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Will Maine Lobsters Be the Next Victims of Climate Change?

Will Maine Lobsters Be the Next Victims of Climate Change?


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If the ocean’s temperatures keep rising, lobsters will be in danger of going extinct, Maine scientists say

Baby lobsters can’t stand the heat and may get out of the ocean.

The latest victim of rising global temperatures is the Maine lobster. New England scientists from the University of Maine Darling Marine Center and Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences have found that baby lobsters struggle to survive when placed in temperatures a mere 5 degrees higher than the usual cold waters off the coast of Maine.

High temperatures actually help the baby lobsters develop faster, but despite this fact, they will often die off more quickly than when in cold waters. The effect is already being felt in southern New England where, off the coast of Cape Cod, Massachusetts, the lobster haul fell to 3.3 million pounds in 2013 from its peak at 22 million pounds in 1997, according to Nature World News.

"There has been a near total collapse in Rhode Island, the southern end of the fishery, and we know our waters are getting warmer," Jessica Waller, one of the study’s authors, said in a statement. "We are hoping this research can be a jumping off point for more research into how lobsters might do over the next century."

The study is considered to be very important as scientists start to understand the effect of shifting ocean temperatures and chemistry, as well as rapid climate change. The consequences of global warming are starting to become ever-clearer and pressing to scientists. Research predicts the slow-down or complete extinction of certain crops and products like wheat, coffee, and even beer.


Global Warming Is Driving Maine Lobsters to Extinction

If ocean temperatures continue to rise at their current rate, lobster population could be in trouble by 2100.

Lobster lovers, beware. Time might be running out to enjoy Maine&aposs most beloved crustaceans, and the culprit is global warming. A new study by scientists at the University of Maine has found that if ocean temperatures continue to rise at their current rate, lobster populations could be in trouble by the year 2100.

Published in the latest issue of the ICES Journal of Marine Science, the report claims that lobster larvae, under close evaluation, had difficulty surviving in water five degrees warmer than the current average temperature of the Gulf of Maine, where many of the state&aposs large lobster population call home. The 3,000 baby lobsters studied appeared to develop faster in warmer waters, but had more difficulty surviving than their cooler water counterparts.

The scientists conducting the study, from the university&aposs Maine Darling Marine Center and Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences, raised the water temperature based on the UN&aposs forecasts for the Gulf of Maine in 85 years.

Currently, the United States&apos overall lobster haul is as high as it&aposs ever been𠅊s is export demand from countries like Asia, where high-end diners are more increasingly seeking out the indulgent American fare. In 2014 alone, lobster fisherman earned a half billion dollars in value for their catch, The Associated Press reports. However, scientists caution that this peak period for lobster harvest could soon take a sharp downturn if coastal waterways continue to be affected by global warming.

Jesica Waller, a lead author of the study, hopes that this new data will call for further urgency to counteract climate change, which has already impacted the waters of New England.

"There has been a near total collapse in Rhode Island, the southern end of the fishery, and we know our waters are getting warmer," Waller told the AP, "We are hoping this research can be a jumping-off point for more research into how lobsters might do over the next century."

In the meantime, one thing&aposs for sure: fans of the red crustacean might be wise to start eating all the lobster rolls you can now, because those days might be limited.


Global Warming Is Driving Maine Lobsters to Extinction

If ocean temperatures continue to rise at their current rate, lobster population could be in trouble by 2100.

Lobster lovers, beware. Time might be running out to enjoy Maine&aposs most beloved crustaceans, and the culprit is global warming. A new study by scientists at the University of Maine has found that if ocean temperatures continue to rise at their current rate, lobster populations could be in trouble by the year 2100.

Published in the latest issue of the ICES Journal of Marine Science, the report claims that lobster larvae, under close evaluation, had difficulty surviving in water five degrees warmer than the current average temperature of the Gulf of Maine, where many of the state&aposs large lobster population call home. The 3,000 baby lobsters studied appeared to develop faster in warmer waters, but had more difficulty surviving than their cooler water counterparts.

The scientists conducting the study, from the university&aposs Maine Darling Marine Center and Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences, raised the water temperature based on the UN&aposs forecasts for the Gulf of Maine in 85 years.

Currently, the United States&apos overall lobster haul is as high as it&aposs ever been𠅊s is export demand from countries like Asia, where high-end diners are more increasingly seeking out the indulgent American fare. In 2014 alone, lobster fisherman earned a half billion dollars in value for their catch, The Associated Press reports. However, scientists caution that this peak period for lobster harvest could soon take a sharp downturn if coastal waterways continue to be affected by global warming.

Jesica Waller, a lead author of the study, hopes that this new data will call for further urgency to counteract climate change, which has already impacted the waters of New England.

"There has been a near total collapse in Rhode Island, the southern end of the fishery, and we know our waters are getting warmer," Waller told the AP, "We are hoping this research can be a jumping-off point for more research into how lobsters might do over the next century."

In the meantime, one thing&aposs for sure: fans of the red crustacean might be wise to start eating all the lobster rolls you can now, because those days might be limited.


Global Warming Is Driving Maine Lobsters to Extinction

If ocean temperatures continue to rise at their current rate, lobster population could be in trouble by 2100.

Lobster lovers, beware. Time might be running out to enjoy Maine&aposs most beloved crustaceans, and the culprit is global warming. A new study by scientists at the University of Maine has found that if ocean temperatures continue to rise at their current rate, lobster populations could be in trouble by the year 2100.

Published in the latest issue of the ICES Journal of Marine Science, the report claims that lobster larvae, under close evaluation, had difficulty surviving in water five degrees warmer than the current average temperature of the Gulf of Maine, where many of the state&aposs large lobster population call home. The 3,000 baby lobsters studied appeared to develop faster in warmer waters, but had more difficulty surviving than their cooler water counterparts.

The scientists conducting the study, from the university&aposs Maine Darling Marine Center and Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences, raised the water temperature based on the UN&aposs forecasts for the Gulf of Maine in 85 years.

Currently, the United States&apos overall lobster haul is as high as it&aposs ever been𠅊s is export demand from countries like Asia, where high-end diners are more increasingly seeking out the indulgent American fare. In 2014 alone, lobster fisherman earned a half billion dollars in value for their catch, The Associated Press reports. However, scientists caution that this peak period for lobster harvest could soon take a sharp downturn if coastal waterways continue to be affected by global warming.

Jesica Waller, a lead author of the study, hopes that this new data will call for further urgency to counteract climate change, which has already impacted the waters of New England.

"There has been a near total collapse in Rhode Island, the southern end of the fishery, and we know our waters are getting warmer," Waller told the AP, "We are hoping this research can be a jumping-off point for more research into how lobsters might do over the next century."

In the meantime, one thing&aposs for sure: fans of the red crustacean might be wise to start eating all the lobster rolls you can now, because those days might be limited.


Global Warming Is Driving Maine Lobsters to Extinction

If ocean temperatures continue to rise at their current rate, lobster population could be in trouble by 2100.

Lobster lovers, beware. Time might be running out to enjoy Maine&aposs most beloved crustaceans, and the culprit is global warming. A new study by scientists at the University of Maine has found that if ocean temperatures continue to rise at their current rate, lobster populations could be in trouble by the year 2100.

Published in the latest issue of the ICES Journal of Marine Science, the report claims that lobster larvae, under close evaluation, had difficulty surviving in water five degrees warmer than the current average temperature of the Gulf of Maine, where many of the state&aposs large lobster population call home. The 3,000 baby lobsters studied appeared to develop faster in warmer waters, but had more difficulty surviving than their cooler water counterparts.

The scientists conducting the study, from the university&aposs Maine Darling Marine Center and Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences, raised the water temperature based on the UN&aposs forecasts for the Gulf of Maine in 85 years.

Currently, the United States&apos overall lobster haul is as high as it&aposs ever been𠅊s is export demand from countries like Asia, where high-end diners are more increasingly seeking out the indulgent American fare. In 2014 alone, lobster fisherman earned a half billion dollars in value for their catch, The Associated Press reports. However, scientists caution that this peak period for lobster harvest could soon take a sharp downturn if coastal waterways continue to be affected by global warming.

Jesica Waller, a lead author of the study, hopes that this new data will call for further urgency to counteract climate change, which has already impacted the waters of New England.

"There has been a near total collapse in Rhode Island, the southern end of the fishery, and we know our waters are getting warmer," Waller told the AP, "We are hoping this research can be a jumping-off point for more research into how lobsters might do over the next century."

In the meantime, one thing&aposs for sure: fans of the red crustacean might be wise to start eating all the lobster rolls you can now, because those days might be limited.


Global Warming Is Driving Maine Lobsters to Extinction

If ocean temperatures continue to rise at their current rate, lobster population could be in trouble by 2100.

Lobster lovers, beware. Time might be running out to enjoy Maine&aposs most beloved crustaceans, and the culprit is global warming. A new study by scientists at the University of Maine has found that if ocean temperatures continue to rise at their current rate, lobster populations could be in trouble by the year 2100.

Published in the latest issue of the ICES Journal of Marine Science, the report claims that lobster larvae, under close evaluation, had difficulty surviving in water five degrees warmer than the current average temperature of the Gulf of Maine, where many of the state&aposs large lobster population call home. The 3,000 baby lobsters studied appeared to develop faster in warmer waters, but had more difficulty surviving than their cooler water counterparts.

The scientists conducting the study, from the university&aposs Maine Darling Marine Center and Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences, raised the water temperature based on the UN&aposs forecasts for the Gulf of Maine in 85 years.

Currently, the United States&apos overall lobster haul is as high as it&aposs ever been𠅊s is export demand from countries like Asia, where high-end diners are more increasingly seeking out the indulgent American fare. In 2014 alone, lobster fisherman earned a half billion dollars in value for their catch, The Associated Press reports. However, scientists caution that this peak period for lobster harvest could soon take a sharp downturn if coastal waterways continue to be affected by global warming.

Jesica Waller, a lead author of the study, hopes that this new data will call for further urgency to counteract climate change, which has already impacted the waters of New England.

"There has been a near total collapse in Rhode Island, the southern end of the fishery, and we know our waters are getting warmer," Waller told the AP, "We are hoping this research can be a jumping-off point for more research into how lobsters might do over the next century."

In the meantime, one thing&aposs for sure: fans of the red crustacean might be wise to start eating all the lobster rolls you can now, because those days might be limited.


Global Warming Is Driving Maine Lobsters to Extinction

If ocean temperatures continue to rise at their current rate, lobster population could be in trouble by 2100.

Lobster lovers, beware. Time might be running out to enjoy Maine&aposs most beloved crustaceans, and the culprit is global warming. A new study by scientists at the University of Maine has found that if ocean temperatures continue to rise at their current rate, lobster populations could be in trouble by the year 2100.

Published in the latest issue of the ICES Journal of Marine Science, the report claims that lobster larvae, under close evaluation, had difficulty surviving in water five degrees warmer than the current average temperature of the Gulf of Maine, where many of the state&aposs large lobster population call home. The 3,000 baby lobsters studied appeared to develop faster in warmer waters, but had more difficulty surviving than their cooler water counterparts.

The scientists conducting the study, from the university&aposs Maine Darling Marine Center and Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences, raised the water temperature based on the UN&aposs forecasts for the Gulf of Maine in 85 years.

Currently, the United States&apos overall lobster haul is as high as it&aposs ever been𠅊s is export demand from countries like Asia, where high-end diners are more increasingly seeking out the indulgent American fare. In 2014 alone, lobster fisherman earned a half billion dollars in value for their catch, The Associated Press reports. However, scientists caution that this peak period for lobster harvest could soon take a sharp downturn if coastal waterways continue to be affected by global warming.

Jesica Waller, a lead author of the study, hopes that this new data will call for further urgency to counteract climate change, which has already impacted the waters of New England.

"There has been a near total collapse in Rhode Island, the southern end of the fishery, and we know our waters are getting warmer," Waller told the AP, "We are hoping this research can be a jumping-off point for more research into how lobsters might do over the next century."

In the meantime, one thing&aposs for sure: fans of the red crustacean might be wise to start eating all the lobster rolls you can now, because those days might be limited.


Global Warming Is Driving Maine Lobsters to Extinction

If ocean temperatures continue to rise at their current rate, lobster population could be in trouble by 2100.

Lobster lovers, beware. Time might be running out to enjoy Maine&aposs most beloved crustaceans, and the culprit is global warming. A new study by scientists at the University of Maine has found that if ocean temperatures continue to rise at their current rate, lobster populations could be in trouble by the year 2100.

Published in the latest issue of the ICES Journal of Marine Science, the report claims that lobster larvae, under close evaluation, had difficulty surviving in water five degrees warmer than the current average temperature of the Gulf of Maine, where many of the state&aposs large lobster population call home. The 3,000 baby lobsters studied appeared to develop faster in warmer waters, but had more difficulty surviving than their cooler water counterparts.

The scientists conducting the study, from the university&aposs Maine Darling Marine Center and Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences, raised the water temperature based on the UN&aposs forecasts for the Gulf of Maine in 85 years.

Currently, the United States&apos overall lobster haul is as high as it&aposs ever been𠅊s is export demand from countries like Asia, where high-end diners are more increasingly seeking out the indulgent American fare. In 2014 alone, lobster fisherman earned a half billion dollars in value for their catch, The Associated Press reports. However, scientists caution that this peak period for lobster harvest could soon take a sharp downturn if coastal waterways continue to be affected by global warming.

Jesica Waller, a lead author of the study, hopes that this new data will call for further urgency to counteract climate change, which has already impacted the waters of New England.

"There has been a near total collapse in Rhode Island, the southern end of the fishery, and we know our waters are getting warmer," Waller told the AP, "We are hoping this research can be a jumping-off point for more research into how lobsters might do over the next century."

In the meantime, one thing&aposs for sure: fans of the red crustacean might be wise to start eating all the lobster rolls you can now, because those days might be limited.


Global Warming Is Driving Maine Lobsters to Extinction

If ocean temperatures continue to rise at their current rate, lobster population could be in trouble by 2100.

Lobster lovers, beware. Time might be running out to enjoy Maine&aposs most beloved crustaceans, and the culprit is global warming. A new study by scientists at the University of Maine has found that if ocean temperatures continue to rise at their current rate, lobster populations could be in trouble by the year 2100.

Published in the latest issue of the ICES Journal of Marine Science, the report claims that lobster larvae, under close evaluation, had difficulty surviving in water five degrees warmer than the current average temperature of the Gulf of Maine, where many of the state&aposs large lobster population call home. The 3,000 baby lobsters studied appeared to develop faster in warmer waters, but had more difficulty surviving than their cooler water counterparts.

The scientists conducting the study, from the university&aposs Maine Darling Marine Center and Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences, raised the water temperature based on the UN&aposs forecasts for the Gulf of Maine in 85 years.

Currently, the United States&apos overall lobster haul is as high as it&aposs ever been𠅊s is export demand from countries like Asia, where high-end diners are more increasingly seeking out the indulgent American fare. In 2014 alone, lobster fisherman earned a half billion dollars in value for their catch, The Associated Press reports. However, scientists caution that this peak period for lobster harvest could soon take a sharp downturn if coastal waterways continue to be affected by global warming.

Jesica Waller, a lead author of the study, hopes that this new data will call for further urgency to counteract climate change, which has already impacted the waters of New England.

"There has been a near total collapse in Rhode Island, the southern end of the fishery, and we know our waters are getting warmer," Waller told the AP, "We are hoping this research can be a jumping-off point for more research into how lobsters might do over the next century."

In the meantime, one thing&aposs for sure: fans of the red crustacean might be wise to start eating all the lobster rolls you can now, because those days might be limited.


Global Warming Is Driving Maine Lobsters to Extinction

If ocean temperatures continue to rise at their current rate, lobster population could be in trouble by 2100.

Lobster lovers, beware. Time might be running out to enjoy Maine&aposs most beloved crustaceans, and the culprit is global warming. A new study by scientists at the University of Maine has found that if ocean temperatures continue to rise at their current rate, lobster populations could be in trouble by the year 2100.

Published in the latest issue of the ICES Journal of Marine Science, the report claims that lobster larvae, under close evaluation, had difficulty surviving in water five degrees warmer than the current average temperature of the Gulf of Maine, where many of the state&aposs large lobster population call home. The 3,000 baby lobsters studied appeared to develop faster in warmer waters, but had more difficulty surviving than their cooler water counterparts.

The scientists conducting the study, from the university&aposs Maine Darling Marine Center and Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences, raised the water temperature based on the UN&aposs forecasts for the Gulf of Maine in 85 years.

Currently, the United States&apos overall lobster haul is as high as it&aposs ever been𠅊s is export demand from countries like Asia, where high-end diners are more increasingly seeking out the indulgent American fare. In 2014 alone, lobster fisherman earned a half billion dollars in value for their catch, The Associated Press reports. However, scientists caution that this peak period for lobster harvest could soon take a sharp downturn if coastal waterways continue to be affected by global warming.

Jesica Waller, a lead author of the study, hopes that this new data will call for further urgency to counteract climate change, which has already impacted the waters of New England.

"There has been a near total collapse in Rhode Island, the southern end of the fishery, and we know our waters are getting warmer," Waller told the AP, "We are hoping this research can be a jumping-off point for more research into how lobsters might do over the next century."

In the meantime, one thing&aposs for sure: fans of the red crustacean might be wise to start eating all the lobster rolls you can now, because those days might be limited.


Global Warming Is Driving Maine Lobsters to Extinction

If ocean temperatures continue to rise at their current rate, lobster population could be in trouble by 2100.

Lobster lovers, beware. Time might be running out to enjoy Maine&aposs most beloved crustaceans, and the culprit is global warming. A new study by scientists at the University of Maine has found that if ocean temperatures continue to rise at their current rate, lobster populations could be in trouble by the year 2100.

Published in the latest issue of the ICES Journal of Marine Science, the report claims that lobster larvae, under close evaluation, had difficulty surviving in water five degrees warmer than the current average temperature of the Gulf of Maine, where many of the state&aposs large lobster population call home. The 3,000 baby lobsters studied appeared to develop faster in warmer waters, but had more difficulty surviving than their cooler water counterparts.

The scientists conducting the study, from the university&aposs Maine Darling Marine Center and Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences, raised the water temperature based on the UN&aposs forecasts for the Gulf of Maine in 85 years.

Currently, the United States&apos overall lobster haul is as high as it&aposs ever been𠅊s is export demand from countries like Asia, where high-end diners are more increasingly seeking out the indulgent American fare. In 2014 alone, lobster fisherman earned a half billion dollars in value for their catch, The Associated Press reports. However, scientists caution that this peak period for lobster harvest could soon take a sharp downturn if coastal waterways continue to be affected by global warming.

Jesica Waller, a lead author of the study, hopes that this new data will call for further urgency to counteract climate change, which has already impacted the waters of New England.

"There has been a near total collapse in Rhode Island, the southern end of the fishery, and we know our waters are getting warmer," Waller told the AP, "We are hoping this research can be a jumping-off point for more research into how lobsters might do over the next century."

In the meantime, one thing&aposs for sure: fans of the red crustacean might be wise to start eating all the lobster rolls you can now, because those days might be limited.


Watch the video: Φρίκη! Αν δεις αυτό το βίντεο δεν θα ξαναφάς αστακό ή καβούρι! (June 2022).


Comments:

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  2. Lotharing

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  3. Tutu

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  4. Hwertun

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  5. Vudobei

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