Traditional recipes

The Passport Cocktail

The Passport Cocktail

This cocktail is the perfect for the transition between summer and fall

This sweet, slightly bitter cocktail is perfectly balanced and delicately fruity.

“Since we're located in a historically Italian American neighborhood using Italian amari was a pretty on the nose inspiration. Those cold season spices presented in a refreshing way,” says Sofia Present of August Laura cocktail bar.

This recipe is courtesy of Sofia Present of August Laura cocktail bar.

Ingredients

  • 1 Ounce Campari
  • 1 Ounce white vermouth
  • 1 Ounce grapefruit juice
  • 1/2 Ounce lime juice
  • 1/2 Ounce simple syrup
  • 2 dashes rhubarb bitters
  • Soda, to top
  • Orange wedge, to garnish
  • Cucumber slice, to garnish

No Passport Required: Cocktails from Around the World

Traveling is put on hold for most of us this summer, but that doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy unique flavors found overseas. Shake, stir or mix up one of these six cocktails inspired from your favorite places abroad. If you don’t consider yourself much of a mixologist, check out our recommendations for four pieces of equipment to help get you started.

Italy: The Negroni

Born out of Count Camillo Negroni’s desire for a stronger beverage, he replaced the soda water in his favorite cocktail with gin. With sweet vermouth and Campari rounding out the drink, it’s no wonder the Negroni soared to popularity.

France: The Kir Royale

The Kir Royale. French socialites started mixing this simple cocktail, made by adding a little crème de cassis and lemon twist to a glass of champagne, for their luxurious gatherings. It’s typically reserved for special occasions.

Peru: The Pisco Sour

Pisco is Peruvian liquor made from grape seed and is often described as a cross between brandy and tequila. The pisco sour is made by mixing the pisco with sugar, lime and egg whites. A splash of bitters finishes the drink.

Brazil: The Caipirinha

Brazil’s signature drink is one of my favorites. It calls for Cachaça, a sugar cane liquor that is similar to rum. The liquor is shaken with pressed sugar and fresh lime.

Great Britain: The Pimm’s Cup

Originating in a London oyster bar in the 1840s to combat acid indigestion, this cocktail combines Pimm’s no. 1 liqueur, sliced orange, lemon, apple, cucumber, mint and ginger ale to cure what ails you.

Mexico: Paloma

Everybody is familiar with the margarita, but not everybody has heard of the paloma. More popular to the locals, the paloma combines silver tequila, fresh lime, a pinch of salt and pink grapefruit soda.


No Passport Required: Cocktails from Around the World

Traveling is put on hold for most of us this summer, but that doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy unique flavors found overseas. Shake, stir or mix up one of these six cocktails inspired from your favorite places abroad. If you don’t consider yourself much of a mixologist, check out our recommendations for four pieces of equipment to help get you started.

Italy: The Negroni

Born out of Count Camillo Negroni’s desire for a stronger beverage, he replaced the soda water in his favorite cocktail with gin. With sweet vermouth and Campari rounding out the drink, it’s no wonder the Negroni soared to popularity.

France: The Kir Royale

The Kir Royale. French socialites started mixing this simple cocktail, made by adding a little crème de cassis and lemon twist to a glass of champagne, for their luxurious gatherings. It’s typically reserved for special occasions.

Peru: The Pisco Sour

Pisco is Peruvian liquor made from grape seed and is often described as a cross between brandy and tequila. The pisco sour is made by mixing the pisco with sugar, lime and egg whites. A splash of bitters finishes the drink.

Brazil: The Caipirinha

Brazil’s signature drink is one of my favorites. It calls for Cachaça, a sugar cane liquor that is similar to rum. The liquor is shaken with pressed sugar and fresh lime.

Great Britain: The Pimm’s Cup

Originating in a London oyster bar in the 1840s to combat acid indigestion, this cocktail combines Pimm’s no. 1 liqueur, sliced orange, lemon, apple, cucumber, mint and ginger ale to cure what ails you.

Mexico: Paloma

Everybody is familiar with the margarita, but not everybody has heard of the paloma. More popular to the locals, the paloma combines silver tequila, fresh lime, a pinch of salt and pink grapefruit soda.


No Passport Required: Cocktails from Around the World

Traveling is put on hold for most of us this summer, but that doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy unique flavors found overseas. Shake, stir or mix up one of these six cocktails inspired from your favorite places abroad. If you don’t consider yourself much of a mixologist, check out our recommendations for four pieces of equipment to help get you started.

Italy: The Negroni

Born out of Count Camillo Negroni’s desire for a stronger beverage, he replaced the soda water in his favorite cocktail with gin. With sweet vermouth and Campari rounding out the drink, it’s no wonder the Negroni soared to popularity.

France: The Kir Royale

The Kir Royale. French socialites started mixing this simple cocktail, made by adding a little crème de cassis and lemon twist to a glass of champagne, for their luxurious gatherings. It’s typically reserved for special occasions.

Peru: The Pisco Sour

Pisco is Peruvian liquor made from grape seed and is often described as a cross between brandy and tequila. The pisco sour is made by mixing the pisco with sugar, lime and egg whites. A splash of bitters finishes the drink.

Brazil: The Caipirinha

Brazil’s signature drink is one of my favorites. It calls for Cachaça, a sugar cane liquor that is similar to rum. The liquor is shaken with pressed sugar and fresh lime.

Great Britain: The Pimm’s Cup

Originating in a London oyster bar in the 1840s to combat acid indigestion, this cocktail combines Pimm’s no. 1 liqueur, sliced orange, lemon, apple, cucumber, mint and ginger ale to cure what ails you.

Mexico: Paloma

Everybody is familiar with the margarita, but not everybody has heard of the paloma. More popular to the locals, the paloma combines silver tequila, fresh lime, a pinch of salt and pink grapefruit soda.


No Passport Required: Cocktails from Around the World

Traveling is put on hold for most of us this summer, but that doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy unique flavors found overseas. Shake, stir or mix up one of these six cocktails inspired from your favorite places abroad. If you don’t consider yourself much of a mixologist, check out our recommendations for four pieces of equipment to help get you started.

Italy: The Negroni

Born out of Count Camillo Negroni’s desire for a stronger beverage, he replaced the soda water in his favorite cocktail with gin. With sweet vermouth and Campari rounding out the drink, it’s no wonder the Negroni soared to popularity.

France: The Kir Royale

The Kir Royale. French socialites started mixing this simple cocktail, made by adding a little crème de cassis and lemon twist to a glass of champagne, for their luxurious gatherings. It’s typically reserved for special occasions.

Peru: The Pisco Sour

Pisco is Peruvian liquor made from grape seed and is often described as a cross between brandy and tequila. The pisco sour is made by mixing the pisco with sugar, lime and egg whites. A splash of bitters finishes the drink.

Brazil: The Caipirinha

Brazil’s signature drink is one of my favorites. It calls for Cachaça, a sugar cane liquor that is similar to rum. The liquor is shaken with pressed sugar and fresh lime.

Great Britain: The Pimm’s Cup

Originating in a London oyster bar in the 1840s to combat acid indigestion, this cocktail combines Pimm’s no. 1 liqueur, sliced orange, lemon, apple, cucumber, mint and ginger ale to cure what ails you.

Mexico: Paloma

Everybody is familiar with the margarita, but not everybody has heard of the paloma. More popular to the locals, the paloma combines silver tequila, fresh lime, a pinch of salt and pink grapefruit soda.


No Passport Required: Cocktails from Around the World

Traveling is put on hold for most of us this summer, but that doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy unique flavors found overseas. Shake, stir or mix up one of these six cocktails inspired from your favorite places abroad. If you don’t consider yourself much of a mixologist, check out our recommendations for four pieces of equipment to help get you started.

Italy: The Negroni

Born out of Count Camillo Negroni’s desire for a stronger beverage, he replaced the soda water in his favorite cocktail with gin. With sweet vermouth and Campari rounding out the drink, it’s no wonder the Negroni soared to popularity.

France: The Kir Royale

The Kir Royale. French socialites started mixing this simple cocktail, made by adding a little crème de cassis and lemon twist to a glass of champagne, for their luxurious gatherings. It’s typically reserved for special occasions.

Peru: The Pisco Sour

Pisco is Peruvian liquor made from grape seed and is often described as a cross between brandy and tequila. The pisco sour is made by mixing the pisco with sugar, lime and egg whites. A splash of bitters finishes the drink.

Brazil: The Caipirinha

Brazil’s signature drink is one of my favorites. It calls for Cachaça, a sugar cane liquor that is similar to rum. The liquor is shaken with pressed sugar and fresh lime.

Great Britain: The Pimm’s Cup

Originating in a London oyster bar in the 1840s to combat acid indigestion, this cocktail combines Pimm’s no. 1 liqueur, sliced orange, lemon, apple, cucumber, mint and ginger ale to cure what ails you.

Mexico: Paloma

Everybody is familiar with the margarita, but not everybody has heard of the paloma. More popular to the locals, the paloma combines silver tequila, fresh lime, a pinch of salt and pink grapefruit soda.


No Passport Required: Cocktails from Around the World

Traveling is put on hold for most of us this summer, but that doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy unique flavors found overseas. Shake, stir or mix up one of these six cocktails inspired from your favorite places abroad. If you don’t consider yourself much of a mixologist, check out our recommendations for four pieces of equipment to help get you started.

Italy: The Negroni

Born out of Count Camillo Negroni’s desire for a stronger beverage, he replaced the soda water in his favorite cocktail with gin. With sweet vermouth and Campari rounding out the drink, it’s no wonder the Negroni soared to popularity.

France: The Kir Royale

The Kir Royale. French socialites started mixing this simple cocktail, made by adding a little crème de cassis and lemon twist to a glass of champagne, for their luxurious gatherings. It’s typically reserved for special occasions.

Peru: The Pisco Sour

Pisco is Peruvian liquor made from grape seed and is often described as a cross between brandy and tequila. The pisco sour is made by mixing the pisco with sugar, lime and egg whites. A splash of bitters finishes the drink.

Brazil: The Caipirinha

Brazil’s signature drink is one of my favorites. It calls for Cachaça, a sugar cane liquor that is similar to rum. The liquor is shaken with pressed sugar and fresh lime.

Great Britain: The Pimm’s Cup

Originating in a London oyster bar in the 1840s to combat acid indigestion, this cocktail combines Pimm’s no. 1 liqueur, sliced orange, lemon, apple, cucumber, mint and ginger ale to cure what ails you.

Mexico: Paloma

Everybody is familiar with the margarita, but not everybody has heard of the paloma. More popular to the locals, the paloma combines silver tequila, fresh lime, a pinch of salt and pink grapefruit soda.


No Passport Required: Cocktails from Around the World

Traveling is put on hold for most of us this summer, but that doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy unique flavors found overseas. Shake, stir or mix up one of these six cocktails inspired from your favorite places abroad. If you don’t consider yourself much of a mixologist, check out our recommendations for four pieces of equipment to help get you started.

Italy: The Negroni

Born out of Count Camillo Negroni’s desire for a stronger beverage, he replaced the soda water in his favorite cocktail with gin. With sweet vermouth and Campari rounding out the drink, it’s no wonder the Negroni soared to popularity.

France: The Kir Royale

The Kir Royale. French socialites started mixing this simple cocktail, made by adding a little crème de cassis and lemon twist to a glass of champagne, for their luxurious gatherings. It’s typically reserved for special occasions.

Peru: The Pisco Sour

Pisco is Peruvian liquor made from grape seed and is often described as a cross between brandy and tequila. The pisco sour is made by mixing the pisco with sugar, lime and egg whites. A splash of bitters finishes the drink.

Brazil: The Caipirinha

Brazil’s signature drink is one of my favorites. It calls for Cachaça, a sugar cane liquor that is similar to rum. The liquor is shaken with pressed sugar and fresh lime.

Great Britain: The Pimm’s Cup

Originating in a London oyster bar in the 1840s to combat acid indigestion, this cocktail combines Pimm’s no. 1 liqueur, sliced orange, lemon, apple, cucumber, mint and ginger ale to cure what ails you.

Mexico: Paloma

Everybody is familiar with the margarita, but not everybody has heard of the paloma. More popular to the locals, the paloma combines silver tequila, fresh lime, a pinch of salt and pink grapefruit soda.


No Passport Required: Cocktails from Around the World

Traveling is put on hold for most of us this summer, but that doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy unique flavors found overseas. Shake, stir or mix up one of these six cocktails inspired from your favorite places abroad. If you don’t consider yourself much of a mixologist, check out our recommendations for four pieces of equipment to help get you started.

Italy: The Negroni

Born out of Count Camillo Negroni’s desire for a stronger beverage, he replaced the soda water in his favorite cocktail with gin. With sweet vermouth and Campari rounding out the drink, it’s no wonder the Negroni soared to popularity.

France: The Kir Royale

The Kir Royale. French socialites started mixing this simple cocktail, made by adding a little crème de cassis and lemon twist to a glass of champagne, for their luxurious gatherings. It’s typically reserved for special occasions.

Peru: The Pisco Sour

Pisco is Peruvian liquor made from grape seed and is often described as a cross between brandy and tequila. The pisco sour is made by mixing the pisco with sugar, lime and egg whites. A splash of bitters finishes the drink.

Brazil: The Caipirinha

Brazil’s signature drink is one of my favorites. It calls for Cachaça, a sugar cane liquor that is similar to rum. The liquor is shaken with pressed sugar and fresh lime.

Great Britain: The Pimm’s Cup

Originating in a London oyster bar in the 1840s to combat acid indigestion, this cocktail combines Pimm’s no. 1 liqueur, sliced orange, lemon, apple, cucumber, mint and ginger ale to cure what ails you.

Mexico: Paloma

Everybody is familiar with the margarita, but not everybody has heard of the paloma. More popular to the locals, the paloma combines silver tequila, fresh lime, a pinch of salt and pink grapefruit soda.


No Passport Required: Cocktails from Around the World

Traveling is put on hold for most of us this summer, but that doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy unique flavors found overseas. Shake, stir or mix up one of these six cocktails inspired from your favorite places abroad. If you don’t consider yourself much of a mixologist, check out our recommendations for four pieces of equipment to help get you started.

Italy: The Negroni

Born out of Count Camillo Negroni’s desire for a stronger beverage, he replaced the soda water in his favorite cocktail with gin. With sweet vermouth and Campari rounding out the drink, it’s no wonder the Negroni soared to popularity.

France: The Kir Royale

The Kir Royale. French socialites started mixing this simple cocktail, made by adding a little crème de cassis and lemon twist to a glass of champagne, for their luxurious gatherings. It’s typically reserved for special occasions.

Peru: The Pisco Sour

Pisco is Peruvian liquor made from grape seed and is often described as a cross between brandy and tequila. The pisco sour is made by mixing the pisco with sugar, lime and egg whites. A splash of bitters finishes the drink.

Brazil: The Caipirinha

Brazil’s signature drink is one of my favorites. It calls for Cachaça, a sugar cane liquor that is similar to rum. The liquor is shaken with pressed sugar and fresh lime.

Great Britain: The Pimm’s Cup

Originating in a London oyster bar in the 1840s to combat acid indigestion, this cocktail combines Pimm’s no. 1 liqueur, sliced orange, lemon, apple, cucumber, mint and ginger ale to cure what ails you.

Mexico: Paloma

Everybody is familiar with the margarita, but not everybody has heard of the paloma. More popular to the locals, the paloma combines silver tequila, fresh lime, a pinch of salt and pink grapefruit soda.


No Passport Required: Cocktails from Around the World

Traveling is put on hold for most of us this summer, but that doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy unique flavors found overseas. Shake, stir or mix up one of these six cocktails inspired from your favorite places abroad. If you don’t consider yourself much of a mixologist, check out our recommendations for four pieces of equipment to help get you started.

Italy: The Negroni

Born out of Count Camillo Negroni’s desire for a stronger beverage, he replaced the soda water in his favorite cocktail with gin. With sweet vermouth and Campari rounding out the drink, it’s no wonder the Negroni soared to popularity.

France: The Kir Royale

The Kir Royale. French socialites started mixing this simple cocktail, made by adding a little crème de cassis and lemon twist to a glass of champagne, for their luxurious gatherings. It’s typically reserved for special occasions.

Peru: The Pisco Sour

Pisco is Peruvian liquor made from grape seed and is often described as a cross between brandy and tequila. The pisco sour is made by mixing the pisco with sugar, lime and egg whites. A splash of bitters finishes the drink.

Brazil: The Caipirinha

Brazil’s signature drink is one of my favorites. It calls for Cachaça, a sugar cane liquor that is similar to rum. The liquor is shaken with pressed sugar and fresh lime.

Great Britain: The Pimm’s Cup

Originating in a London oyster bar in the 1840s to combat acid indigestion, this cocktail combines Pimm’s no. 1 liqueur, sliced orange, lemon, apple, cucumber, mint and ginger ale to cure what ails you.

Mexico: Paloma

Everybody is familiar with the margarita, but not everybody has heard of the paloma. More popular to the locals, the paloma combines silver tequila, fresh lime, a pinch of salt and pink grapefruit soda.


Watch the video: Passport Please (January 2022).