Traditional recipes

Four Recipes in Honor of Breakfast Month

Four Recipes in Honor of Breakfast Month

Eat breakfast for dinner to celebrate Breakfast Month.

Crumb cakes are also a popular breakfast pastry item that can be transformed into a satisfying and easy dinner dish.

September is National Breakfast Month, but breakfast doesn’t have to be enjoyed only in the morning. People across the country love eating breakfast for dinner, celebrating Wednesday night as “Breakfast Night.” In fact, Krusteaz’s annual breakfast survey revealed that nine out of ten (90 percent) Americans say they eat breakfast for dinner, with more than half (53 percent) enjoying breakfast night dinners once a month or more. Whether you regularly indulge in breakfast for dinner or are looking to do so more, below are four easy and delicious recipe ideas that will please anyone at the table, any time of day.

Apple Pie Pancake Rolls

Classic pancakes are always a favorite, but there are so many other creative options! Using buttermilk pancake mix, you can create out of this world Apple Pie Pancake Rolls that are light, fluffy and filled with delicious apple filling.

Blueberry Pancake Cake

While cake for dinner may not be allowed in your home, this Blueberry Pancake Cake sure is! Blueberry Pancake Mix combined with berries, brown sugar and syrup bakes to form a delicious breakfast cake that can be enjoyed any time of day.

Caramel Apple Crumb Cake

Crumb cakes are also a popular breakfast pastry item that can be transformed into a satisfying and easy dinner dish. Mix chopped apples, caramel sauce, yogurt and cinnamon with your cake mix for a pan of warm, sweet goodness.

Easy Pancake Mix Funnel Cakes

Funnel cakes are often found at fairs and carnivals but you can make them right at home in your own kitchen. All you need is buttermilk pancake mix, a hot skillet and a squeeze bottle to make these golden treats. Serve with a dusting of powdered sugar and enjoy!

For more ideas and recipes, visit www.Krusteaz.com and get acquainted with the Baker's Dozen.


24 Easy Ramadan Recipes That Will Keep You Energized All Month Long

As part of the holy month of Ramadan, which started last week, millions of Muslims around the world will abstain from food and water between dawn and dusk.

Muslims keeping the fast typically wake up before dawn and eat a "suhoor" meal, which means they need to make something quickly that will also keep them nourished throughout the day. The "iftar," or evening meal, comes with its own challenges -- families and friends usually gather for big celebratory dinners, which can often be filled with tempting fried foods.

Not everyone knows how to fast well, admits Amanda Saab, a contestant on Fox’s cooking competition “Masterchef.”

The first Muslim-American to compete on the show, Saab knows a thing or two about the challenge of cooking flavorful food on a strict deadline, as well as about the Ramadan fast. Her advice about breaking the fast at iftar after a long day?

"Don't overdo it. Traditionally we have a large spread during Ramadan to break the fast," the 26-year-old Seattle native told HuffPost Religion over the phone. "But stick to a few areas -- a carb, a protein, fiber.”

Nour Zibdeh, a registered dietitian based in Virginia, abides by the same principles.

While fasting has numerous health benefits -- such as giving the digestive tract time to rest and detox and allowing the body to tap into the energy stored up inside fat tissues -- Zibdeh says some people experience the opposite.

“People think that you lose weight during fasting, but some people tend to overeat high-calorie foods and that compensates for the fasting hours,” Zibdeh told HuffPost. “And some people do actually gain weight.”

Saab’s biggest tip is to “keep it simple” by making sure each meal has complex, non-refined carbs, a healthy protein and plenty of color.

“Do not go overboard, try and not waste food," Saab advised. "And share with your neighbors, as that is the true essence of the month."

Saab and Zibdeh shared a number of easy recipes for both suhoor and iftar, including some for those who are in a rush and others for people who have a little bit more time to spend at the stove. Take a look at the recipes below.

Mix a cup of plain Greek or regular yogurt with one tablespoon chia seeds, two tablespoons pumpkin seeds and three chopped dates.

Chop up a hard-boiled egg and combine with half an avocado and two tablespoons of salsa. Eat with a fork and munch on blueberries on the side.

"Use Chobani Greek Yogurt for extra protein and top with chia seeds for added fiber to help keep you feeling full."

"Quinoa breakfast bowls are easy to assemble in your morning stupor. Prepare the potassium, calcium and fiber-packed quinoa in large batches at the beginning of the week. Then add your toppings!"

An easy way to get a cup of vegetables and healthy oils like omega-3 or coconut oil. Add a scoop of protein to balance the smoothie and make you stay full longer.

This is a simple yet complete meal. Watermelons and peppers have a high water content, which helps improve hydration.

"A bland canvas packed with fiber and protein! Add your favorite fruits, nuts and granolas for the perfect, quick Suhoor! I like to zap it in the microwave for 30 seconds so it is nice and warm when I dig in."

Yogurt is filling, thanks to its protein content. Prepare and store the fruit in a container in advance to speed up the process at Suhoor.

Dates are a common Ramadan fruit, one that was eaten by the Prophet Muhammad. Balance the natural sugars in dates with almonds and chia seeds in this date bars recipe. The additional proteins and fats will make you feel full longer. The cocoa in this recipe is also bound to make you happy.

"Toast up some bread, add some avocado and eggs and enjoy! If you want to impress your family at 3 a.m. and make them think they woke up in one of Gordon Ramsay’s restaurants, add some chive blossoms."

"You can’t go wrong with eggs . If poaching is too intimidating, simply scramble. Serve with your favorite fruit or whole wheat tortilla."

Make this once and eat it over a few days. It’s easy to reheat in the microwave so you don’t spend time cooking in the middle of the night. Eggs and cheese are an excellent source of protein and it’s an easy way to add veggies to your day. Also try it with spinach, bell peppers, tomatoes or olives.

Why not eat a salad for suhoor? Hard-boil a few eggs, depending on how many people are in your household. You can eat this over few days -- just store the boiled eggs in the fridge in their shells.

Make this mix early in the week and eat it over a few nights. Muesli is a good source of fiber and can be low in sugar if you choose your ingredients correctly. Try this for a cold suhoor during Ramadan. Commercial muesli is expensive, but you can make your own using this recipe.


24 Easy Ramadan Recipes That Will Keep You Energized All Month Long

As part of the holy month of Ramadan, which started last week, millions of Muslims around the world will abstain from food and water between dawn and dusk.

Muslims keeping the fast typically wake up before dawn and eat a "suhoor" meal, which means they need to make something quickly that will also keep them nourished throughout the day. The "iftar," or evening meal, comes with its own challenges -- families and friends usually gather for big celebratory dinners, which can often be filled with tempting fried foods.

Not everyone knows how to fast well, admits Amanda Saab, a contestant on Fox’s cooking competition “Masterchef.”

The first Muslim-American to compete on the show, Saab knows a thing or two about the challenge of cooking flavorful food on a strict deadline, as well as about the Ramadan fast. Her advice about breaking the fast at iftar after a long day?

"Don't overdo it. Traditionally we have a large spread during Ramadan to break the fast," the 26-year-old Seattle native told HuffPost Religion over the phone. "But stick to a few areas -- a carb, a protein, fiber.”

Nour Zibdeh, a registered dietitian based in Virginia, abides by the same principles.

While fasting has numerous health benefits -- such as giving the digestive tract time to rest and detox and allowing the body to tap into the energy stored up inside fat tissues -- Zibdeh says some people experience the opposite.

“People think that you lose weight during fasting, but some people tend to overeat high-calorie foods and that compensates for the fasting hours,” Zibdeh told HuffPost. “And some people do actually gain weight.”

Saab’s biggest tip is to “keep it simple” by making sure each meal has complex, non-refined carbs, a healthy protein and plenty of color.

“Do not go overboard, try and not waste food," Saab advised. "And share with your neighbors, as that is the true essence of the month."

Saab and Zibdeh shared a number of easy recipes for both suhoor and iftar, including some for those who are in a rush and others for people who have a little bit more time to spend at the stove. Take a look at the recipes below.

Mix a cup of plain Greek or regular yogurt with one tablespoon chia seeds, two tablespoons pumpkin seeds and three chopped dates.

Chop up a hard-boiled egg and combine with half an avocado and two tablespoons of salsa. Eat with a fork and munch on blueberries on the side.

"Use Chobani Greek Yogurt for extra protein and top with chia seeds for added fiber to help keep you feeling full."

"Quinoa breakfast bowls are easy to assemble in your morning stupor. Prepare the potassium, calcium and fiber-packed quinoa in large batches at the beginning of the week. Then add your toppings!"

An easy way to get a cup of vegetables and healthy oils like omega-3 or coconut oil. Add a scoop of protein to balance the smoothie and make you stay full longer.

This is a simple yet complete meal. Watermelons and peppers have a high water content, which helps improve hydration.

"A bland canvas packed with fiber and protein! Add your favorite fruits, nuts and granolas for the perfect, quick Suhoor! I like to zap it in the microwave for 30 seconds so it is nice and warm when I dig in."

Yogurt is filling, thanks to its protein content. Prepare and store the fruit in a container in advance to speed up the process at Suhoor.

Dates are a common Ramadan fruit, one that was eaten by the Prophet Muhammad. Balance the natural sugars in dates with almonds and chia seeds in this date bars recipe. The additional proteins and fats will make you feel full longer. The cocoa in this recipe is also bound to make you happy.

"Toast up some bread, add some avocado and eggs and enjoy! If you want to impress your family at 3 a.m. and make them think they woke up in one of Gordon Ramsay’s restaurants, add some chive blossoms."

"You can’t go wrong with eggs . If poaching is too intimidating, simply scramble. Serve with your favorite fruit or whole wheat tortilla."

Make this once and eat it over a few days. It’s easy to reheat in the microwave so you don’t spend time cooking in the middle of the night. Eggs and cheese are an excellent source of protein and it’s an easy way to add veggies to your day. Also try it with spinach, bell peppers, tomatoes or olives.

Why not eat a salad for suhoor? Hard-boil a few eggs, depending on how many people are in your household. You can eat this over few days -- just store the boiled eggs in the fridge in their shells.

Make this mix early in the week and eat it over a few nights. Muesli is a good source of fiber and can be low in sugar if you choose your ingredients correctly. Try this for a cold suhoor during Ramadan. Commercial muesli is expensive, but you can make your own using this recipe.


24 Easy Ramadan Recipes That Will Keep You Energized All Month Long

As part of the holy month of Ramadan, which started last week, millions of Muslims around the world will abstain from food and water between dawn and dusk.

Muslims keeping the fast typically wake up before dawn and eat a "suhoor" meal, which means they need to make something quickly that will also keep them nourished throughout the day. The "iftar," or evening meal, comes with its own challenges -- families and friends usually gather for big celebratory dinners, which can often be filled with tempting fried foods.

Not everyone knows how to fast well, admits Amanda Saab, a contestant on Fox’s cooking competition “Masterchef.”

The first Muslim-American to compete on the show, Saab knows a thing or two about the challenge of cooking flavorful food on a strict deadline, as well as about the Ramadan fast. Her advice about breaking the fast at iftar after a long day?

"Don't overdo it. Traditionally we have a large spread during Ramadan to break the fast," the 26-year-old Seattle native told HuffPost Religion over the phone. "But stick to a few areas -- a carb, a protein, fiber.”

Nour Zibdeh, a registered dietitian based in Virginia, abides by the same principles.

While fasting has numerous health benefits -- such as giving the digestive tract time to rest and detox and allowing the body to tap into the energy stored up inside fat tissues -- Zibdeh says some people experience the opposite.

“People think that you lose weight during fasting, but some people tend to overeat high-calorie foods and that compensates for the fasting hours,” Zibdeh told HuffPost. “And some people do actually gain weight.”

Saab’s biggest tip is to “keep it simple” by making sure each meal has complex, non-refined carbs, a healthy protein and plenty of color.

“Do not go overboard, try and not waste food," Saab advised. "And share with your neighbors, as that is the true essence of the month."

Saab and Zibdeh shared a number of easy recipes for both suhoor and iftar, including some for those who are in a rush and others for people who have a little bit more time to spend at the stove. Take a look at the recipes below.

Mix a cup of plain Greek or regular yogurt with one tablespoon chia seeds, two tablespoons pumpkin seeds and three chopped dates.

Chop up a hard-boiled egg and combine with half an avocado and two tablespoons of salsa. Eat with a fork and munch on blueberries on the side.

"Use Chobani Greek Yogurt for extra protein and top with chia seeds for added fiber to help keep you feeling full."

"Quinoa breakfast bowls are easy to assemble in your morning stupor. Prepare the potassium, calcium and fiber-packed quinoa in large batches at the beginning of the week. Then add your toppings!"

An easy way to get a cup of vegetables and healthy oils like omega-3 or coconut oil. Add a scoop of protein to balance the smoothie and make you stay full longer.

This is a simple yet complete meal. Watermelons and peppers have a high water content, which helps improve hydration.

"A bland canvas packed with fiber and protein! Add your favorite fruits, nuts and granolas for the perfect, quick Suhoor! I like to zap it in the microwave for 30 seconds so it is nice and warm when I dig in."

Yogurt is filling, thanks to its protein content. Prepare and store the fruit in a container in advance to speed up the process at Suhoor.

Dates are a common Ramadan fruit, one that was eaten by the Prophet Muhammad. Balance the natural sugars in dates with almonds and chia seeds in this date bars recipe. The additional proteins and fats will make you feel full longer. The cocoa in this recipe is also bound to make you happy.

"Toast up some bread, add some avocado and eggs and enjoy! If you want to impress your family at 3 a.m. and make them think they woke up in one of Gordon Ramsay’s restaurants, add some chive blossoms."

"You can’t go wrong with eggs . If poaching is too intimidating, simply scramble. Serve with your favorite fruit or whole wheat tortilla."

Make this once and eat it over a few days. It’s easy to reheat in the microwave so you don’t spend time cooking in the middle of the night. Eggs and cheese are an excellent source of protein and it’s an easy way to add veggies to your day. Also try it with spinach, bell peppers, tomatoes or olives.

Why not eat a salad for suhoor? Hard-boil a few eggs, depending on how many people are in your household. You can eat this over few days -- just store the boiled eggs in the fridge in their shells.

Make this mix early in the week and eat it over a few nights. Muesli is a good source of fiber and can be low in sugar if you choose your ingredients correctly. Try this for a cold suhoor during Ramadan. Commercial muesli is expensive, but you can make your own using this recipe.


24 Easy Ramadan Recipes That Will Keep You Energized All Month Long

As part of the holy month of Ramadan, which started last week, millions of Muslims around the world will abstain from food and water between dawn and dusk.

Muslims keeping the fast typically wake up before dawn and eat a "suhoor" meal, which means they need to make something quickly that will also keep them nourished throughout the day. The "iftar," or evening meal, comes with its own challenges -- families and friends usually gather for big celebratory dinners, which can often be filled with tempting fried foods.

Not everyone knows how to fast well, admits Amanda Saab, a contestant on Fox’s cooking competition “Masterchef.”

The first Muslim-American to compete on the show, Saab knows a thing or two about the challenge of cooking flavorful food on a strict deadline, as well as about the Ramadan fast. Her advice about breaking the fast at iftar after a long day?

"Don't overdo it. Traditionally we have a large spread during Ramadan to break the fast," the 26-year-old Seattle native told HuffPost Religion over the phone. "But stick to a few areas -- a carb, a protein, fiber.”

Nour Zibdeh, a registered dietitian based in Virginia, abides by the same principles.

While fasting has numerous health benefits -- such as giving the digestive tract time to rest and detox and allowing the body to tap into the energy stored up inside fat tissues -- Zibdeh says some people experience the opposite.

“People think that you lose weight during fasting, but some people tend to overeat high-calorie foods and that compensates for the fasting hours,” Zibdeh told HuffPost. “And some people do actually gain weight.”

Saab’s biggest tip is to “keep it simple” by making sure each meal has complex, non-refined carbs, a healthy protein and plenty of color.

“Do not go overboard, try and not waste food," Saab advised. "And share with your neighbors, as that is the true essence of the month."

Saab and Zibdeh shared a number of easy recipes for both suhoor and iftar, including some for those who are in a rush and others for people who have a little bit more time to spend at the stove. Take a look at the recipes below.

Mix a cup of plain Greek or regular yogurt with one tablespoon chia seeds, two tablespoons pumpkin seeds and three chopped dates.

Chop up a hard-boiled egg and combine with half an avocado and two tablespoons of salsa. Eat with a fork and munch on blueberries on the side.

"Use Chobani Greek Yogurt for extra protein and top with chia seeds for added fiber to help keep you feeling full."

"Quinoa breakfast bowls are easy to assemble in your morning stupor. Prepare the potassium, calcium and fiber-packed quinoa in large batches at the beginning of the week. Then add your toppings!"

An easy way to get a cup of vegetables and healthy oils like omega-3 or coconut oil. Add a scoop of protein to balance the smoothie and make you stay full longer.

This is a simple yet complete meal. Watermelons and peppers have a high water content, which helps improve hydration.

"A bland canvas packed with fiber and protein! Add your favorite fruits, nuts and granolas for the perfect, quick Suhoor! I like to zap it in the microwave for 30 seconds so it is nice and warm when I dig in."

Yogurt is filling, thanks to its protein content. Prepare and store the fruit in a container in advance to speed up the process at Suhoor.

Dates are a common Ramadan fruit, one that was eaten by the Prophet Muhammad. Balance the natural sugars in dates with almonds and chia seeds in this date bars recipe. The additional proteins and fats will make you feel full longer. The cocoa in this recipe is also bound to make you happy.

"Toast up some bread, add some avocado and eggs and enjoy! If you want to impress your family at 3 a.m. and make them think they woke up in one of Gordon Ramsay’s restaurants, add some chive blossoms."

"You can’t go wrong with eggs . If poaching is too intimidating, simply scramble. Serve with your favorite fruit or whole wheat tortilla."

Make this once and eat it over a few days. It’s easy to reheat in the microwave so you don’t spend time cooking in the middle of the night. Eggs and cheese are an excellent source of protein and it’s an easy way to add veggies to your day. Also try it with spinach, bell peppers, tomatoes or olives.

Why not eat a salad for suhoor? Hard-boil a few eggs, depending on how many people are in your household. You can eat this over few days -- just store the boiled eggs in the fridge in their shells.

Make this mix early in the week and eat it over a few nights. Muesli is a good source of fiber and can be low in sugar if you choose your ingredients correctly. Try this for a cold suhoor during Ramadan. Commercial muesli is expensive, but you can make your own using this recipe.


24 Easy Ramadan Recipes That Will Keep You Energized All Month Long

As part of the holy month of Ramadan, which started last week, millions of Muslims around the world will abstain from food and water between dawn and dusk.

Muslims keeping the fast typically wake up before dawn and eat a "suhoor" meal, which means they need to make something quickly that will also keep them nourished throughout the day. The "iftar," or evening meal, comes with its own challenges -- families and friends usually gather for big celebratory dinners, which can often be filled with tempting fried foods.

Not everyone knows how to fast well, admits Amanda Saab, a contestant on Fox’s cooking competition “Masterchef.”

The first Muslim-American to compete on the show, Saab knows a thing or two about the challenge of cooking flavorful food on a strict deadline, as well as about the Ramadan fast. Her advice about breaking the fast at iftar after a long day?

"Don't overdo it. Traditionally we have a large spread during Ramadan to break the fast," the 26-year-old Seattle native told HuffPost Religion over the phone. "But stick to a few areas -- a carb, a protein, fiber.”

Nour Zibdeh, a registered dietitian based in Virginia, abides by the same principles.

While fasting has numerous health benefits -- such as giving the digestive tract time to rest and detox and allowing the body to tap into the energy stored up inside fat tissues -- Zibdeh says some people experience the opposite.

“People think that you lose weight during fasting, but some people tend to overeat high-calorie foods and that compensates for the fasting hours,” Zibdeh told HuffPost. “And some people do actually gain weight.”

Saab’s biggest tip is to “keep it simple” by making sure each meal has complex, non-refined carbs, a healthy protein and plenty of color.

“Do not go overboard, try and not waste food," Saab advised. "And share with your neighbors, as that is the true essence of the month."

Saab and Zibdeh shared a number of easy recipes for both suhoor and iftar, including some for those who are in a rush and others for people who have a little bit more time to spend at the stove. Take a look at the recipes below.

Mix a cup of plain Greek or regular yogurt with one tablespoon chia seeds, two tablespoons pumpkin seeds and three chopped dates.

Chop up a hard-boiled egg and combine with half an avocado and two tablespoons of salsa. Eat with a fork and munch on blueberries on the side.

"Use Chobani Greek Yogurt for extra protein and top with chia seeds for added fiber to help keep you feeling full."

"Quinoa breakfast bowls are easy to assemble in your morning stupor. Prepare the potassium, calcium and fiber-packed quinoa in large batches at the beginning of the week. Then add your toppings!"

An easy way to get a cup of vegetables and healthy oils like omega-3 or coconut oil. Add a scoop of protein to balance the smoothie and make you stay full longer.

This is a simple yet complete meal. Watermelons and peppers have a high water content, which helps improve hydration.

"A bland canvas packed with fiber and protein! Add your favorite fruits, nuts and granolas for the perfect, quick Suhoor! I like to zap it in the microwave for 30 seconds so it is nice and warm when I dig in."

Yogurt is filling, thanks to its protein content. Prepare and store the fruit in a container in advance to speed up the process at Suhoor.

Dates are a common Ramadan fruit, one that was eaten by the Prophet Muhammad. Balance the natural sugars in dates with almonds and chia seeds in this date bars recipe. The additional proteins and fats will make you feel full longer. The cocoa in this recipe is also bound to make you happy.

"Toast up some bread, add some avocado and eggs and enjoy! If you want to impress your family at 3 a.m. and make them think they woke up in one of Gordon Ramsay’s restaurants, add some chive blossoms."

"You can’t go wrong with eggs . If poaching is too intimidating, simply scramble. Serve with your favorite fruit or whole wheat tortilla."

Make this once and eat it over a few days. It’s easy to reheat in the microwave so you don’t spend time cooking in the middle of the night. Eggs and cheese are an excellent source of protein and it’s an easy way to add veggies to your day. Also try it with spinach, bell peppers, tomatoes or olives.

Why not eat a salad for suhoor? Hard-boil a few eggs, depending on how many people are in your household. You can eat this over few days -- just store the boiled eggs in the fridge in their shells.

Make this mix early in the week and eat it over a few nights. Muesli is a good source of fiber and can be low in sugar if you choose your ingredients correctly. Try this for a cold suhoor during Ramadan. Commercial muesli is expensive, but you can make your own using this recipe.


24 Easy Ramadan Recipes That Will Keep You Energized All Month Long

As part of the holy month of Ramadan, which started last week, millions of Muslims around the world will abstain from food and water between dawn and dusk.

Muslims keeping the fast typically wake up before dawn and eat a "suhoor" meal, which means they need to make something quickly that will also keep them nourished throughout the day. The "iftar," or evening meal, comes with its own challenges -- families and friends usually gather for big celebratory dinners, which can often be filled with tempting fried foods.

Not everyone knows how to fast well, admits Amanda Saab, a contestant on Fox’s cooking competition “Masterchef.”

The first Muslim-American to compete on the show, Saab knows a thing or two about the challenge of cooking flavorful food on a strict deadline, as well as about the Ramadan fast. Her advice about breaking the fast at iftar after a long day?

"Don't overdo it. Traditionally we have a large spread during Ramadan to break the fast," the 26-year-old Seattle native told HuffPost Religion over the phone. "But stick to a few areas -- a carb, a protein, fiber.”

Nour Zibdeh, a registered dietitian based in Virginia, abides by the same principles.

While fasting has numerous health benefits -- such as giving the digestive tract time to rest and detox and allowing the body to tap into the energy stored up inside fat tissues -- Zibdeh says some people experience the opposite.

“People think that you lose weight during fasting, but some people tend to overeat high-calorie foods and that compensates for the fasting hours,” Zibdeh told HuffPost. “And some people do actually gain weight.”

Saab’s biggest tip is to “keep it simple” by making sure each meal has complex, non-refined carbs, a healthy protein and plenty of color.

“Do not go overboard, try and not waste food," Saab advised. "And share with your neighbors, as that is the true essence of the month."

Saab and Zibdeh shared a number of easy recipes for both suhoor and iftar, including some for those who are in a rush and others for people who have a little bit more time to spend at the stove. Take a look at the recipes below.

Mix a cup of plain Greek or regular yogurt with one tablespoon chia seeds, two tablespoons pumpkin seeds and three chopped dates.

Chop up a hard-boiled egg and combine with half an avocado and two tablespoons of salsa. Eat with a fork and munch on blueberries on the side.

"Use Chobani Greek Yogurt for extra protein and top with chia seeds for added fiber to help keep you feeling full."

"Quinoa breakfast bowls are easy to assemble in your morning stupor. Prepare the potassium, calcium and fiber-packed quinoa in large batches at the beginning of the week. Then add your toppings!"

An easy way to get a cup of vegetables and healthy oils like omega-3 or coconut oil. Add a scoop of protein to balance the smoothie and make you stay full longer.

This is a simple yet complete meal. Watermelons and peppers have a high water content, which helps improve hydration.

"A bland canvas packed with fiber and protein! Add your favorite fruits, nuts and granolas for the perfect, quick Suhoor! I like to zap it in the microwave for 30 seconds so it is nice and warm when I dig in."

Yogurt is filling, thanks to its protein content. Prepare and store the fruit in a container in advance to speed up the process at Suhoor.

Dates are a common Ramadan fruit, one that was eaten by the Prophet Muhammad. Balance the natural sugars in dates with almonds and chia seeds in this date bars recipe. The additional proteins and fats will make you feel full longer. The cocoa in this recipe is also bound to make you happy.

"Toast up some bread, add some avocado and eggs and enjoy! If you want to impress your family at 3 a.m. and make them think they woke up in one of Gordon Ramsay’s restaurants, add some chive blossoms."

"You can’t go wrong with eggs . If poaching is too intimidating, simply scramble. Serve with your favorite fruit or whole wheat tortilla."

Make this once and eat it over a few days. It’s easy to reheat in the microwave so you don’t spend time cooking in the middle of the night. Eggs and cheese are an excellent source of protein and it’s an easy way to add veggies to your day. Also try it with spinach, bell peppers, tomatoes or olives.

Why not eat a salad for suhoor? Hard-boil a few eggs, depending on how many people are in your household. You can eat this over few days -- just store the boiled eggs in the fridge in their shells.

Make this mix early in the week and eat it over a few nights. Muesli is a good source of fiber and can be low in sugar if you choose your ingredients correctly. Try this for a cold suhoor during Ramadan. Commercial muesli is expensive, but you can make your own using this recipe.


24 Easy Ramadan Recipes That Will Keep You Energized All Month Long

As part of the holy month of Ramadan, which started last week, millions of Muslims around the world will abstain from food and water between dawn and dusk.

Muslims keeping the fast typically wake up before dawn and eat a "suhoor" meal, which means they need to make something quickly that will also keep them nourished throughout the day. The "iftar," or evening meal, comes with its own challenges -- families and friends usually gather for big celebratory dinners, which can often be filled with tempting fried foods.

Not everyone knows how to fast well, admits Amanda Saab, a contestant on Fox’s cooking competition “Masterchef.”

The first Muslim-American to compete on the show, Saab knows a thing or two about the challenge of cooking flavorful food on a strict deadline, as well as about the Ramadan fast. Her advice about breaking the fast at iftar after a long day?

"Don't overdo it. Traditionally we have a large spread during Ramadan to break the fast," the 26-year-old Seattle native told HuffPost Religion over the phone. "But stick to a few areas -- a carb, a protein, fiber.”

Nour Zibdeh, a registered dietitian based in Virginia, abides by the same principles.

While fasting has numerous health benefits -- such as giving the digestive tract time to rest and detox and allowing the body to tap into the energy stored up inside fat tissues -- Zibdeh says some people experience the opposite.

“People think that you lose weight during fasting, but some people tend to overeat high-calorie foods and that compensates for the fasting hours,” Zibdeh told HuffPost. “And some people do actually gain weight.”

Saab’s biggest tip is to “keep it simple” by making sure each meal has complex, non-refined carbs, a healthy protein and plenty of color.

“Do not go overboard, try and not waste food," Saab advised. "And share with your neighbors, as that is the true essence of the month."

Saab and Zibdeh shared a number of easy recipes for both suhoor and iftar, including some for those who are in a rush and others for people who have a little bit more time to spend at the stove. Take a look at the recipes below.

Mix a cup of plain Greek or regular yogurt with one tablespoon chia seeds, two tablespoons pumpkin seeds and three chopped dates.

Chop up a hard-boiled egg and combine with half an avocado and two tablespoons of salsa. Eat with a fork and munch on blueberries on the side.

"Use Chobani Greek Yogurt for extra protein and top with chia seeds for added fiber to help keep you feeling full."

"Quinoa breakfast bowls are easy to assemble in your morning stupor. Prepare the potassium, calcium and fiber-packed quinoa in large batches at the beginning of the week. Then add your toppings!"

An easy way to get a cup of vegetables and healthy oils like omega-3 or coconut oil. Add a scoop of protein to balance the smoothie and make you stay full longer.

This is a simple yet complete meal. Watermelons and peppers have a high water content, which helps improve hydration.

"A bland canvas packed with fiber and protein! Add your favorite fruits, nuts and granolas for the perfect, quick Suhoor! I like to zap it in the microwave for 30 seconds so it is nice and warm when I dig in."

Yogurt is filling, thanks to its protein content. Prepare and store the fruit in a container in advance to speed up the process at Suhoor.

Dates are a common Ramadan fruit, one that was eaten by the Prophet Muhammad. Balance the natural sugars in dates with almonds and chia seeds in this date bars recipe. The additional proteins and fats will make you feel full longer. The cocoa in this recipe is also bound to make you happy.

"Toast up some bread, add some avocado and eggs and enjoy! If you want to impress your family at 3 a.m. and make them think they woke up in one of Gordon Ramsay’s restaurants, add some chive blossoms."

"You can’t go wrong with eggs . If poaching is too intimidating, simply scramble. Serve with your favorite fruit or whole wheat tortilla."

Make this once and eat it over a few days. It’s easy to reheat in the microwave so you don’t spend time cooking in the middle of the night. Eggs and cheese are an excellent source of protein and it’s an easy way to add veggies to your day. Also try it with spinach, bell peppers, tomatoes or olives.

Why not eat a salad for suhoor? Hard-boil a few eggs, depending on how many people are in your household. You can eat this over few days -- just store the boiled eggs in the fridge in their shells.

Make this mix early in the week and eat it over a few nights. Muesli is a good source of fiber and can be low in sugar if you choose your ingredients correctly. Try this for a cold suhoor during Ramadan. Commercial muesli is expensive, but you can make your own using this recipe.


24 Easy Ramadan Recipes That Will Keep You Energized All Month Long

As part of the holy month of Ramadan, which started last week, millions of Muslims around the world will abstain from food and water between dawn and dusk.

Muslims keeping the fast typically wake up before dawn and eat a "suhoor" meal, which means they need to make something quickly that will also keep them nourished throughout the day. The "iftar," or evening meal, comes with its own challenges -- families and friends usually gather for big celebratory dinners, which can often be filled with tempting fried foods.

Not everyone knows how to fast well, admits Amanda Saab, a contestant on Fox’s cooking competition “Masterchef.”

The first Muslim-American to compete on the show, Saab knows a thing or two about the challenge of cooking flavorful food on a strict deadline, as well as about the Ramadan fast. Her advice about breaking the fast at iftar after a long day?

"Don't overdo it. Traditionally we have a large spread during Ramadan to break the fast," the 26-year-old Seattle native told HuffPost Religion over the phone. "But stick to a few areas -- a carb, a protein, fiber.”

Nour Zibdeh, a registered dietitian based in Virginia, abides by the same principles.

While fasting has numerous health benefits -- such as giving the digestive tract time to rest and detox and allowing the body to tap into the energy stored up inside fat tissues -- Zibdeh says some people experience the opposite.

“People think that you lose weight during fasting, but some people tend to overeat high-calorie foods and that compensates for the fasting hours,” Zibdeh told HuffPost. “And some people do actually gain weight.”

Saab’s biggest tip is to “keep it simple” by making sure each meal has complex, non-refined carbs, a healthy protein and plenty of color.

“Do not go overboard, try and not waste food," Saab advised. "And share with your neighbors, as that is the true essence of the month."

Saab and Zibdeh shared a number of easy recipes for both suhoor and iftar, including some for those who are in a rush and others for people who have a little bit more time to spend at the stove. Take a look at the recipes below.

Mix a cup of plain Greek or regular yogurt with one tablespoon chia seeds, two tablespoons pumpkin seeds and three chopped dates.

Chop up a hard-boiled egg and combine with half an avocado and two tablespoons of salsa. Eat with a fork and munch on blueberries on the side.

"Use Chobani Greek Yogurt for extra protein and top with chia seeds for added fiber to help keep you feeling full."

"Quinoa breakfast bowls are easy to assemble in your morning stupor. Prepare the potassium, calcium and fiber-packed quinoa in large batches at the beginning of the week. Then add your toppings!"

An easy way to get a cup of vegetables and healthy oils like omega-3 or coconut oil. Add a scoop of protein to balance the smoothie and make you stay full longer.

This is a simple yet complete meal. Watermelons and peppers have a high water content, which helps improve hydration.

"A bland canvas packed with fiber and protein! Add your favorite fruits, nuts and granolas for the perfect, quick Suhoor! I like to zap it in the microwave for 30 seconds so it is nice and warm when I dig in."

Yogurt is filling, thanks to its protein content. Prepare and store the fruit in a container in advance to speed up the process at Suhoor.

Dates are a common Ramadan fruit, one that was eaten by the Prophet Muhammad. Balance the natural sugars in dates with almonds and chia seeds in this date bars recipe. The additional proteins and fats will make you feel full longer. The cocoa in this recipe is also bound to make you happy.

"Toast up some bread, add some avocado and eggs and enjoy! If you want to impress your family at 3 a.m. and make them think they woke up in one of Gordon Ramsay’s restaurants, add some chive blossoms."

"You can’t go wrong with eggs . If poaching is too intimidating, simply scramble. Serve with your favorite fruit or whole wheat tortilla."

Make this once and eat it over a few days. It’s easy to reheat in the microwave so you don’t spend time cooking in the middle of the night. Eggs and cheese are an excellent source of protein and it’s an easy way to add veggies to your day. Also try it with spinach, bell peppers, tomatoes or olives.

Why not eat a salad for suhoor? Hard-boil a few eggs, depending on how many people are in your household. You can eat this over few days -- just store the boiled eggs in the fridge in their shells.

Make this mix early in the week and eat it over a few nights. Muesli is a good source of fiber and can be low in sugar if you choose your ingredients correctly. Try this for a cold suhoor during Ramadan. Commercial muesli is expensive, but you can make your own using this recipe.


24 Easy Ramadan Recipes That Will Keep You Energized All Month Long

As part of the holy month of Ramadan, which started last week, millions of Muslims around the world will abstain from food and water between dawn and dusk.

Muslims keeping the fast typically wake up before dawn and eat a "suhoor" meal, which means they need to make something quickly that will also keep them nourished throughout the day. The "iftar," or evening meal, comes with its own challenges -- families and friends usually gather for big celebratory dinners, which can often be filled with tempting fried foods.

Not everyone knows how to fast well, admits Amanda Saab, a contestant on Fox’s cooking competition “Masterchef.”

The first Muslim-American to compete on the show, Saab knows a thing or two about the challenge of cooking flavorful food on a strict deadline, as well as about the Ramadan fast. Her advice about breaking the fast at iftar after a long day?

"Don't overdo it. Traditionally we have a large spread during Ramadan to break the fast," the 26-year-old Seattle native told HuffPost Religion over the phone. "But stick to a few areas -- a carb, a protein, fiber.”

Nour Zibdeh, a registered dietitian based in Virginia, abides by the same principles.

While fasting has numerous health benefits -- such as giving the digestive tract time to rest and detox and allowing the body to tap into the energy stored up inside fat tissues -- Zibdeh says some people experience the opposite.

“People think that you lose weight during fasting, but some people tend to overeat high-calorie foods and that compensates for the fasting hours,” Zibdeh told HuffPost. “And some people do actually gain weight.”

Saab’s biggest tip is to “keep it simple” by making sure each meal has complex, non-refined carbs, a healthy protein and plenty of color.

“Do not go overboard, try and not waste food," Saab advised. "And share with your neighbors, as that is the true essence of the month."

Saab and Zibdeh shared a number of easy recipes for both suhoor and iftar, including some for those who are in a rush and others for people who have a little bit more time to spend at the stove. Take a look at the recipes below.

Mix a cup of plain Greek or regular yogurt with one tablespoon chia seeds, two tablespoons pumpkin seeds and three chopped dates.

Chop up a hard-boiled egg and combine with half an avocado and two tablespoons of salsa. Eat with a fork and munch on blueberries on the side.

"Use Chobani Greek Yogurt for extra protein and top with chia seeds for added fiber to help keep you feeling full."

"Quinoa breakfast bowls are easy to assemble in your morning stupor. Prepare the potassium, calcium and fiber-packed quinoa in large batches at the beginning of the week. Then add your toppings!"

An easy way to get a cup of vegetables and healthy oils like omega-3 or coconut oil. Add a scoop of protein to balance the smoothie and make you stay full longer.

This is a simple yet complete meal. Watermelons and peppers have a high water content, which helps improve hydration.

"A bland canvas packed with fiber and protein! Add your favorite fruits, nuts and granolas for the perfect, quick Suhoor! I like to zap it in the microwave for 30 seconds so it is nice and warm when I dig in."

Yogurt is filling, thanks to its protein content. Prepare and store the fruit in a container in advance to speed up the process at Suhoor.

Dates are a common Ramadan fruit, one that was eaten by the Prophet Muhammad. Balance the natural sugars in dates with almonds and chia seeds in this date bars recipe. The additional proteins and fats will make you feel full longer. The cocoa in this recipe is also bound to make you happy.

"Toast up some bread, add some avocado and eggs and enjoy! If you want to impress your family at 3 a.m. and make them think they woke up in one of Gordon Ramsay’s restaurants, add some chive blossoms."

"You can’t go wrong with eggs . If poaching is too intimidating, simply scramble. Serve with your favorite fruit or whole wheat tortilla."

Make this once and eat it over a few days. It’s easy to reheat in the microwave so you don’t spend time cooking in the middle of the night. Eggs and cheese are an excellent source of protein and it’s an easy way to add veggies to your day. Also try it with spinach, bell peppers, tomatoes or olives.

Why not eat a salad for suhoor? Hard-boil a few eggs, depending on how many people are in your household. You can eat this over few days -- just store the boiled eggs in the fridge in their shells.

Make this mix early in the week and eat it over a few nights. Muesli is a good source of fiber and can be low in sugar if you choose your ingredients correctly. Try this for a cold suhoor during Ramadan. Commercial muesli is expensive, but you can make your own using this recipe.


24 Easy Ramadan Recipes That Will Keep You Energized All Month Long

As part of the holy month of Ramadan, which started last week, millions of Muslims around the world will abstain from food and water between dawn and dusk.

Muslims keeping the fast typically wake up before dawn and eat a "suhoor" meal, which means they need to make something quickly that will also keep them nourished throughout the day. The "iftar," or evening meal, comes with its own challenges -- families and friends usually gather for big celebratory dinners, which can often be filled with tempting fried foods.

Not everyone knows how to fast well, admits Amanda Saab, a contestant on Fox’s cooking competition “Masterchef.”

The first Muslim-American to compete on the show, Saab knows a thing or two about the challenge of cooking flavorful food on a strict deadline, as well as about the Ramadan fast. Her advice about breaking the fast at iftar after a long day?

"Don't overdo it. Traditionally we have a large spread during Ramadan to break the fast," the 26-year-old Seattle native told HuffPost Religion over the phone. "But stick to a few areas -- a carb, a protein, fiber.”

Nour Zibdeh, a registered dietitian based in Virginia, abides by the same principles.

While fasting has numerous health benefits -- such as giving the digestive tract time to rest and detox and allowing the body to tap into the energy stored up inside fat tissues -- Zibdeh says some people experience the opposite.

“People think that you lose weight during fasting, but some people tend to overeat high-calorie foods and that compensates for the fasting hours,” Zibdeh told HuffPost. “And some people do actually gain weight.”

Saab’s biggest tip is to “keep it simple” by making sure each meal has complex, non-refined carbs, a healthy protein and plenty of color.

“Do not go overboard, try and not waste food," Saab advised. "And share with your neighbors, as that is the true essence of the month."

Saab and Zibdeh shared a number of easy recipes for both suhoor and iftar, including some for those who are in a rush and others for people who have a little bit more time to spend at the stove. Take a look at the recipes below.

Mix a cup of plain Greek or regular yogurt with one tablespoon chia seeds, two tablespoons pumpkin seeds and three chopped dates.

Chop up a hard-boiled egg and combine with half an avocado and two tablespoons of salsa. Eat with a fork and munch on blueberries on the side.

"Use Chobani Greek Yogurt for extra protein and top with chia seeds for added fiber to help keep you feeling full."

"Quinoa breakfast bowls are easy to assemble in your morning stupor. Prepare the potassium, calcium and fiber-packed quinoa in large batches at the beginning of the week. Then add your toppings!"

An easy way to get a cup of vegetables and healthy oils like omega-3 or coconut oil. Add a scoop of protein to balance the smoothie and make you stay full longer.

This is a simple yet complete meal. Watermelons and peppers have a high water content, which helps improve hydration.

"A bland canvas packed with fiber and protein! Add your favorite fruits, nuts and granolas for the perfect, quick Suhoor! I like to zap it in the microwave for 30 seconds so it is nice and warm when I dig in."

Yogurt is filling, thanks to its protein content. Prepare and store the fruit in a container in advance to speed up the process at Suhoor.

Dates are a common Ramadan fruit, one that was eaten by the Prophet Muhammad. Balance the natural sugars in dates with almonds and chia seeds in this date bars recipe. The additional proteins and fats will make you feel full longer. The cocoa in this recipe is also bound to make you happy.

"Toast up some bread, add some avocado and eggs and enjoy! If you want to impress your family at 3 a.m. and make them think they woke up in one of Gordon Ramsay’s restaurants, add some chive blossoms."

"You can’t go wrong with eggs . If poaching is too intimidating, simply scramble. Serve with your favorite fruit or whole wheat tortilla."

Make this once and eat it over a few days. It’s easy to reheat in the microwave so you don’t spend time cooking in the middle of the night. Eggs and cheese are an excellent source of protein and it’s an easy way to add veggies to your day. Also try it with spinach, bell peppers, tomatoes or olives.

Why not eat a salad for suhoor? Hard-boil a few eggs, depending on how many people are in your household. You can eat this over few days -- just store the boiled eggs in the fridge in their shells.

Make this mix early in the week and eat it over a few nights. Muesli is a good source of fiber and can be low in sugar if you choose your ingredients correctly. Try this for a cold suhoor during Ramadan. Commercial muesli is expensive, but you can make your own using this recipe.


Watch the video: Easy 10 Breakfast Recipes (January 2022).