Traditional recipes

Marzipan and Walnut Sweets recipe

Marzipan and Walnut Sweets recipe

  • Recipes
  • Dish type
  • Sweets
  • No cook sweets

This is a super-easy recipe with delicious results. The perfect party nibble!

6 people made this

IngredientsMakes: 25 approximately

  • 250g dark brown soft sugar
  • 125ml water
  • 1 shot rum
  • 50g marzipan
  • icing sugar
  • 250g walnut halves

MethodPrep:20min ›Cook:10min ›Extra time:4hr setting › Ready in:4hr30min

  1. Boil sugar with water into a thick syrup. Add rum at the end.
  2. Sprinkle icing sugar over a work surface and roll the marzipan out over it.
  3. Press two walnut halves together with marzipan. Carefully insert a cocktail stick or toothpick into the marzipan. Coat with the syrup.
  4. Place on a baking tray with greased foil and allow to dry for several hours.

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Reviews & ratingsAverage global rating:(2)


BEST Marzipan and Almond Paste Recipe

Growing up in Germany, home to the world’s most famous marzipan, I was practically raised on this stuff. Well, not really, but I wouldn’t have protested had my parents tried :) If you’re looking for an authentic marzipan recipe that’s easy to make, is much cheaper than store-bought, and tastes absolutely phenomenal, you’ve come to the right place!

Marzipan is incredibly delicious. But it’s also really expensive to buy. The way around this? Make your own! The good news is that marzipan and almond past are also super easy and quick to make and now you can make your own anytime, anywhere. This is simply the BEST homemade marzipan!

Your life is forever changed.

I grew up on marzipan. It’s everywhere in Germany. Just a few hours north of where I grew up in Stuttgart is the historic town of Lübeck, world famous for its marzipan. It’s also a beautiful, scenic port town.

The Holstentor is Lübeck’s most famous feature, a Brick Gothic construction from Medieval times. It has been a UNESCO world heritage site since 1987.

Image courtesy Christian Wolf, CC licensing

Lübeck is also the home of Niederegger Marzipan, probably the most famous marzipan in the world. If I were to weigh how much of that marzipan I ate during my 23 years in Europe it would probably come close to 893 pounds. Niederegger has been around since 1806 producing the highest quality marzipan, including a class that is made from 100% almonds (no sugar), and it uses only the finest almonds from around the Mediterranean.

A Brief History Lesson (very brief)

Though marzipan has long been associated with Germany and Italy in particular, its roots are in the Orient. As far back as 850, a Persian doctor by the name of Rhazes praised the curative properties of almond and sugar paste. (See, now why can’t our doctors today be equally so inspired?) When the Crusaders returned to Europe from the Orient they brought this delicacy back with them. Initially only enjoyed by kings and the very wealthy, by the 19th century when sugar was being extracted from sugar beets, making it cheaper, marzipan became widely accessible. It has been a prized and popular treat ever since.

(history lesson over. see, I told you it was brief)

At the Niederegger Marzipan factory in Lübeck you can see a life-sized display of statues made from marzipan. It’s stunning! I can’t remember, but I would imagine its roped off to keep visitors, and their teeth, from getting too close.

Aside from being dipped in chocolate, wrapped and sold, marzipan is also often shaped into various figures, including fruits and vegetables that look real-life. If you’re crafty, marzipan is a fun medium to work with.

And of course marzipan is incorporated into deliciously decadent cakes and baked goods.

Here are just a couple of baked goods on our site featuring marzipan and if you type “marzipan” into the search box at the top right of the screen you’ll find several more.

So yes, marzipan is a wonderful, wonderful thing. But it’s also an expensive thing. When you buy almond paste it usually comes in very small quantities with a pretty hefty price tag for what you get. That’s why I’m sharing this recipe with you. So that you can make it at a tiny fraction of the cost and have it on hand whenever you need it. And it’s SO quick and easy to make!

Marzipan vs. Almond Paste – What’s the Difference?

In part it comes down to where you live. In Europe it’s widely referred to as marzipan whereas here in North American the term almond paste is more common. But there’s also a difference in the ratio of almonds to sugar as well as consistency. Almond paste is softer and is used in baked goods. Marzipan is firmer and is used in making candies/chocolates or as fondant for cakes. Marzipan also uses rose water. To adjust this recipe according to what you’re using it for, follow this recipe as instructed for almond paste (I still include the rose water because it tastes amazing), or add an extra 1/4 cup or more of ground almonds until you reach a firmer consistency (one that you can roll out with a rolling pin without it sticking).

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You can either blanch and grind your own almonds or buy almond meal/flour, which is quicker and more convenient and will yield a more consistent product. The almond meal needs to be completely dried and grinding your own will produce an almond meal that is “wet” because it still has a lot of oil in it. Many large grocery stores carry almond meal. I use and like Bob’s Red Mill Super Fine Almond Meal/Flour. Be sure to get almond meal that’s made from blanched almonds (skins removed). If you can’t find it locally, you can also conveniently purchase almond meal online (this particular one is “super finely” ground which is recommended for marzipan.

Add the almond meal to a food processor. I like to use my little Cuisinart food processor for jobs like this. Over 10 years old and still going strong!

Add the powdered sugar to the almond meal and pulse to combine and break up any lumps.

*Diabetics or those looking for a sugar-free marzipan / almond paste option, you can use Swerve Confectioner Sweetener.

Almond paste uses almond extract only. Marzipan also uses rose water for a positively delightful flavor.

There are varying degrees of quality when you buy rose water. Some are inexpensive, some are very expensive (and some of those aren’t even necessarily better). A brand that I’m happy with is Cortas and it is very reasonably priced with good reviews. You can purchase it online here. A bottle of it will last you forever.

Whichever brand you buy, make absolutely sure it is food grade rose water.

You also want to use good quality almond extract. You can find it in many grocery stores or purchase almond extract online here.

Add the rose water and almond extract and pulse to combine.

Add the egg white. Egg white is the traditional moistener. If that worries you, keep in mind that eggs are pasteurized. If you’re still concerned about that, read the “Note” in the recipe box.

Process the ingredients until it comes together in a firm mass.

If it’s too wet, add more powdered sugar and ground almonds. Keep in mind though that it will become firmer after it’s been refrigerated.

Turn the dough out onto a work surface and knead it a few times just to make sure all the ingredients are fully combined.

Form the dough into a log, ball or disc and wrap it tightly in plastic wrap.

The marzipan will keep in the refrigerator for several weeks (provided you used very fresh egg white).


East Indian Marzipan Recipe

Here is the recipe we use. Marzipan No 2 modified to granny&rsquos measurements. Dad&rsquos side does Mazripan No 1, but don&rsquot you think it&rsquos really tedious to blanch the almonds?

  • Half kg Cashewnuts
  • Three quarter kg ground Sugar
  • 4 Egg Whites
  • 1 chowni Rose Water (for kneading)
  • 1 to 2 chownis Rose Water (for grinding)
  • 2 to 3 drops Almond Essence

* Note : Chownis aka East Indian wine glasses usually measure 30 ml or 45 ml. We use the 45 ml measurement.

Angels, stars, santa, bells and tree shaped Marzipan

Grind the cashewnuts to a paste with rose water. Aren&rsquot we lucky that nowadays we can use the mixie and don&rsquot need to grind cashewnuts on the patha? That&rsquos probably why our grandparents were stronger than us. They worked harder.

By the way, cashewnuts and almonds are essentially gluten free, but may come in contact with other ingredients that contain gluten depending on the facility in which they&rsquore processed. So if you want to ensure that your marzipan is gluten free, just get your nuts from the right facility. Did that sound corny? Haha!

Sprinkle a thali or thala with powder sugar and keep aside.

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Add the cashew paste to the egg whites

Next, put the cashewnut paste into a toap (vessel) along with the ground sugar, almond essence, and egg whites that have been beaten to a stiff froth.

On a low flame, stir till it reaches a wax like consistency. Seriously, that&rsquos a lot a stirring. If you&rsquove helped with stirring sweets as a kid, you&rsquoll have strong arms.

Pour the marzipan into a flat thali Colored marzipan balls

Once the mixture is quite dry, pour it into a thala aka thali and knead till it&rsquos mouldable. Form into 4 or 5 different colored balls and set aside.

Next, sprinkle the moulds with some powdered sugar. Mould the marzipan into tiny balls and place into moulds till they form the required shapes. Turn the mould over and hit it on the back with the wooden spoon so that the shapes pop out. Collect them and place or thalies or trays. Leave out to dry overnight.

We make about 150 to 160 pieces with this recipe using average sized moulds. If you use the bigger flowers and leaves, you should get about 120 pieces. And that&rsquos it. The marzipan is ready to be sent out to friends and family.

Colourful Marzipan for Christmas

Honey Glazed Walnut

The honey glazed walnut can be used with salads. You can also munch them as a snack.

Step 1: Line a baking tray with parchment paper or foil and keep aside.

Step 2: Heat a pan. Add the butter. Once the butter starts melting, add the honey and the walnuts and mix well on medium heat. Keep on mixing well till the honey starts caramelizing and coating the walnuts. This will take 8 to 10 minutes.

Step 3: Transfer to the tray. Spread out with a fork.

4 Comments

Your receipe are very easy to follow for a person who doesn’t know to cook. I will surely make Christmas sweets this year. Thank you very much. God bless you


Recipe for Date and Walnut Cake

As I have already said, Date and Walnut Cake Recipes are simple with basic cake ingredients. You make it just like you would make any simple cake recipe and add the dates and walnuts to the end. The cake becomes dense and the baking time will vary from one hour to one hour ten minutes or even more.

  • DATES – Use fresh dates for this recipe. The quantity of dates for this date and walnut cake is more and this gives a rich dark colour to the cake. You could choose to use fewer dates and your cake will still turn out to be delicious but less moist. Chop the dates and then soak them in hot water with some baking soda. This will soften the dates and keep the cake moist during baking.
  • WALNUTS – Use only little chopped walnuts in this recipe. Walnuts will give the cake some crunch that is much needed for this moist cake. Dates and Walnuts make an awesome combination and you will love every bite of this cake.
  • EGGS – We use whole eggs for this cake. I am yet to try the Date and Walnut Cake Eggless recipe and then I’ll give you the substitute for eggs.
  • BUTTER – Use either salted or unsalted butter for this Date and Walnut Cake. I have never substituted butter with oil but I am sure using oil in this recipe will yield a more moist cake just like my Moist Carrot Cake with Walnut and Raisins.
  • SUGAR – Use caster sugar for this recipe or simply grind granulated white sugar in your grinder. You could also use the brown sugar for a rich and darker cake.
  • ALL-PURPOSE FLOUR – This particular recipe for Dates and Walnuts Cake calls for all-purpose flour.
  • BAKING POWDER & BAKING SODA – We use both, baking powder as well as baking soda for this recipe but in different ways, We add baking soda to the chopped dates with hot water to soften them. Add baking powder while mixing the cake just like you would do for any other cake recipe.
  • VANILLA ESSENCE – Adding one teaspoon of vanilla essence to this cake batter gives it an exotic flavour.

Homemade Marzipan

Hello my lovelies! This isn’t the prettiest recipe. But it’s useful. And much cheaper than running out to get expensive imported store-bought marzipan when a recipe calls for it. This is one of those back pocket tricks. And it’s bizarrely easy. Like why haven’t we been doing this all along? I am a total fool for marzipan as a treat. Chocolate covered marzipan is up there with liquorice and those chai flavoured chocolate almonds from my local supermarket in the compulsive eating stakes. I really shouldn’t have made it while I’m trying not to eat treats. The things I do for you guys! Anyway. This is best if you make it for prompt use in a specific project but it can hang out in the fridge if you wrap it well. Don’t want it to taste like fridge.

We need to get our ground almonds as fine as possible. Of my kitchen arsenal the tool that does the best job is my bullet blender. I blitz the ground almonds in small batches. But only for a couple of seconds. It’s important not to end up with almond butter. If you don’t have a blender like that then a food processor does the job. Put the almonds in on their own and pulse until quite fine.

Add the icing sugar and process to combine. You should have a pretty fine powder now.

Still in the food processor, add the egg white a little at a time until it comes together in a dough. If you aren’t using a food processor then work the egg white into the almonds and sugar using a wooden spoon.

Add the flavourings and pulse a couple of times to distribute them. If you like things very almond-y like I do then add the larger amount of extract. Lightly dust the bench with a little icing sugar and tip out the marzipan.

Bring it together with your hands. It should be almost sticky, but not quite. If it feels dry work in a teaspoon or two of water with your hands. Work it into a cohesive block.

Wrap tightly with clingfilm or put it in a zip lock bag. Chill for at least 2 hours before using. Drying out is the enemy. Make sure you wrap it well.

That’s literally it. Use it in any recipe that calls for marzipan. Add a layer under fondant or royal icing on a fruit cake. Make a log, cut slices and bake until golden for bite-sized chewy almond-y cookies. Cut into pieces and dip in dark chocolate. Endless possibilities. I won’t even judge you for pulling little bits off and eating them out of the fridge.

Like this recipe? Pin for later or Print for right now:

Homemade Marzipan

Simple delicious fresh marzipan ready for any recipe.

Ingredients:

  • 200 grams ground almonds
  • 200 grams icing sugar
  • 1 large egg white
  • 1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon almond extract
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • optional: a few drops bitter almond extract

– If using metric cups, reduce volume measures by 1 tablespoon for every cup of dry or liquid ingredients –

Equipment:

Directions:

We need to get our ground almonds as fine as possible. Of my kitchen arsenal the tool that does the best job is my bullet blender. I blitz the ground almonds in small batches. But only for a couple of seconds. It’s important not to end up with almond butter. If you don’t have a blender like that then a food processor does the job. Put the almonds in on their own and pulse until quite fine.

Add the icing sugar and process to combine. You should have a pretty fine powder now.

Still in the food processor, add the egg white a little at a time until it comes together in a dough.

Add the flavourings and pulse a couple of times to distribute them. Lightly dust the bench with a little icing sugar and tip out the marzipan.

Bring it together with your hands. Work it into a cohesive block.

Wrap tightly with clingfilm or put it in a zip lock bag. Chill for at least 2 hours before using.

That’s literally it. Use it in any recipe that calls for marzipan. Add a layer under fondant or royal icing on a fruit cake. Make a log, cut slices and bake until golden for bite-sized chewy almond-y cookies. Cut into pieces and dip in dark chocolate. Endless possibilities.

Cook’s Notes:

  • Marzipan can be flavoured how you like, if you need it to match the flavours of a specific recipe you can add those flavours as you make it
  • While I have never had an issue using egg whites in recipes like this, if you are immuno-compromised or concerned about the safety of using egg whites, they can be replaced with an equal volume of corn syrup or water. Add it a tablespoon at a time until the marzipan comes together. The texture may not hold up as well though.
  • Experiment with different ground nuts to change the flavour. If you are intending to make chocolate covered marzipan bites, try adding some pistachios or hazelnuts.

– Store marzipan in the fridge for up to a month, though it is preferable to make smaller batches to use straight away. –

© 2017 The Winsome Baker. All images & content are copyright protected. Please do not use my images without prior permission. If you want to republish this recipe, please re-write the recipe in your own words, or link back to this post for the recipe.


How to make marzipan

The origins of marzipan are unclear there is a dispute between Persia, Hungary and Germany who all lay claim to the invention of a paste of sugar and almonds. The origins of the name are even more bizarre some contenders being a Burmese city, a military commander and the ‘bread of March’. Wherever it came from, in the UK marzipan is most commonly associated with icing Christmas cakes.

Many people buy marzipan as they consider it a fuss to make however, it is actually relatively easy and homemade marzipan can contain up to 50% less sugar. The almond flavour is also much stronger and you don't have the addition of colourings and preservatives.

If you'd like to learn how to ice a Christmas cake follow our a step-by-step guide.


  • 110g (4oz) ground almonds
  • 100g (3 1/2oz) castor sugar
  • 1/2 small egg
  • a drop of pure almond extract
  • 1/4 tablespoons Irish whiskey
  1. Split one side of the date and remove the stone. Roll a little piece of marzipan into an oblong shape so that it will fit neatly into the opening.
  2. Smooth the top and roll the stuffed date in castor sugar.
  3. Repeat the procedure until all the dates and marzipan are used up.
  4. Serve as a petit four or as part of a selection of homemade sweets.
  1. Sieve the castor sugar and mix with the ground almonds.
  2. Beat the egg, add the whiskey and 1 drop of pure almond extract, then add to the other ingredients and mix to a stiff paste. (You may not need all of the egg).
  3. Sprinkle the work top with icing sugar, turn out the almond paste and work lightly until smooth.

Variations
Medjool Dates with Pistachio and Marzipan

Dip the top of the stuffed date in finely chopped unsalted pistachio nuts.
Serve as above

Medjool Dates with Walnuts
Stone the dates but keep attached, slip a walnut into each and press closed.

Medjool Dates with Candied Orange Peel
Stone the dates but keep attached, slip a sliver of candied orange peel (see recipe) into each and press closed.

Medjool Dates with Candied Pecan Nut
Stone the dates but keep attached, slip a candied pecan nut into each and press closed.


Marzipan Christmas Cookies (Paleo, Gluten-Free)


Christmas cookie season has begun. Christmas is one of my favorite times of year and its seasonal treats have a special place in my heart (and stomach). The only problem of course is not letting the sugar send you into the downward spiral that is the sugar binge. Classic iced holiday cookies are often so sweet that they immediately give you that sugar high jolt followed shortly by the inevitable crash. This year I’ve been testing out a few recipes to satisfy my sweet tooth without going overboard.

I’m half-German so when it comes to Christmas cookies I crave almond, anise, and molasses. One of my favorite recipes is the Bethmännchen marzipan cookie. Because of its almond base and mildly sweet flavor, it’s the perfect cookie to tweak with a healthy twist.
.

Marzipan Christmas Cookies (Paleo, Gluten-Free)

DIRECTIONS

In a food processor, blend almond flour with maple syrup, vanilla extract, and almond extract. Almond extract can be strong, so start by adding 1/4 teaspoon and bump it up from there. Blend until a thick paste is formed. This is your marzipan.
.
Next, separate the egg and set the yolk aside. Toss the egg white into your processor along with the arrowroot powder and additional almond flour. Your cookie dough will be thick and a little sticky. If it’s too sticky, you can add an additional teaspoon or two of almond flour. Scoop the dough into plastic wrap and chill in the fridge for an hour.
.
Meanwhile preheat your oven to 275F and line a baking tray with parchment paper. Once ready, take out your chilled dough and using your hands form it into small balls (about the size of a walnut). Using your hands, form little balls the size of a small walnuts and place them on the baking tray. It’s easier to roll balls if your hands are moistened. Place on baking tray they don’t spread so you can crowd them fairly close.
.
Mix your reserved egg yolk with 1 tablespoon water and brush it across the top of your cookies. Decorate with three sliced almonds and bake for about 25 minutes. If you want to be really traditional you can use blanched almond halves, but it won’t make or break the recipe. I underbake mine because I like to make sure the insides were still nice and soft.
.
Once they’re done, let cool for a few minutes before taste testing. This recipe serves 2-4 people (the cookies are small so the definition of a serving size is open to interpretation).
.

All lined up on the baking tray. The nice thing about these cookies is that they don’t rise much or spread, so you can really pack them in on your baking sheet.

I love how pretty and delicate they look. They’ll be the classiest cookie on the block.

They were the perfect accompaniment to my afternoon cup of earl grey tea.

.
These cookies are great for parties, although make sure you at least double or triple the recipe. Most hosts I know try to get rid of leftover sweets when the night is over, but these are subtly sweet enough that he/she might just want to keep a few.

What is your favorite holiday cookie? Gingerbread? Chocolate anything? Mil’s signature is her rum balls. Also, has anyone been watching The Great Holiday Baking Show?
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Watch the video: Professional Baker Teaches You How To Make MARZIPAN! (January 2022).