

Here's how to make edible cookie dough so delicious you won't want to wait to bake it:


How to Make Edible Cookie Dough So Insanely Good You Won't Want to Bake It

It's hard to find a child (or, um, an adult, TBH) who doesn't like licking the spoon while mixing cookie dough. Not only is it hard to wait for the baked cookies to be done, but there's something so addictive about that sweet, sticky dough. But unfortunately, because of the possibility of salmonella contamination from raw eggs or E. coli exposure from uncooked flour, raw dough isn't actually okay for kids—or grown-ups—to eat.

Savor the End of Summer with No-Bake Cookies

Which is why places like DŌ, a trendy new spot in New York City, have been making waves lately by selling safe versions of raw cookie dough scooped into cups or cones, in a milkshake, or as part of an ice cream sundae. The store makes their dough with pasteurized eggs and heat-treated flour, but home cook–friendly recipes for safe, raw cookie dough have been popping up all over the internet.

But when I tried the homemade, eggless versions I found online, I wasn't too impressed. Without the egg, the dough felt dry it lacked that familiar moist cookie-dough texture. Which made me wonder, how could I make eggless cookie dough that tastes, well, good? With a little trial and error—and lots and lots of dough—I figured it out. The final product is a super-fun, nostalgic treat that's perfect for making with kids.

Here's how to make edible cookie dough so delicious you won't want to wait to bake it:


How to Make Edible Cookie Dough So Insanely Good You Won't Want to Bake It

It's hard to find a child (or, um, an adult, TBH) who doesn't like licking the spoon while mixing cookie dough. Not only is it hard to wait for the baked cookies to be done, but there's something so addictive about that sweet, sticky dough. But unfortunately, because of the possibility of salmonella contamination from raw eggs or E. coli exposure from uncooked flour, raw dough isn't actually okay for kids—or grown-ups—to eat.

Savor the End of Summer with No-Bake Cookies

Which is why places like DŌ, a trendy new spot in New York City, have been making waves lately by selling safe versions of raw cookie dough scooped into cups or cones, in a milkshake, or as part of an ice cream sundae. The store makes their dough with pasteurized eggs and heat-treated flour, but home cook–friendly recipes for safe, raw cookie dough have been popping up all over the internet.

But when I tried the homemade, eggless versions I found online, I wasn't too impressed. Without the egg, the dough felt dry it lacked that familiar moist cookie-dough texture. Which made me wonder, how could I make eggless cookie dough that tastes, well, good? With a little trial and error—and lots and lots of dough—I figured it out. The final product is a super-fun, nostalgic treat that's perfect for making with kids.

Here's how to make edible cookie dough so delicious you won't want to wait to bake it:


How to Make Edible Cookie Dough So Insanely Good You Won't Want to Bake It

It's hard to find a child (or, um, an adult, TBH) who doesn't like licking the spoon while mixing cookie dough. Not only is it hard to wait for the baked cookies to be done, but there's something so addictive about that sweet, sticky dough. But unfortunately, because of the possibility of salmonella contamination from raw eggs or E. coli exposure from uncooked flour, raw dough isn't actually okay for kids—or grown-ups—to eat.

Savor the End of Summer with No-Bake Cookies

Which is why places like DŌ, a trendy new spot in New York City, have been making waves lately by selling safe versions of raw cookie dough scooped into cups or cones, in a milkshake, or as part of an ice cream sundae. The store makes their dough with pasteurized eggs and heat-treated flour, but home cook–friendly recipes for safe, raw cookie dough have been popping up all over the internet.

But when I tried the homemade, eggless versions I found online, I wasn't too impressed. Without the egg, the dough felt dry it lacked that familiar moist cookie-dough texture. Which made me wonder, how could I make eggless cookie dough that tastes, well, good? With a little trial and error—and lots and lots of dough—I figured it out. The final product is a super-fun, nostalgic treat that's perfect for making with kids.

Here's how to make edible cookie dough so delicious you won't want to wait to bake it:


How to Make Edible Cookie Dough So Insanely Good You Won't Want to Bake It

It's hard to find a child (or, um, an adult, TBH) who doesn't like licking the spoon while mixing cookie dough. Not only is it hard to wait for the baked cookies to be done, but there's something so addictive about that sweet, sticky dough. But unfortunately, because of the possibility of salmonella contamination from raw eggs or E. coli exposure from uncooked flour, raw dough isn't actually okay for kids—or grown-ups—to eat.

Savor the End of Summer with No-Bake Cookies

Which is why places like DŌ, a trendy new spot in New York City, have been making waves lately by selling safe versions of raw cookie dough scooped into cups or cones, in a milkshake, or as part of an ice cream sundae. The store makes their dough with pasteurized eggs and heat-treated flour, but home cook–friendly recipes for safe, raw cookie dough have been popping up all over the internet.

But when I tried the homemade, eggless versions I found online, I wasn't too impressed. Without the egg, the dough felt dry it lacked that familiar moist cookie-dough texture. Which made me wonder, how could I make eggless cookie dough that tastes, well, good? With a little trial and error—and lots and lots of dough—I figured it out. The final product is a super-fun, nostalgic treat that's perfect for making with kids.

Here's how to make edible cookie dough so delicious you won't want to wait to bake it:


How to Make Edible Cookie Dough So Insanely Good You Won't Want to Bake It

It's hard to find a child (or, um, an adult, TBH) who doesn't like licking the spoon while mixing cookie dough. Not only is it hard to wait for the baked cookies to be done, but there's something so addictive about that sweet, sticky dough. But unfortunately, because of the possibility of salmonella contamination from raw eggs or E. coli exposure from uncooked flour, raw dough isn't actually okay for kids—or grown-ups—to eat.

Savor the End of Summer with No-Bake Cookies

Which is why places like DŌ, a trendy new spot in New York City, have been making waves lately by selling safe versions of raw cookie dough scooped into cups or cones, in a milkshake, or as part of an ice cream sundae. The store makes their dough with pasteurized eggs and heat-treated flour, but home cook–friendly recipes for safe, raw cookie dough have been popping up all over the internet.

But when I tried the homemade, eggless versions I found online, I wasn't too impressed. Without the egg, the dough felt dry it lacked that familiar moist cookie-dough texture. Which made me wonder, how could I make eggless cookie dough that tastes, well, good? With a little trial and error—and lots and lots of dough—I figured it out. The final product is a super-fun, nostalgic treat that's perfect for making with kids.

Here's how to make edible cookie dough so delicious you won't want to wait to bake it:


How to Make Edible Cookie Dough So Insanely Good You Won't Want to Bake It

It's hard to find a child (or, um, an adult, TBH) who doesn't like licking the spoon while mixing cookie dough. Not only is it hard to wait for the baked cookies to be done, but there's something so addictive about that sweet, sticky dough. But unfortunately, because of the possibility of salmonella contamination from raw eggs or E. coli exposure from uncooked flour, raw dough isn't actually okay for kids—or grown-ups—to eat.

Savor the End of Summer with No-Bake Cookies

Which is why places like DŌ, a trendy new spot in New York City, have been making waves lately by selling safe versions of raw cookie dough scooped into cups or cones, in a milkshake, or as part of an ice cream sundae. The store makes their dough with pasteurized eggs and heat-treated flour, but home cook–friendly recipes for safe, raw cookie dough have been popping up all over the internet.

But when I tried the homemade, eggless versions I found online, I wasn't too impressed. Without the egg, the dough felt dry it lacked that familiar moist cookie-dough texture. Which made me wonder, how could I make eggless cookie dough that tastes, well, good? With a little trial and error—and lots and lots of dough—I figured it out. The final product is a super-fun, nostalgic treat that's perfect for making with kids.

Here's how to make edible cookie dough so delicious you won't want to wait to bake it:


How to Make Edible Cookie Dough So Insanely Good You Won't Want to Bake It

It's hard to find a child (or, um, an adult, TBH) who doesn't like licking the spoon while mixing cookie dough. Not only is it hard to wait for the baked cookies to be done, but there's something so addictive about that sweet, sticky dough. But unfortunately, because of the possibility of salmonella contamination from raw eggs or E. coli exposure from uncooked flour, raw dough isn't actually okay for kids—or grown-ups—to eat.

Savor the End of Summer with No-Bake Cookies

Which is why places like DŌ, a trendy new spot in New York City, have been making waves lately by selling safe versions of raw cookie dough scooped into cups or cones, in a milkshake, or as part of an ice cream sundae. The store makes their dough with pasteurized eggs and heat-treated flour, but home cook–friendly recipes for safe, raw cookie dough have been popping up all over the internet.

But when I tried the homemade, eggless versions I found online, I wasn't too impressed. Without the egg, the dough felt dry it lacked that familiar moist cookie-dough texture. Which made me wonder, how could I make eggless cookie dough that tastes, well, good? With a little trial and error—and lots and lots of dough—I figured it out. The final product is a super-fun, nostalgic treat that's perfect for making with kids.

Here's how to make edible cookie dough so delicious you won't want to wait to bake it: