Traditional recipes

Bacon-Blanketed, Herb Roasted Turkey

Bacon-Blanketed, Herb Roasted Turkey

This is the turkey. It gets a salt scrub, a bacon butter deep tissue massage, a hand-woven bacon spa robe, some time in the sauna and a little tanning to finish it off.

Notes

This recipe was adapted from its original on The Runaway Spoon. Visit the website for the full recipe and for other delicious recipes.

Ingredients

  • One 10 to 15-pound turkey
  • 1 1/2 Pound bacon
  • 1/2 Pound butter
  • Fresh herbs, such as sage, thyme, oregano, parsley, marjoram, and rosemary
  • 2 carrots, roughly chopped
  • 2 stalks celery, roughly chopped
  • 4 onions, roughly chopped
  • 2 leeks, roughly chopped
  • 4 apples, sliced in half

Servings10

Calories Per Serving1097

Folate equivalent (total)57µg14%

Riboflavin (B2)0.9mg50.4%


By Perre Coleman Magness, The Runaway Spoon

  • A large plastic bag
  • A platter or pan that fits the turkey in the fridge
  • Kitchen twine
  • A roasting pan that fits the turkey (and fits in your oven. Check. This is important.)
  • A probe-style meat thermometer
  • A turkey
  • Lots of kosher salt
  • 1-1/2 pounds bacon
  • 1/2 pound butter
  • Fresh herbs: sage, thyme, oregano, parsley, marjoram, rosemary
  • Roasting vegetables: carrots, celery, onions, leeks, apples

Step 1: Brine your bird

I dry brine my turkey for a juicy bird. I used to wet brine, which involved removing drawers from my fridge and stuffing turkey into a large stockpot full of salted water. That is a lot of trouble. Here’s my easy solution that makes for a lovely moist turkey.

Start the brine 2 to 3 days before Thanksgiving. Remove all the interior parts from the bird. Discard them or use them for stock, or the giblets for gravy. Wash the bird well, inside and out. Place the bird in a great big plastic bag. Cookware stores sell fancy “brining bags” but a cheap browning bag from the grocery works just as well, or a big Ziplock bag. Go to town rubbing kosher salt all over the gobbler, inside and out. Use a lot of salt. Wash your hands. Tie the bag closed and place it on a platter or pan and put it in the fridge for up to two days. I do this on Tuesday, butter it up on Wednesday for cooking on Thursday. Thoroughly wash the sink you rinsed the turkey in. Right now.

Step 2: Butter and herb rub

Now we work on the flavor and added juiciness. I tinkered with this recipe for many years, until I hit on just the right method. I have always rubbed butter on roasted chicken or turkey, or covered it in bacon to keep the bird moist. For a big mama gobbler, I double down.

In a food processor, blend together 1/2 pound raw bacon slices, 1/2 pound butter and generous handfuls of fresh herbs. I like a lot of sage, some parsley, oregano, thyme, marjoram and maybe rosemary. A packet and a half of “poultry herbs” works well. Blend all this until you have a smooth paste. You can make this ahead and store the bacon butter in an airtight container for up to five days.

We eat our big meal at 1 o’clock, so I like to have everything ready to go in the morning. I prepare my bird on Wednesday evening and refrigerate it. I have a timer feature on my oven that lets me start preheating before I want to wake up, so the oven is ready for the bird when I stumble out of bed.

When you are ready to prepare the turkey, bring the bacon butter to room temperature. Take the turkey out of its salt bag and give it a good rinse. Place it breast side up on a large platter or pan that will fit in the fridge. Wash the sink you rinsed the turkey in. Now. If your turkey comes with a pop-up timer, remove it now. It’s useless. Wash your hands, remove your rings and watch and gently separate the skin from the flesh. Lift the skin by the cavity and gently slide your hands under the skin. It will pull away from the flesh. Keep going to get the skin opened up all the way to the neck and over the legs. Try not to tear the skin, but don’t fall apart if you do. It’s not a big deal. Now take big fistfuls of butter and rub it up under the skin and over the flesh. Use about 3/4 quarters of the bacon butter under the flesh. Pat the skin down and press the butter into a pretty even layer under the skin. Rub the remaining butter over the outside of the bird, paying particular attention to the legs, which will not be covered by the bacon blanket.

Step 3: Create the bacon lattice

There is nothing like presenting a beautiful bird to your guests at Thanksgiving, and if I may say so, this is a stunner. But the bacon is not only decorative, it amps up the juiciness of the meat and flavors the juices for the gravy. I use thick cut bacon, the best I can find. I don’t use any kind of artificially flavored bacon. My big babies use about a pound of bacon.

I think the picture really says it all. I weave the bacon strips into a lattice. It’s kind of like making those construction paper place mats from kindergarten. Lay one strip crosswise over the breast, then one lengthwise. Keep going, folding up the strips already placed to fit the new ones under. The bacon will shrink when you cook the bird, so place the strips close together and use as many as you can fit. Tie the legs of the bird together with kitchen twine. When you’ve got the bacon all woven, wash your hands thoroughly, put the bird in the fridge, and collapse on the sofa.

As I said, we do the meal for lunch, and I am not a morning person, so I do as much ahead as possible. With the turkey ready to go and the oven heated to 450 degrees F., I get ready to roast. Remember, remove one rack and place the other in the right position to fit the pan with the bird. You don’t want to get everything hot, then have to move things around. I like good, flavorful juices from the bird to add to gravy. That really is the only thing that makes gravy worth serving. My roasting technique creates good juices.

Step 4: Roast the bird

Line the deep roasting that fits your bird with several layers of foil. It never makes clean up a breeze, but it helps. If you have a rack that fits a deep roasting pan, great. I use a grid that is technically a cooling rack. No rack, nor problem. Just set the bird on the vegetables as follows. Cover the bottom of the roasting dish with a thick layer of aromatic root vegetables. Whole vegetables, don’t peel or chop, just remove the paper from onions and the tops from carrots. I use carrots, celery, leeks, onions, and a couple of apples cut in half.

Stuff an apple and an onion into the cavity of the bird. Tuck some fresh sage leaves and any other herbs you have around the bird. Place the rack over the vegetables if you are using one, don’t worry if it’s wobbly, or just put the bird on the vegetables directly. Take a piece of foil and mold it to make a shield to cover the bird if it starts to brown too much later. Remove the molded piece of foil to a safe place. It is really hard to properly cover a hot turkey in a hot oven.

Roast the turkey at 450 degrees F. for 30 minutes, then turn the heat down to 375 degrees F. for the rest of the cooking. I highly recommend that you make the small investment in a probe meat thermometer, one with a probe to stick in the turkey and a long cord that plugs into a counter unit. Gently stick the probe into a thick part of the breast, carefully sliding it between an opening in the bacon blanket. Make sure you don’t’ go so deep you hit the bone. You want the turkey to be cooked to 165 degrees F. I usually set the thermometer to 155 degrees F., remove the turkey from the oven and cover the whole pan with foil. I let it rest until it reaches 165 degrees F. If the turkey and the bacon start to get too brown before the meat is cooked, cover it with your prepared foil armor.

Generally, you need about 15 minutes cooking per pound of turkey. For a 20 lb. turkey, I go 4 to 4-1/2 hours. Leave your self some wiggle room, the turkey will happily wait under its warm foil wrap. Your guests are not likely to be so patient.

Now we have our beautiful cooked turkey. Remove the bird to carving board (preferably one with a well to collect juices). Allow some time for your guests to ohh and ahh and admire your bird. Then let the designated carver ohh and ahh and admire your bird. Then let the designated carver go to work. Pour the juices from the roasting pan into a measuring cup, or one of those neat gravy separators if you have one. Let the juice settle for a bit, skim off the fat, and add the delicious juices to your gravy.


Whisk the balsamic vinegar & olive oil together in a small bowl. Chop 4 sprigs of rosemary & 4 springs of thyme, add to the bowl with the steak seasoning & crushed garlic.

Brush this mixture over the turkey breast.

Place the two remaining sprigs of rosemary & thyme on top of the turkey.

Weave the bacon slices together over the turkey.

Tuck the bacon under the turkey. Make sure the ends of the rosemary and thyme sprigs slightly stick out at the end for easy removal after the turkey has baked.

Place the bacon wrapped turkey on top of a wire rack on a foil-lined baking sheet.

Brush any extra herb rub on top of the bacon.

Place in the oven and bake for 1 hour (or until the turkey breast reaches 165° inside).

Remove the sprigs of rosemary & thyme from under the bacon and slice the turkey.

O-M-G! For real, the best bacon I’ve ever eaten in my life!

Salty, garlic, herb, crispy, bacon goodness!

This recipe is also another great addition to my Gluten Free Thanksgiving menu!


Traditional, Herb-Roasted Turkey with Crispy Bacon

Golden, crispy skin, and a moist interior are the hallmarks of Thanksgiving turkey perfection. Carving time is the most highly anticipated event during the holiday, and this recipe ensures that you will live up to expectations! The addition of crispy bacon adds flavor to the turkey and creates an attractive, crispy crown for the bronzed turkey.

Makes: 8 servings
Prep time: 30 minutes
Cooking time: 4 hours

1 (12 pound / 5.5 kg) turkey (giblets reserved)

1 tablespoon fresh thyme, chopped

1 tablespoon fresh rosemary, chopped

1 stick unsalted butter, softened

3 large carrots, roughly chopped

1 ½ cups (360 ml) white wine for basting and 1 ½ cups (360 ml) for the gravy

3 cups (720 ml) chicken stock

1 tablespoon cornstarch dissolved in 2 tablespoons water

1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

16 slices good-quality smoked bacon

Brining your turkey

For best results, brine your turkey ahead of time. Brining results in extra moist meat. Use a container big enough to allow you to fully submerge the turkey and pour in enough brine to cover the bird. Use 4 tablespoons of salt for every quart (4 cups/900ml) of water you use. Add any herbs and additional flavorings you like, such as bunches of thyme and rosemary, a few tablespoons of black peppercorns, and some bay leaves. Let the turkey soak in the brine for 16 to 18 hours, in the refrigerator, before cooking.


Perre’s Bacon-Blanketed, Herb Roasted Turkey

Photo courtesy of The Runaway Spoon

This is the turkey. I’ve been perfecting this for many years now. I must say, it is a showstopper, and delicious to boot, because I treat it well. I send my turkey to a bacon spa. It gets a salt scrub, a bacon butter deep tissue massage, a hand-woven bacon spa robe, some time in the sauna and a little tanning to finish it off.

I’ve got a set of instructions here, more than a recipe, but this way there is enough detail to produce a beautiful bird.

I usually cook an 18 – 20 pound turkey. Not because I have a huge family, but because I like Thanksgiving leftovers. I always buy a fresh, never frozen turkey of the best quality I can afford. If you buy a frozen turkey, you need to get it in advance and leave plenty of time for thawing. You can do a computer search for the proper method. My methods below are for a big bird, but easily adapt to a smaller one.

  • A large plastic bag
  • A platter or pan that fits the turkey in the fridge
  • Kitchen twine
  • A roasting pan that fits the turkey (and fits in your oven. Check. This is important.)
  • A probe-style meat thermometer
  • A turkey
  • Lots of kosher salt
  • 1 ½ pounds bacon
  • ½ pound butter
  • Fresh herbs: sage, thyme, oregano, parsley, marjoram, rosemary
  • Roasting vegetables: carrots, celery, onions, leeks, apples

I dry brine my turkey for a juicy bird. I used to wet brine, which involved removing drawers from my fridge and stuffing turkey into a large stockpot full of salted water. That is a lot of trouble. Here’s my easy solution that makes for a lovely moist turkey.

Start the brine 2 to 3 days before Thanksgiving. Remove all the interior parts from the bird. Discard them or use them for stock, or the giblets for gravy. Wash the bird well, inside and out. Place the bird in a great big plastic bag. Cookware stores sell fancy “brining bags” but a cheap browning bag from the grocery works just as well, or a big ziptop bag. Go to town rubbing kosher salt all over the gobbler, inside and out. Use a lot of salt. Wash your hands. Tie the bag closed and place it on a platter or pan and put it in the fridge for up to two days. I do this on Tuesday, butter it up on Wednesday for cooking on Thursday. Thoroughly wash the sink you rinsed the turkey in. Right now.

Now we work on the flavor and added juiciness. I tinkered with this recipe for many years, until I hit on just the right method. I have always rubbed butter on roasted chicken or turkey, or covered it in bacon to keep the bird moist. For a big mama gobbler, I double down.

In a food processor, blend together ½ pound raw bacon slices, ½ pound butter and generous handfuls of fresh herbs. I like a lot of sage, some parsley, oregano, thyme, marjoram and maybe rosemary. A packet and a half of “poultry herbs” works well. Blend all this until you have a smooth paste. You can make this ahead and store the bacon butter in an airtight container for up to five days.

We eat our big meal at one o’clock, so I like to have everything ready to go in the morning. I prepare my bird on Wednesday evening and refrigerate it. I have a timer feature on my oven that lets me start preheating before I want to wake up, so the oven is ready for the bird when I stumble out of bed.

When you are ready to prepare the turkey, bring the bacon butter to room temperature. Take the turkey out of its salt bag and give it a good rinse. Place it breast side up on a large platter or pan that will fit in the fridge. Wash the sink you rinsed the turkey in. Now. If your turkey comes with a pop-up timer, remove it now. It’s useless. Wash your hands, remove your rings and watch and gently separate the skin from the flesh. Lift the skin by the cavity and gently slide your hands under the skin. It will pull away from the flesh. Keep going to get the skin opened up all the way to the neck and over the legs. Try not to tear the skin, but don’t fall apart if you do. It’s not a big deal. Now take big fistfuls of butter and rub it up under the skin and overthe flesh. Use about ¾ quarters of the bacon butter under the flesh. Pat theskin down and press the butter into a pretty even layer under the skin. Rub the remaining butter over the outside of the bird, paying particular attention to the legs, which will not be covered by the bacon blanket.

There is nothing like presenting a beautiful bird to your guests at Thanksgiving, and if I may say so, this is a stunner. But the bacon is not only decorative, it amps up the juiciness of the meat and flavors the juices for the gravy. I use thick cut bacon, the best I can find. I don’t use any kind of artificially flavored bacon. My big babies use about a pound of bacon.

I think the picture really says it all. I weave the bacon strips into a lattice. It’s kind of like making those construction paper placemats from kindergarten. Lay one strip crosswise over the breast, then one lengthwise. Keep going, folding up the strips already placed to fit the new ones under. The bacon will shrink when you cook the bird, so place the strips close together and use as many as you can fit. Tie the legs of the bird together with kitchen twine. When you’ve got the bacon all woven, wash your hands thoroughly, put the bird in the fridge, fix yourself a bourbon and collapse on the sofa.

As I said, we do the meal for lunch, and I am not a morning person, so I do as much ahead as possible. With the turkey ready to go and the oven heated to 450 degrees, I get ready to roast. Remember, remove one rack and place the other in the right position to fit the pan with the bird. You don’t want to get everything hot, then have to move things around. I like good, flavorful juices from the bird to add to gravy. That really is the only thing that makes gravy worth serving. My roasting technique creates good juices.

Line the deep roasting that fits your bird with several layers of foil. It never makes clean up a breeze, but it helps. If you have a rack that fits a deep roasting pan, great. I use a grid that is technically a cooling rack. No rack, nor problem. Just set the bird on the vegetables as follows. Cover the bottom of the roasting dish with a thick layer of aromatic root vegetables. Whole vegetables, don’t’ peel or chop, just remove the paper from onions and the tops from carrots. I use carrots, celery, leeks, onions and a couple of apples cut in half. Stuff an apple and an onion into the cavity of the bird. Tuck some fresh sage leaves and any other herbs you have around the bird. Place the rack over the vegetables if you are using one, don’t worry if it’s wobbly, or just put the bird on the vegetables directly. Take a piece of foil and mold it to make a shield to cover the bird if it starts to brown too much later. Remove the molded piece of foil to a safe place. It is really hard to properly cover a hot turkey in a hot oven. Roast the turkey at 450° for 30 minutes, then turn the heat down to 375° for the rest of the cooking. I highly recommend that you make the small investment in a probe meat thermometer, one with a probe to stick in the turkey and a long cord that plugs into a counter unit. Gently stick the probe into a thick part of the breast, carefully sliding it between an opening in the bacon blanket. Make sure you don’t’ go so deep you hit the bone. You want the turkey to be cooked to 165°. I usually set the thermometer to 155°, remove the turkey from the oven and cover the whole pan with foil. I let it rest until it reaches 165°. If the turkey and the bacon start to get too brown before the meat is cooked, cover it with your prepared foil armor. Generally, you need about 15 minutes cooking per pound of turkey. For a 20 pound turkey, I go 4 to 4 ½ hours. Leave your self some wiggle room, the turkey will happily wait under its warm foil wrap. Your guests are not likely to be so patient.

Now we have our beautiful cooked turkey. Remove the bird to carving board (preferably one with a well to collect juices). Allow some time for your guests to ohh and ahh and admire your bird. Then let the designated carver go to work. Pour the juices from the roasting pan into a measuring cup, or one of those neat gravy separators if you have one. Let the juice settle for a bit, skim off the fat, and add the delicious juices to your gravy.


Rub the turkey all over with the salt. It will seem like a lot of salt. It's okay, most of it will fall off before it ever sees the inside of the oven. Rub some under the skin on the breast and thighs, and all over the bird and inside the cavities.

Put the turkey in a large bowl or roasting pan, cover, and chill for 24 to 72 hours. This pre-salting will help the bird be flavorful and hold onto its own natural juices when you roast it.

A day before you plan to cook the turkey, uncover it, pour off any juices in the bottom of the bowl or pan, pat it dry, and chill uncovered. Leaving the turkey uncovered will help the skin dry out a bit which will help you get that wonderfully crispy skin we all love on a roasted bird.

Preheat oven to 400 F. Pat the turkey dry. If using the sage, work the sage leaves under the skin on the breasts and thighs.

Rub the turkey all over with the butter.

Place the celery stalks in the roasting pan—these will keep the turkey raised off the bottom of the pan without the hassle of a roasting rack, but you can also use one instead.

Lay the bacon, pancetta, or prosciutto all over the turkey breast. They will help protect the white meat from getting overcooked, naturally baste the meat as it cooks, and provide the chef with a lovely little snack before having to carve the bird.

Put 1/2 cup of water in the bottom of the pan and put the whole thing in the oven.

After 30 minutes, reduce heat to 350 F and gently baste the turkey, being careful to not disturb the bacon, with 1/2 cup of the port or stock. Repeat basting every half hour, using the pan juices when you run out of port or stock.

Roast until a thermometer reads 170 F at the base of the thigh or 160 F at the thickest part of the breast.

Remove turkey from the oven, tent with foil, and let sit in a warm place for at least 30 minutes and up to an hour before carving. This time will allow the meat to finish cooking, let the juices settle back into the meat, and give you time to make the gravy and finish up the rest of the meal.


Recipe Summary

  • 3 strips thick-cut bacon
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons minced garlic
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh sage
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons chopped fresh rosemary
  • 1 teaspoon chopped fresh oregano
  • 1 teaspoon chopped fresh thyme
  • 3 tablespoons unsalted butter, softened
  • 2 tablespoons coarse salt
  • 1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 whole turkey breast (5 1/2 to 6 pounds), rinsed and patted dry

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Line a shallow roasting pan or baking dish with parchment paper-lined aluminum foil.

Place bacon in a medium skillet over medium heat cook until bacon is crisp. Transfer bacon to a paper towel-lined plate to drain, reserving 1 tablespoon bacon fat. Let bacon cool.

Finely chop bacon and transfer to a small bowl, along with garlic, sage, rosemary, oregano, thyme, butter, 1 teaspoon salt, and 1/2 teaspoon pepper. Using a small spoon, mix until a paste is formed.

Using your fingertips, gently loosen the skin on both sides of the turkey breast so that it is separated from the flesh. Divide herb paste in half and gently spread half of the paste between each half of the breast. Season turkey with remaining teaspoon salt and 1/2 teaspoon pepper. Brush skin with reserved bacon fat.

Place turkey in prepared pan and roast, uncovered, until a thermometer inserted into the thickest portion of the breast reaches 165 degrees, about 1 hour to 1 hour and 15 minutes. Remove turkey from oven and let rest 20 minutes before carving. Serve with any pan drippings.


Bacon Wrapped Herb Roasted Turkey

We are so excited to be partnering with our friends at Jones Dairy Farm to bring you the most amazing turkey ever. How do you take your turkey to the next level? Easy you incorporate one of my favorite ingredients: Bacon.

This is the most amazing turkey I have ever eaten. Ever! Imagine the most flavorful herb roasted turkey you have ever eaten, wrapped in bacon and cooked to perfection. It all ends with an amazingly crisp bacon coating on top of moist, tender and flavorful turkey. The bacon and herbs infuse into the turkey to create this sumptuous, glorious turkey that is utterly life changing.

I have been enjoying my prized herb roasted turkey for years. It is simply made with an amazing blend of herbs and butter that is slathered all over the turkey and under the skin. It comes out of the oven perfectly cooked, tender and flavorful. You might even think that it couldn't possibly get any better.


Until, we are in the middle of our Bacon Spectacular Thanksgiving celebration with Cheesy Bacon Green Bean Casserole, Slow Cooker Cheesy Bacon Potato Casserole, Traditional Bacon and Sausage Herb Stuffing, and Sausage, Cranberry and Apple Stuffing (which technically has sausage in it but it is the best stuffing ever. ). What could possibly complete this amazing menu?

Oh yes, that's right a bacon wrapped turkey. It is as amazing as it looks. Check out the recipe for some fantastic tips to make the bacon wrapping super easy.

I will let you all know that you can pick up Jones Dairy Farm products at your local retailer. The company’s products are distributed nationwide, so be sure to check out their product locator to see where you can pick some up. If you’re looking for the breakfast sausage, it’s in the freezer section!

With love from our Simple Kitchen to yours.

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Recipe Summary

  • 1 turkey (about 12 pounds), thawed if frozen, rinsed and patted dry
  • 1/2 cup chopped parsley
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh rosemary, plus 3 sprigs
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh sage leaves
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme leaves
  • 8 cloves garlic, finely chopped (3 tablespoons)
  • 5 tablespoons olive oil
  • Coarse salt and ground pepper
  • 2 lemons, poked all over with a fork
  • 1 quart apple cider

Preheat oven to 350 degrees with rack in lowest position. Remove packet of giblets and neck from cavity. Discard liver. Rinse remaining giblets and neck refrigerate until ready to make broth.

Turn turkey on its back and bend wing tips forward and underneath neck cavity of bird so they stay in place (you may have to break the bones).

In a small bowl, combine parsley, rosemary, sage, thyme, garlic, 4 tablespoons oil, 1 teaspoon salt, and 1/2 teaspoon pepper. Using your fingers, carefully loosen skin of breast and around thighs and rub herb mixture under skin of both.

Season cavity with salt and pepper and loosely fill with lemons and rosemary sprigs. Using cotton kitchen twine, tie legs together so bird retains its shape and moisture during cooking.

Pour cider in bottom of pan. Set roasting rack on top. Lift turkey onto rack, breast side up rub with remaining tablespoon oil season generously with salt and pepper. Tent turkey loosely with foil. Roast 1 hour. Uncover and continue to roast, basting frequently with pan juices, until an instant read thermometer inserted into thickest part of thigh (avoiding bone) registers 170 degrees, 2 1/2 to 3 hours more. (Temperature will rise about 10 degrees as turkey rests.) Tent with foil if browning too quickly add water if pan becomes dry. Cover loosely with foil, and let stand 30 minutes before carving. Serve with roasted vegetables.


Recipe Summary

  • 1 (12 pound) whole turkey
  • ¾ cup olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons garlic powder
  • 2 teaspoons dried basil
  • 1 teaspoon ground sage
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • ½ teaspoon black pepper
  • 2 cups water

Preheat oven to 325 degrees F (165 degrees C). Clean turkey (discard giblets and organs), and place in a roasting pan with a lid.

In a small bowl, combine olive oil, garlic powder, dried basil, ground sage, salt, and black pepper. Using a basting brush, apply the mixture to the outside of the uncooked turkey. Pour water into the bottom of the roasting pan, and cover.

Bake for 3 to 3 1/2 hours, or until the internal temperature of the thickest part of the thigh measures 180 degrees F (82 degrees C). Remove bird from oven, and allow to stand for about 30 minutes before carving.


Directions

Step 1
Step 2

SHAKE flour inside a Turkey Sized Reynolds® Oven Bag and place in a large roasting pan at least 2 inches deep. Spray inside of bag with nonstick spray to reduce sticking, if desired.

Step 3

ADD vegetables to oven bag. Remove neck and giblets from turkey. Rinse turkey pat dry. Brush turkey with oil. Combine sage, thyme, rosemary and seasoned salt. Sprinkle and rub herb mixture over turkey, turning to coat evenly.

Step 4

PLACE turkey in oven bag on top of vegetables.

Step 5

CLOSE oven bag with nylon tie cut six 1/2-inch slits in top. Insert meat thermometer through slit in bag into thickest part of inner thigh. Tuck ends of bag in pan.

Step 6

BAKE 2 to 2 1/2 hours for a 12 to 16 lb. turkey, 2 1/2 to 3 hours for a 16 to 20 lb. turkey, and 3 to 3 1/2 hours for a 20 to 24 lb. turkey, or until meat thermometer reads 180°F. For easy slicing, let stand in oven bag 15 minutes before opening.


Watch the video: Bacon Wrapped Turkey TenderLoin (January 2022).