Traditional recipes

Registry Basics: Pots and Pans

Registry Basics: Pots and Pans

Essential equipment to put on your wedding registry to properly equip your “new” kitchen.

Congratulations! You’ve found your special someone and maybe even picked a date and booked a venue. Now comes the fun part for those who love to entertain: building your registry.

While many of us dream that dear Aunt Agnes won’t be able to resist gifting a complete collection of chef-quality pots and pans, it’s best to begin the process with those items you can’t do without. The fluff (like that bagel slicer…) can come later.

To begin, let’s talk pots and pans and what the home cook and entertaining ingénue really needs in his or her home arsenal.

Click here to see the Registry Basics: Pots and Pans Slideshow.


6 Pots and Pans Every Home Cook Needs

Learn which cooking pots are essential to becoming a better cook.

I married a serial pot-dirtier. He cooks, I clean. And clean, and clean. To be fair, it&aposs hard to clean as you go when you&aposre preparing different dishes on the stove, in the oven and on the counter. Still, as I wash up in my husband&aposs wake, I can empathize with the 25 percent of Americans who, according to a new study, don&apost cook because they want to avoid dirtying their kitchens.

One-pot meals are just the thing to help minimize the mess in this already-extra-busy season. I love having just one thing to wash between dinner and Jeopardy. Having a few good-quality pots at your disposal puts you on the fast track to dinners that are just as easy to clean up after as they are to make.

-Wendy Ruopp, Managing Editor

There are three types of skillets that every cook should have: stainless, nonstick and cast-iron. Nonstick skillets allow you to use less oil, and cook delicate foods like eggs without fear of sticking. Be sure to look for a nonstick skillet made without PTFE and PFOA: these pans are marketed as "green" or "eco-friendly" and have coatings that won&apost break down when used over high heat. Cast-iron skillets are a tried-and-true favorite because you can cook with them over high heat and put them in the oven safely. And a stainless skillet made out of heavy material, which conducts heat evenly and will last for years, is a worthwhile investment. It&aposs your go-to pan for everything from quick saut vegetables to seared pork chops.


6 Pots and Pans Every Home Cook Needs

Learn which cooking pots are essential to becoming a better cook.

I married a serial pot-dirtier. He cooks, I clean. And clean, and clean. To be fair, it&aposs hard to clean as you go when you&aposre preparing different dishes on the stove, in the oven and on the counter. Still, as I wash up in my husband&aposs wake, I can empathize with the 25 percent of Americans who, according to a new study, don&apost cook because they want to avoid dirtying their kitchens.

One-pot meals are just the thing to help minimize the mess in this already-extra-busy season. I love having just one thing to wash between dinner and Jeopardy. Having a few good-quality pots at your disposal puts you on the fast track to dinners that are just as easy to clean up after as they are to make.

-Wendy Ruopp, Managing Editor

There are three types of skillets that every cook should have: stainless, nonstick and cast-iron. Nonstick skillets allow you to use less oil, and cook delicate foods like eggs without fear of sticking. Be sure to look for a nonstick skillet made without PTFE and PFOA: these pans are marketed as "green" or "eco-friendly" and have coatings that won&apost break down when used over high heat. Cast-iron skillets are a tried-and-true favorite because you can cook with them over high heat and put them in the oven safely. And a stainless skillet made out of heavy material, which conducts heat evenly and will last for years, is a worthwhile investment. It&aposs your go-to pan for everything from quick saut vegetables to seared pork chops.


6 Pots and Pans Every Home Cook Needs

Learn which cooking pots are essential to becoming a better cook.

I married a serial pot-dirtier. He cooks, I clean. And clean, and clean. To be fair, it&aposs hard to clean as you go when you&aposre preparing different dishes on the stove, in the oven and on the counter. Still, as I wash up in my husband&aposs wake, I can empathize with the 25 percent of Americans who, according to a new study, don&apost cook because they want to avoid dirtying their kitchens.

One-pot meals are just the thing to help minimize the mess in this already-extra-busy season. I love having just one thing to wash between dinner and Jeopardy. Having a few good-quality pots at your disposal puts you on the fast track to dinners that are just as easy to clean up after as they are to make.

-Wendy Ruopp, Managing Editor

There are three types of skillets that every cook should have: stainless, nonstick and cast-iron. Nonstick skillets allow you to use less oil, and cook delicate foods like eggs without fear of sticking. Be sure to look for a nonstick skillet made without PTFE and PFOA: these pans are marketed as "green" or "eco-friendly" and have coatings that won&apost break down when used over high heat. Cast-iron skillets are a tried-and-true favorite because you can cook with them over high heat and put them in the oven safely. And a stainless skillet made out of heavy material, which conducts heat evenly and will last for years, is a worthwhile investment. It&aposs your go-to pan for everything from quick saut vegetables to seared pork chops.


6 Pots and Pans Every Home Cook Needs

Learn which cooking pots are essential to becoming a better cook.

I married a serial pot-dirtier. He cooks, I clean. And clean, and clean. To be fair, it&aposs hard to clean as you go when you&aposre preparing different dishes on the stove, in the oven and on the counter. Still, as I wash up in my husband&aposs wake, I can empathize with the 25 percent of Americans who, according to a new study, don&apost cook because they want to avoid dirtying their kitchens.

One-pot meals are just the thing to help minimize the mess in this already-extra-busy season. I love having just one thing to wash between dinner and Jeopardy. Having a few good-quality pots at your disposal puts you on the fast track to dinners that are just as easy to clean up after as they are to make.

-Wendy Ruopp, Managing Editor

There are three types of skillets that every cook should have: stainless, nonstick and cast-iron. Nonstick skillets allow you to use less oil, and cook delicate foods like eggs without fear of sticking. Be sure to look for a nonstick skillet made without PTFE and PFOA: these pans are marketed as "green" or "eco-friendly" and have coatings that won&apost break down when used over high heat. Cast-iron skillets are a tried-and-true favorite because you can cook with them over high heat and put them in the oven safely. And a stainless skillet made out of heavy material, which conducts heat evenly and will last for years, is a worthwhile investment. It&aposs your go-to pan for everything from quick saut vegetables to seared pork chops.


6 Pots and Pans Every Home Cook Needs

Learn which cooking pots are essential to becoming a better cook.

I married a serial pot-dirtier. He cooks, I clean. And clean, and clean. To be fair, it&aposs hard to clean as you go when you&aposre preparing different dishes on the stove, in the oven and on the counter. Still, as I wash up in my husband&aposs wake, I can empathize with the 25 percent of Americans who, according to a new study, don&apost cook because they want to avoid dirtying their kitchens.

One-pot meals are just the thing to help minimize the mess in this already-extra-busy season. I love having just one thing to wash between dinner and Jeopardy. Having a few good-quality pots at your disposal puts you on the fast track to dinners that are just as easy to clean up after as they are to make.

-Wendy Ruopp, Managing Editor

There are three types of skillets that every cook should have: stainless, nonstick and cast-iron. Nonstick skillets allow you to use less oil, and cook delicate foods like eggs without fear of sticking. Be sure to look for a nonstick skillet made without PTFE and PFOA: these pans are marketed as "green" or "eco-friendly" and have coatings that won&apost break down when used over high heat. Cast-iron skillets are a tried-and-true favorite because you can cook with them over high heat and put them in the oven safely. And a stainless skillet made out of heavy material, which conducts heat evenly and will last for years, is a worthwhile investment. It&aposs your go-to pan for everything from quick saut vegetables to seared pork chops.


6 Pots and Pans Every Home Cook Needs

Learn which cooking pots are essential to becoming a better cook.

I married a serial pot-dirtier. He cooks, I clean. And clean, and clean. To be fair, it&aposs hard to clean as you go when you&aposre preparing different dishes on the stove, in the oven and on the counter. Still, as I wash up in my husband&aposs wake, I can empathize with the 25 percent of Americans who, according to a new study, don&apost cook because they want to avoid dirtying their kitchens.

One-pot meals are just the thing to help minimize the mess in this already-extra-busy season. I love having just one thing to wash between dinner and Jeopardy. Having a few good-quality pots at your disposal puts you on the fast track to dinners that are just as easy to clean up after as they are to make.

-Wendy Ruopp, Managing Editor

There are three types of skillets that every cook should have: stainless, nonstick and cast-iron. Nonstick skillets allow you to use less oil, and cook delicate foods like eggs without fear of sticking. Be sure to look for a nonstick skillet made without PTFE and PFOA: these pans are marketed as "green" or "eco-friendly" and have coatings that won&apost break down when used over high heat. Cast-iron skillets are a tried-and-true favorite because you can cook with them over high heat and put them in the oven safely. And a stainless skillet made out of heavy material, which conducts heat evenly and will last for years, is a worthwhile investment. It&aposs your go-to pan for everything from quick saut vegetables to seared pork chops.


6 Pots and Pans Every Home Cook Needs

Learn which cooking pots are essential to becoming a better cook.

I married a serial pot-dirtier. He cooks, I clean. And clean, and clean. To be fair, it&aposs hard to clean as you go when you&aposre preparing different dishes on the stove, in the oven and on the counter. Still, as I wash up in my husband&aposs wake, I can empathize with the 25 percent of Americans who, according to a new study, don&apost cook because they want to avoid dirtying their kitchens.

One-pot meals are just the thing to help minimize the mess in this already-extra-busy season. I love having just one thing to wash between dinner and Jeopardy. Having a few good-quality pots at your disposal puts you on the fast track to dinners that are just as easy to clean up after as they are to make.

-Wendy Ruopp, Managing Editor

There are three types of skillets that every cook should have: stainless, nonstick and cast-iron. Nonstick skillets allow you to use less oil, and cook delicate foods like eggs without fear of sticking. Be sure to look for a nonstick skillet made without PTFE and PFOA: these pans are marketed as "green" or "eco-friendly" and have coatings that won&apost break down when used over high heat. Cast-iron skillets are a tried-and-true favorite because you can cook with them over high heat and put them in the oven safely. And a stainless skillet made out of heavy material, which conducts heat evenly and will last for years, is a worthwhile investment. It&aposs your go-to pan for everything from quick saut vegetables to seared pork chops.


6 Pots and Pans Every Home Cook Needs

Learn which cooking pots are essential to becoming a better cook.

I married a serial pot-dirtier. He cooks, I clean. And clean, and clean. To be fair, it&aposs hard to clean as you go when you&aposre preparing different dishes on the stove, in the oven and on the counter. Still, as I wash up in my husband&aposs wake, I can empathize with the 25 percent of Americans who, according to a new study, don&apost cook because they want to avoid dirtying their kitchens.

One-pot meals are just the thing to help minimize the mess in this already-extra-busy season. I love having just one thing to wash between dinner and Jeopardy. Having a few good-quality pots at your disposal puts you on the fast track to dinners that are just as easy to clean up after as they are to make.

-Wendy Ruopp, Managing Editor

There are three types of skillets that every cook should have: stainless, nonstick and cast-iron. Nonstick skillets allow you to use less oil, and cook delicate foods like eggs without fear of sticking. Be sure to look for a nonstick skillet made without PTFE and PFOA: these pans are marketed as "green" or "eco-friendly" and have coatings that won&apost break down when used over high heat. Cast-iron skillets are a tried-and-true favorite because you can cook with them over high heat and put them in the oven safely. And a stainless skillet made out of heavy material, which conducts heat evenly and will last for years, is a worthwhile investment. It&aposs your go-to pan for everything from quick saut vegetables to seared pork chops.


6 Pots and Pans Every Home Cook Needs

Learn which cooking pots are essential to becoming a better cook.

I married a serial pot-dirtier. He cooks, I clean. And clean, and clean. To be fair, it&aposs hard to clean as you go when you&aposre preparing different dishes on the stove, in the oven and on the counter. Still, as I wash up in my husband&aposs wake, I can empathize with the 25 percent of Americans who, according to a new study, don&apost cook because they want to avoid dirtying their kitchens.

One-pot meals are just the thing to help minimize the mess in this already-extra-busy season. I love having just one thing to wash between dinner and Jeopardy. Having a few good-quality pots at your disposal puts you on the fast track to dinners that are just as easy to clean up after as they are to make.

-Wendy Ruopp, Managing Editor

There are three types of skillets that every cook should have: stainless, nonstick and cast-iron. Nonstick skillets allow you to use less oil, and cook delicate foods like eggs without fear of sticking. Be sure to look for a nonstick skillet made without PTFE and PFOA: these pans are marketed as "green" or "eco-friendly" and have coatings that won&apost break down when used over high heat. Cast-iron skillets are a tried-and-true favorite because you can cook with them over high heat and put them in the oven safely. And a stainless skillet made out of heavy material, which conducts heat evenly and will last for years, is a worthwhile investment. It&aposs your go-to pan for everything from quick saut vegetables to seared pork chops.


6 Pots and Pans Every Home Cook Needs

Learn which cooking pots are essential to becoming a better cook.

I married a serial pot-dirtier. He cooks, I clean. And clean, and clean. To be fair, it&aposs hard to clean as you go when you&aposre preparing different dishes on the stove, in the oven and on the counter. Still, as I wash up in my husband&aposs wake, I can empathize with the 25 percent of Americans who, according to a new study, don&apost cook because they want to avoid dirtying their kitchens.

One-pot meals are just the thing to help minimize the mess in this already-extra-busy season. I love having just one thing to wash between dinner and Jeopardy. Having a few good-quality pots at your disposal puts you on the fast track to dinners that are just as easy to clean up after as they are to make.

-Wendy Ruopp, Managing Editor

There are three types of skillets that every cook should have: stainless, nonstick and cast-iron. Nonstick skillets allow you to use less oil, and cook delicate foods like eggs without fear of sticking. Be sure to look for a nonstick skillet made without PTFE and PFOA: these pans are marketed as "green" or "eco-friendly" and have coatings that won&apost break down when used over high heat. Cast-iron skillets are a tried-and-true favorite because you can cook with them over high heat and put them in the oven safely. And a stainless skillet made out of heavy material, which conducts heat evenly and will last for years, is a worthwhile investment. It&aposs your go-to pan for everything from quick saut vegetables to seared pork chops.


Watch the video: Best Pots And Pans To Have For Every Kitchen - Kitchen Conundrums with Thomas Joseph (January 2022).