Traditional recipes

Heinz Potato and Leek Bake recipe

Heinz Potato and Leek Bake recipe

  • Recipes
  • Ingredients
  • Vegetable
  • Root vegetables
  • Potato
  • Potato side dishes
  • Baked potato

A deliciously easy dish with Heinz Potato and Leek soup as its secret ingredient that can be a complete meal for supper, or you can add ham for a more substantial meal in itself, or use as a side dish for grilled chicken or leftover roast meat.


Cornwall, England, UK

9 people made this

IngredientsServes: 4

  • 6 medium large potatoes, washed and sliced thinly
  • 3 leeks, sliced
  • 1 (400g) tin Heinz Potato and Leek soup
  • 3 slices granary bread whizzed into crumbs
  • 50g cheddar cheese, grated
  • 1 tbsp oil
  • 1 tsp butter for greasing dish

MethodPrep:10min ›Cook:1hr ›Ready in:1hr10min

  1. Parboil the sliced potatoes
  2. Lightly sautee the sliced leeks in the oil
  3. Grease an ovenproof dish with the butter. Put a layer of potatoes on the bottom. Cover with the sauteed leeks. Season with pepper. Layer the remaining potatoes on top.
  4. Pour the Heinz Potato and Leek soup into a jug and add water to make up to 0.5 litre and stir to combine. Pour evenly over the potatoes.
  5. Mix together breadcrumbs and cheese and sprinkle evenly over the dish.
  6. Bake in a moderate oven (180 degrees) for about one hour until the potatoes are tender and the top is crisp. If the top is browning too much, place a sheet of baking parchment or tin foil loosely on top.

Serving suggestion

Serve on its own with a green vegetable for a meal in itself, or with freshly prepared or leftover Sunday roast meat.

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  • 6 large potatoes
  • 2 large leeks
  • mature cheddar
  • 2 tablespoons flour
  • 300 millilitres milk
  • butter
  • 1 pinch of salt
  • 1 pinch of pepper
  • herbs
  • 6 large potatoes
  • 2 large leeks
  • mature cheddar
  • 2 tablespoons flour
  • 11 fluid ounces milk
  • butter
  • 1 pinch of salt
  • 1 pinch of pepper
  • herbs

Tomato-glazed meatloaves with brown butter mashed potatoes

I am a sucker for a good meatball. Something happens when you mix otherwise one-dimensional ground meats up with fresh breadcrumbs, herbs, seasonings and make a great sauce to go with it and that is that I will swat your fork away to get at them first. I always believed I held no such adoration for meatloaf until I mentioned this one day — here, on my invisible soapbox — and someone in the comments asked gently, as if they understood they were speaking to a very easily confused individual, if I knew that meatloaf is basically one giant meatball?


And well, no, I had not. Armed with this eye-opening revelation, I set out to address what I found so off-putting about meatloaf. First, I mean obviously, the word and concept of a loaf of meat. I don’t care how many freshly snipped herbs on top and how heavily you lay on the Clarendon filter, a slab of ground meat is always going to be a thing we look past to get to the flavor we love within. And so I decided to make them more like meatballs — round, a bit more tender, and possibly, if you really squint your eyes, a little cute. Okay, yes, I know, that’s a stretch.



Next, I addressed the ketchup meatloaf is often coated with. Let me be absolutely clear: I love ketchup. I have no foodie shame about the delight of a Heinz bottle, in fact, I share a Jeffrey Steingarten level of awe over “our proudest, perhaps our only, homegrown sauce achievement,” and this was about the hardest I have laughed at a food article in the last six months because it’s completely true. But I find it a little thin on meatloaf and so I decided to make my own tart-sweet tomato-ish sauce for the top of my baby meatloaves with tomato paste, Dijon, cider vinegar and a few other things simmered for two minutes until smooth and guys, it’s ketchup. Slightly more tart and thick but it’s basically no more a tomato sauce than these are classic meatballs. Take this information as you wish.

Because I think we can all agree that vegetables within meatloaf are delicious and essential but chunks of carrots and peas poking out all over are… unsettling, I coarsely grind my vegetables before sauteeing them and adding them to the meatloaf mixture.



Finally, because life it too short to eat inferior mashed potatoes, I make mine with a shameless amount of brown butter and then buttermilk for tang and it’s been hard to make them any other way since.

I published this recipe the first time in The Smitten Kitchen Cookbook, but as we have shivered through snowstorms, wind and general February-ness lately, a few requests have come in for a meatloaf recipe and as this is the very best I have ever made, I hope you’ll agree.

Previously

Tomato-Glazed Meatloaves with Brown Butter Mashed Potatoes

  • Servings: 6 substantially, 12 more humbly with a vegetable side
  • Time: 1 hour cooking
  • Source:The Smitten Kitchen Cookbook
Glaze
Meatloaves
Potatoes

Prepare the meatloaves: Heat your oven to 350 degrees F. Lightly coat 2 9吉-inch baking dishes with nonstick spray or oil. Tear the bread into chunks and then blend it, in a food processor, into breadcrumbs. Place the breadcrumbs in a large bowl. You should have about 1 cup.

Add the onion, garlic, celery, and carrot to the food processor, and pulse it until they are finely chopped. Heat a large skillet over medium heat. Once the skillet is hot, coat the bottom with olive oil, and heat the oil for a minute add the finely chopped vegetables. Season with salt and pepper, and cook, stirring frequently, until they begin to brown, about 10 minutes.

Add the vegetables to the large bowl with breadcrumbs, then add the remaining ingredients. Stir the ingredients together with a fork or your hands until evenly blended.

Pause for a moment to start mashed potatoes: Place the potatoes in a medium pot, and cover with a couple inches of cold water. Bring to a boil over high heat, and once it’s boiling, reduce the heat to a simmer. Cook for about 20 minutes once the simmering begins the potatoes are ready when a paring knife or fork can be inserted into the center with little resistance. Drain potatoes, then wipe the pot dry.

Resume your meatloaves while the potatoes boil: Form the meatloaf mixture into twelve 3-inch meatballs each will weigh about 4 ounces. Arrange 6 in each prepared baking pan, evenly. Drizzle or brush each meatball with a teaspoon or so of the tomato glaze you made earlier, and bake until cooked through, about 20 to 25 minutes (an instant-read thermometer inserted into the center of a cooked meatball will register 160 to 165F).

Finish mashed potatoes: As soon as you can hold them (I use potholders), peel your potatoes. The skins should come right off with a paring knife. Run the potatoes through a potato ricer or mash them with a masher until smooth. In your empty potato pot, melt butter over medium heat and continue cooking once it has melted, stirring almost constantly, until brown bits form around edge and bottom and it smells nutty. Pour the hot butter and any browned bits over the potatoes. Add buttermilk to pot and warm it gently (so it doesn’t cool down your potatoes when you add it). Pour this over the potatoes too. Add salt and pepper and stir to combine.

To serve: Place a dollop of potatoes in the bottom of a plate or shallow bowl. Top with a meatloaf. Garnish with extra chopped parsley, if desired.


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Leek, potato & cheddar pie

Leek, potato & cheddar pie

If there was ever a time to bake a pie…

Leek, potato and cheddar pie
Serves 4-8 / Hands on time 1 hr 45 mins / Total time 2 hrs 15 mins + resting / V
You’ll need: 25cm flan tin (preferable with a removable bottom) / baking paper / rolling pin /
For the rough-puff pastry:
250g strong white bread flour
250g cold unsalted butter
1tsp sea salt flakes
100 ml cold water
For the filling:
150ml tap water
½ vegetable stock pot or cube
250g potatoes, cubed
250g leeks, trimmed and roughly chopped
½ white onion, peeled and chopped
100g mature vegetarian cheddar
1 egg, beaten

TIP: This recipe is split into 3 parts to give you the option of making the pie in stages – making a pie all in one day can be exhausting. I usually make the pastry the day before filling the pie and then refrigerate the pie over night before baking.

TIP: Alternatively, you can always use shop bought puff pastry.

PART 1:
Make the rough-puff pastry (Hands on time 45 mins + 30 mins resting)
1.
Mix the salt and the flour together in a large bowl before grating in a third of the cold butter. Using your hands, coat the butter in the flour before grating in another third of the butter and repeat with the last third. Adding the butter in batches makes it easier to incorporate.
2. Using your fingers, rub the butter loosely until it resembles breadcrumbs. This should take 10 to 15 mins so pop the radio on.
3. Make a well in the bowl and add 100 ml of cold water. Mix with a butter knife before using your hands to bring the crumbly dough together – being careful not to over work the dough.
4. Turn out onto a large piece of cling film and gather up the corners until you have a firm ball of pastry. Refrigerate for at least 30 mins. If making the filling the same day, use the next 30 mins to jump to PART 2.


5. Once the pastry has rested, remove from the fridge and turn out onto a lightly floured surface. Using your hands, mould the crumbly pastry into a rough rectangle (the pastry will be very crumbly but don’t let that scare you, it will start to come together at you roll it out). Flour your rolling pin and roll the pastry away from you in one direction only, until roughly three times the original length, flouring the surface as you go if needed.
6. Fold the top third of the pastry down to the centre, then the bottom third up and over that. Give the dough a quarter turn to the left or right, flour the surface and your rolling pin if needed and roll out again to three times the length in one direction.
7. Fold as before, before wrapping well in cling film and refrigerating again for at least 20 mins. The pastry can be kept refrigerated for up to 1 month or freeze for up to 6 months.

PART 2:
Make the filling (Hands on time 25 mins + cooling)
1. Chop 250g potatoes into cubes (I leave the skins on, but you can peel them if you prefer) and add them to a medium sized saucepan along with 150ml of tap water and half a stock cube or stock pot. Bring to the boil and cook over a high heat for 5 mins.
2. Add 250g of chopped leeks and half a chopped onion to the pan and simmer with the lid on for 8 mins or until the vegetables are tender and all the liquid has evaporated, stirring regularly.
3. Remove the pan from the heat and set aside to cool fully. The filling can be refrigerated for up to 5 days if you’re planning on assembling your pie another day.

PART 3:
Assemble the pie (Hands on time 30-35 mins + 30 mins baking time)
1. Grease the tin well and dust with flour before lining the base with baking paper. Put to one side.
2. Remove the chilled pastry from the fridge and turn out onto a lightly floured surface. Cut a third of the pastry off and put to one side (this will be your pastry top). Roll out the pastry until it’s a few millimetres thick and big enough to comfortably line the tin, flouring the surface and the rolling pin as you go.
3. Drape the pastry over the tin and carefully push the pastry into the edges and up the sides using your fingertips. You will need the overhanging pastry but trim off any excessively long pieces and put to one side (these will be used to decorate your pie later). Prick the bottom of the pastry with a fork and turn your attention back to the filling.
4. Grate the cheddar and incorporate into the cooled leek mixture. Season well with salt and black pepper before spooning into the tin. Spread the filling out evenly and put the pie to one side. Before you preheat your oven, line the bottom of the oven with foil to catch any melted butter. Preheat your oven to 220°C/200°C fan/425°F/gas mark 7.
5. Mould the third of the pastry you saved for the top into a ball and roll out on a floured surface. Using a sharp knife, cut out a circle, big enough to fit snugly over the exposed filling (this doesn’t need to be too perfect, if the pastry is slightly too big to sit comfortably in the tin simply trim more off).
6. Fold the excess pastry back in on top of the pie lid and crimp around the edges to give a decorative crust – again, this doesn’t have to be perfect.
7. Use any excess pastry you removed earlier to decorate the pie. I cut out leaf shapes but you can decorate your pie however you like. If you are planning on baking the pie another day, now is a good time to wrap it in clingfilm and refrigerate. Bring to room temperature before baking.
8. Egg wash the pie all over before making 2 small incisions in the centre to allow steam escape. Bake on the middle shelf for 30-35 mins or until the pastry is golden.
9. Allow the pie to cool for 10-15 mins before removing carefully from the tin and discarding the baking paper. I do this by placing a lightweight chopping board or plate over the top of the pie and flipping it on its head. This allows you to lift off the tin (do not do this when the pie is still hot as it may not hold its structure). Repeat the same trick with a cooling rack to get the pie right side up.
10. Serve warm or cold with a simple green salad.
The pie will last for up to 4 days wrapped up in the fridge.

Leek, potato & cheddar pie

Want more? Take your pie making skills to the next level by enrolling on the ultimate pie making course with River Cottage chef Tom Morrell. He will teach you all the skills necessary to make a variety of savoury pastry recipes – including shortcrust, rough puff, hot water crust and suet.

If you’ve had a go at making any of my recipes, I’d love to hear from you. Follow me now @ corrieheale and tag your recipe pictures using #corriesrabbitfood.


Baked bean curry

Serves: 2–4 | Total cost: £0.80 – £1.00

Open your mind (and fill your belly) with this exotic baked bean curry. Yes, that's 'exotic' and 'baked beans' being used in the same sentence.

Ingredients

  • 1 tin of baked beans
  • 1 tin of chopped tomatoes
  • 1 clove of garlic
  • About a thumbnail-sized piece of fresh ginger
  • 1 medium onion
  • Chopped fresh chilli or dry chilli flakes (use as much as you think you can handle)
  • 3 tablespoons of curry powder
  • 1 teaspoon of cumin
  • 1 teaspoon of dried coriander
  • Oil for frying.

Method

  1. Chop the onions, garlic and ginger (crush the garlic and ginger in a garlic crusher if you have one). Fry these in oil until the onion starts to go translucent.
  2. Add chilli flakes and all the spices and fry together for around a minute.
  3. Add the beans and tomatoes.
  4. Simmer on a medium heat for about 15 minutes until your curry is mixed well and piping hot.
  5. Serve with rice, naan bread, a baked potato, or whatever you fancy!

Leek, potato & cheddar pie

Leek, potato & cheddar pie

If there was ever a time to bake a pie…

Leek, potato and cheddar pie
Serves 4-8 / Hands on time 1 hr 45 mins / Total time 2 hrs 15 mins + resting / V
You’ll need: 25cm flan tin (preferable with a removable bottom) / baking paper / rolling pin /
For the rough-puff pastry:
250g strong white bread flour
250g cold unsalted butter
1tsp sea salt flakes
100 ml cold water
For the filling:
150ml tap water
½ vegetable stock pot or cube
250g potatoes, cubed
250g leeks, trimmed and roughly chopped
½ white onion, peeled and chopped
100g mature vegetarian cheddar
1 egg, beaten

TIP: This recipe is split into 3 parts to give you the option of making the pie in stages – making a pie all in one day can be exhausting. I usually make the pastry the day before filling the pie and then refrigerate the pie over night before baking.

TIP: Alternatively, you can always use shop bought puff pastry.

PART 1:
Make the rough-puff pastry (Hands on time 45 mins + 30 mins resting)
1.
Mix the salt and the flour together in a large bowl before grating in a third of the cold butter. Using your hands, coat the butter in the flour before grating in another third of the butter and repeat with the last third. Adding the butter in batches makes it easier to incorporate.
2. Using your fingers, rub the butter loosely until it resembles breadcrumbs. This should take 10 to 15 mins so pop the radio on.
3. Make a well in the bowl and add 100 ml of cold water. Mix with a butter knife before using your hands to bring the crumbly dough together – being careful not to over work the dough.
4. Turn out onto a large piece of cling film and gather up the corners until you have a firm ball of pastry. Refrigerate for at least 30 mins. If making the filling the same day, use the next 30 mins to jump to PART 2.


5. Once the pastry has rested, remove from the fridge and turn out onto a lightly floured surface. Using your hands, mould the crumbly pastry into a rough rectangle (the pastry will be very crumbly but don’t let that scare you, it will start to come together at you roll it out). Flour your rolling pin and roll the pastry away from you in one direction only, until roughly three times the original length, flouring the surface as you go if needed.
6. Fold the top third of the pastry down to the centre, then the bottom third up and over that. Give the dough a quarter turn to the left or right, flour the surface and your rolling pin if needed and roll out again to three times the length in one direction.
7. Fold as before, before wrapping well in cling film and refrigerating again for at least 20 mins. The pastry can be kept refrigerated for up to 1 month or freeze for up to 6 months.

PART 2:
Make the filling (Hands on time 25 mins + cooling)
1. Chop 250g potatoes into cubes (I leave the skins on, but you can peel them if you prefer) and add them to a medium sized saucepan along with 150ml of tap water and half a stock cube or stock pot. Bring to the boil and cook over a high heat for 5 mins.
2. Add 250g of chopped leeks and half a chopped onion to the pan and simmer with the lid on for 8 mins or until the vegetables are tender and all the liquid has evaporated, stirring regularly.
3. Remove the pan from the heat and set aside to cool fully. The filling can be refrigerated for up to 5 days if you’re planning on assembling your pie another day.

PART 3:
Assemble the pie (Hands on time 30-35 mins + 30 mins baking time)
1. Grease the tin well and dust with flour before lining the base with baking paper. Put to one side.
2. Remove the chilled pastry from the fridge and turn out onto a lightly floured surface. Cut a third of the pastry off and put to one side (this will be your pastry top). Roll out the pastry until it’s a few millimetres thick and big enough to comfortably line the tin, flouring the surface and the rolling pin as you go.
3. Drape the pastry over the tin and carefully push the pastry into the edges and up the sides using your fingertips. You will need the overhanging pastry but trim off any excessively long pieces and put to one side (these will be used to decorate your pie later). Prick the bottom of the pastry with a fork and turn your attention back to the filling.
4. Grate the cheddar and incorporate into the cooled leek mixture. Season well with salt and black pepper before spooning into the tin. Spread the filling out evenly and put the pie to one side. Before you preheat your oven, line the bottom of the oven with foil to catch any melted butter. Preheat your oven to 220°C/200°C fan/425°F/gas mark 7.
5. Mould the third of the pastry you saved for the top into a ball and roll out on a floured surface. Using a sharp knife, cut out a circle, big enough to fit snugly over the exposed filling (this doesn’t need to be too perfect, if the pastry is slightly too big to sit comfortably in the tin simply trim more off).
6. Fold the excess pastry back in on top of the pie lid and crimp around the edges to give a decorative crust – again, this doesn’t have to be perfect.
7. Use any excess pastry you removed earlier to decorate the pie. I cut out leaf shapes but you can decorate your pie however you like. If you are planning on baking the pie another day, now is a good time to wrap it in clingfilm and refrigerate. Bring to room temperature before baking.
8. Egg wash the pie all over before making 2 small incisions in the centre to allow steam escape. Bake on the middle shelf for 30-35 mins or until the pastry is golden.
9. Allow the pie to cool for 10-15 mins before removing carefully from the tin and discarding the baking paper. I do this by placing a lightweight chopping board or plate over the top of the pie and flipping it on its head. This allows you to lift off the tin (do not do this when the pie is still hot as it may not hold its structure). Repeat the same trick with a cooling rack to get the pie right side up.
10. Serve warm or cold with a simple green salad.
The pie will last for up to 4 days wrapped up in the fridge.

Leek, potato & cheddar pie

Want more? Take your pie making skills to the next level by enrolling on the ultimate pie making course with River Cottage chef Tom Morrell. He will teach you all the skills necessary to make a variety of savoury pastry recipes – including shortcrust, rough puff, hot water crust and suet.

If you’ve had a go at making any of my recipes, I’d love to hear from you. Follow me now @ corrieheale and tag your recipe pictures using #corriesrabbitfood.


Loaded Baked Potato Soup

So now that I work from home all day, I get to watch a lot of television. How I Met Your Mother, Grey’s Anatomy, Charmed, Law and Order SVU, Gilmore Girls – you name it (oh and btw, half these shows are on Lifetime, which is like the best network ever).

But yesterday I couldn’t watch my Grey’s reruns because they played A Walk to Remember instead. Now this movie came out when I was in the 8th grade, and I was completely googly-eyed over 24-year old Shane West. Now that it’s on 11 years later, nothing has changed, except I’m crying in almost every scene – when Shane West takes Mandy Moore to the state line and she’s in two places at once, or when he names a star after her – yeah, sob fest all over.

I think I need to get out more.

But the good thing about working from home is that I can raid the kitchen and gobble up anything and everything, like this loaded baked potato soup. This oh-so-creamy and rich, carb-loaded, cheesy, bacony, comforting, cozy soup that I can eat all day long. It’s honestly become one of my favorite soups ever, and I’ve had it 3 times this week already! With the melted cheddar and the crispy bacon bits, how can you resist?


St David’s Day Recipe

Having just moved to beautiful North Wales, just on the edge of the Snowdonia National Park, I am delighted to announce that I have partnered with Food and Drink Wales, who have asked me to create a Welsh inspired recipe for St David’s Day, using Welsh ingredients, naturally, in order to celebrate some of the fantastic produce that is coming out of Wales. Part of the Welsh Government’s #ThisisWales #GwladGlad campaign is to ensure that Wales and its first class produce are centre stage on the patron’s saint day on the 1st March, and, my special created recipe for Leek & Chicken Casserole with Baked Dumplings, uses locally sourced Welsh leeks, organic chicken and locally grown shallots and herbs, making it a wonderful dish to cook for all the family to celebrate St David’s Day and all that Wales has to offer by way of delicious, high quality food and produce. All that is needed to complete this hearty dish, is a bowl of steamed Blas Y Tir Welsh potatoes, dressed with a knob of salted Welsh butter and some fresh parsley.

Today’s recipe for Welsh Leek & Chicken Casserole with Baked Herb Dumplings would also make a fabulous Sunday lunch dish, as well as a hearty mid-week family supper dish. As regular Lavender and Lovage readers know, I try to cook seasonally and shop locally, and when you have some of the world’s best meat, poultry, vegetables and seafood on your doorstep, it makes sense to utilise it, whilst supporting your local community and the people who grow and produce it all. Living at the neck of the stunning Lleyn Peninsular, as well as vegetables, cheese, sea salt, butter, Welsh mountain lamb and Welsh beef, I have access to the most amazing seafood too, of which our favourites are the Menai oysters and mussels in nearby Anglesey. Wales, as a whole, and especially when I live in North Wales, is a veritable cornucopia of food and drink, which can be enjoyed in Wales, as well as outside Wales too, of course.

My St David’s Day recipe uses one of Wales’s most popular vegetables, as well as being one of the national emblems of Wales, the leek. Having lived with my maternal grandparents in Northumberland in England when I was little, I know and understand the importance of this humble vegetable, as it is an important symbol of growing and providing food for your family there, as it is in Wales there are numerous traditional Welsh recipes that use leeks, such as Cawl (Wales’s national dish), Glamorgan Sausages (Selsig Morgannwg) and Leek Pudding. The baked dumplings are very reminiscent of Welsh oatmeal dumplings, and have herbs added for extra colour and flavour. And, you don’t have to be in Wales or Welsh to enjoy my recipe, it’s a great winter warmer, especially with all this cold weather that has been blowing down from Siberia lately……you can use chicken breasts in place of chicken thighs, but I prefer chicken thighs for texture and flavour, and they hold up better in a casserole and don’t dry out.

The recipe for my special St David’s Day Welsh Leek & Chicken Casserole with Baked Herb Dumplings is shared below, in a printable recipe card and, I am also delighted to offer a fabulous giveaway, a St David’s Day Hamper filled with Welsh goodies and produce, on behalf of Food and Drink Wales, you can enter below, just below the recipe. I hope that you all enjoy St David’s Day on the 1st of March, wherever you may be in the world, and do let me know what you think of the recipe I created, if you make it, and DON’T forget to enter the Giveaway below, Dydd Gŵyl Dewi Hapus! Karen

*Collaborative post with Food and Drink Wales*


Cauliflower and Potato Bake (or soup. )

Just thought i'd share this recipe as my 16 mo DD loves it .

Ingredients:
1 medium onion - finely chopped
Butter
1 medium cauliflower
1 potato
300 ml Vegetable/ Chicken Stock (the heinz baby stock cubes are great as virtually no salt and much tastier than the adult no salt stock cubes)
300 ml Full fat milk
Cheese

1. Soften the onion in the butter in the bottom of a large saucepan
2. Wash to cauliflower and cut into small florets
3. Peel and cut potato into cubes
4. Add the cauliflower and potatoes to the onion
5. Add the stock and the milk (enough to completely cover the potatoes & cauliflower)
6. Bring to the boil and then gently simmer, stirring occasionally, until the ingredients are soft.
7. Spoon the cauliflower and potato with some of the liquid (a few spoon fulls) into a baking dish, top with a few breadcrumbs and some grated cheese and pop until the grill for a few mins!

This also doubles up as fantastic cauliflower and cheese soup. Follow steps 1 - 6 as above then. blend all the ingredients in a food processor or with a hand blender.

- Stir in some grated cheese before serving (don't add the cheese whilst on the heat as it can curdle :yuk:)