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Anheuser-Busch Buys 40 Tesla Trucks to Deliver Beer

Anheuser-Busch Buys 40 Tesla Trucks to Deliver Beer

Budweiser will travel on a fleet of electric Tesla trucks

Dreamstime

Anheuser-Busch is adding 40 Tesla trucks to its fleet.

Tesla says its upcoming electric big-rig semi trucks are the future of trucking, and Anheuser-Busch is one of the first companies to place an order. The trucks are scheduled to go into production in 2019, and Anheuser-Busch has already placed an order for 40, which the company says it will use to deliver beer.

Anheuser-Busch announced this week that it plans to use the Tesla trucks to ship beer from its breweries to wholesalers. Tesla says the trucks will be able to travel 500 miles on one charge. Anheuser-Busch has 21 breweries, and the trucks will be making deliveries to wholesalers within 150 to 200 miles of them.

According to Yahoo Finance, Anheuser-Busch already has 750 trucks and spends $120 million a year on fuel. Using the Tesla trucks could have an enormous impact on the company’s fuel costs, and also its environmental impact.

"Integrating the Tesla semi-trucks into the brewer's distribution network will help Anheuser-Busch achieve its commitment to reduce its operational carbon footprint by 30 percent by 2025 – the equivalent of removing nearly 500,000 cars from the road globally each year," the company said.

Shipping and delivery is an enormous part of the beer industry, and Anheuser-Busch is reportedly also looking at other electric-powered trucks that are expected to come to the market soon. For more fascinating facts about the beer industry, here are 10 things you didn’t know about beer.


‘The future of beer delivery’: Anheuser-Busch orders 40 Tesla electric self-driving trucks

Picture: Tesla

The trucks will be fully electric-powered, helping Anheuser-Busch reach its commitment to reduce its operational carbon footprint by 30% by 2025 (which equates to taking nearly 500,000 cars off the road).

“We can’t wait to get these trucks on the road, and keep leading our industry forward to a greener, smarter future in partnership with some of the world’s most innovative companies,”​ said James Sembrot, senior director of Logistics Strategy.

“The transportation industry is evolving fast, and we’re really excited to play a leadership role in driving this evolution by integrating these new technologies across our network.”

Last year Anheuser-Busch carried out the world’s first commercial shipment via a self-driving truck:​​ transporting a trailer of Budweiser across 120 miles (193km) along the I-25 from Fort Collins to Colorado Springs.

Anheuser-Busch is also working on partnerships with other transport developers: such as Nikola (to develop and implement hydrogen-powered engines) Otto and Uber Freight (testing autonomous driving technology) and Convoy (accessing on-demand trucking capability).

Self-driving trucks

As the largest brewer in the US, Anheuser-Busch ships more than 1.2 million truckloads a year.

In the case of the self-driving truck, a human driver is still involved with pickup and loading. However, once on the interstate highway, the truck can be switched to a self-driving mode.

This means drivers would be able to rest on long stretches of highway, thus offering the potential to extend productive hours without compromising on safety.


‘The future of beer delivery’: Anheuser-Busch orders 40 Tesla electric self-driving trucks

Picture: Tesla

The trucks will be fully electric-powered, helping Anheuser-Busch reach its commitment to reduce its operational carbon footprint by 30% by 2025 (which equates to taking nearly 500,000 cars off the road).

“We can’t wait to get these trucks on the road, and keep leading our industry forward to a greener, smarter future in partnership with some of the world’s most innovative companies,”​ said James Sembrot, senior director of Logistics Strategy.

“The transportation industry is evolving fast, and we’re really excited to play a leadership role in driving this evolution by integrating these new technologies across our network.”

Last year Anheuser-Busch carried out the world’s first commercial shipment via a self-driving truck:​​ transporting a trailer of Budweiser across 120 miles (193km) along the I-25 from Fort Collins to Colorado Springs.

Anheuser-Busch is also working on partnerships with other transport developers: such as Nikola (to develop and implement hydrogen-powered engines) Otto and Uber Freight (testing autonomous driving technology) and Convoy (accessing on-demand trucking capability).

Self-driving trucks

As the largest brewer in the US, Anheuser-Busch ships more than 1.2 million truckloads a year.

In the case of the self-driving truck, a human driver is still involved with pickup and loading. However, once on the interstate highway, the truck can be switched to a self-driving mode.

This means drivers would be able to rest on long stretches of highway, thus offering the potential to extend productive hours without compromising on safety.


‘The future of beer delivery’: Anheuser-Busch orders 40 Tesla electric self-driving trucks

Picture: Tesla

The trucks will be fully electric-powered, helping Anheuser-Busch reach its commitment to reduce its operational carbon footprint by 30% by 2025 (which equates to taking nearly 500,000 cars off the road).

“We can’t wait to get these trucks on the road, and keep leading our industry forward to a greener, smarter future in partnership with some of the world’s most innovative companies,”​ said James Sembrot, senior director of Logistics Strategy.

“The transportation industry is evolving fast, and we’re really excited to play a leadership role in driving this evolution by integrating these new technologies across our network.”

Last year Anheuser-Busch carried out the world’s first commercial shipment via a self-driving truck:​​ transporting a trailer of Budweiser across 120 miles (193km) along the I-25 from Fort Collins to Colorado Springs.

Anheuser-Busch is also working on partnerships with other transport developers: such as Nikola (to develop and implement hydrogen-powered engines) Otto and Uber Freight (testing autonomous driving technology) and Convoy (accessing on-demand trucking capability).

Self-driving trucks

As the largest brewer in the US, Anheuser-Busch ships more than 1.2 million truckloads a year.

In the case of the self-driving truck, a human driver is still involved with pickup and loading. However, once on the interstate highway, the truck can be switched to a self-driving mode.

This means drivers would be able to rest on long stretches of highway, thus offering the potential to extend productive hours without compromising on safety.


‘The future of beer delivery’: Anheuser-Busch orders 40 Tesla electric self-driving trucks

Picture: Tesla

The trucks will be fully electric-powered, helping Anheuser-Busch reach its commitment to reduce its operational carbon footprint by 30% by 2025 (which equates to taking nearly 500,000 cars off the road).

“We can’t wait to get these trucks on the road, and keep leading our industry forward to a greener, smarter future in partnership with some of the world’s most innovative companies,”​ said James Sembrot, senior director of Logistics Strategy.

“The transportation industry is evolving fast, and we’re really excited to play a leadership role in driving this evolution by integrating these new technologies across our network.”

Last year Anheuser-Busch carried out the world’s first commercial shipment via a self-driving truck:​​ transporting a trailer of Budweiser across 120 miles (193km) along the I-25 from Fort Collins to Colorado Springs.

Anheuser-Busch is also working on partnerships with other transport developers: such as Nikola (to develop and implement hydrogen-powered engines) Otto and Uber Freight (testing autonomous driving technology) and Convoy (accessing on-demand trucking capability).

Self-driving trucks

As the largest brewer in the US, Anheuser-Busch ships more than 1.2 million truckloads a year.

In the case of the self-driving truck, a human driver is still involved with pickup and loading. However, once on the interstate highway, the truck can be switched to a self-driving mode.

This means drivers would be able to rest on long stretches of highway, thus offering the potential to extend productive hours without compromising on safety.


‘The future of beer delivery’: Anheuser-Busch orders 40 Tesla electric self-driving trucks

Picture: Tesla

The trucks will be fully electric-powered, helping Anheuser-Busch reach its commitment to reduce its operational carbon footprint by 30% by 2025 (which equates to taking nearly 500,000 cars off the road).

“We can’t wait to get these trucks on the road, and keep leading our industry forward to a greener, smarter future in partnership with some of the world’s most innovative companies,”​ said James Sembrot, senior director of Logistics Strategy.

“The transportation industry is evolving fast, and we’re really excited to play a leadership role in driving this evolution by integrating these new technologies across our network.”

Last year Anheuser-Busch carried out the world’s first commercial shipment via a self-driving truck:​​ transporting a trailer of Budweiser across 120 miles (193km) along the I-25 from Fort Collins to Colorado Springs.

Anheuser-Busch is also working on partnerships with other transport developers: such as Nikola (to develop and implement hydrogen-powered engines) Otto and Uber Freight (testing autonomous driving technology) and Convoy (accessing on-demand trucking capability).

Self-driving trucks

As the largest brewer in the US, Anheuser-Busch ships more than 1.2 million truckloads a year.

In the case of the self-driving truck, a human driver is still involved with pickup and loading. However, once on the interstate highway, the truck can be switched to a self-driving mode.

This means drivers would be able to rest on long stretches of highway, thus offering the potential to extend productive hours without compromising on safety.


‘The future of beer delivery’: Anheuser-Busch orders 40 Tesla electric self-driving trucks

Picture: Tesla

The trucks will be fully electric-powered, helping Anheuser-Busch reach its commitment to reduce its operational carbon footprint by 30% by 2025 (which equates to taking nearly 500,000 cars off the road).

“We can’t wait to get these trucks on the road, and keep leading our industry forward to a greener, smarter future in partnership with some of the world’s most innovative companies,”​ said James Sembrot, senior director of Logistics Strategy.

“The transportation industry is evolving fast, and we’re really excited to play a leadership role in driving this evolution by integrating these new technologies across our network.”

Last year Anheuser-Busch carried out the world’s first commercial shipment via a self-driving truck:​​ transporting a trailer of Budweiser across 120 miles (193km) along the I-25 from Fort Collins to Colorado Springs.

Anheuser-Busch is also working on partnerships with other transport developers: such as Nikola (to develop and implement hydrogen-powered engines) Otto and Uber Freight (testing autonomous driving technology) and Convoy (accessing on-demand trucking capability).

Self-driving trucks

As the largest brewer in the US, Anheuser-Busch ships more than 1.2 million truckloads a year.

In the case of the self-driving truck, a human driver is still involved with pickup and loading. However, once on the interstate highway, the truck can be switched to a self-driving mode.

This means drivers would be able to rest on long stretches of highway, thus offering the potential to extend productive hours without compromising on safety.


‘The future of beer delivery’: Anheuser-Busch orders 40 Tesla electric self-driving trucks

Picture: Tesla

The trucks will be fully electric-powered, helping Anheuser-Busch reach its commitment to reduce its operational carbon footprint by 30% by 2025 (which equates to taking nearly 500,000 cars off the road).

“We can’t wait to get these trucks on the road, and keep leading our industry forward to a greener, smarter future in partnership with some of the world’s most innovative companies,”​ said James Sembrot, senior director of Logistics Strategy.

“The transportation industry is evolving fast, and we’re really excited to play a leadership role in driving this evolution by integrating these new technologies across our network.”

Last year Anheuser-Busch carried out the world’s first commercial shipment via a self-driving truck:​​ transporting a trailer of Budweiser across 120 miles (193km) along the I-25 from Fort Collins to Colorado Springs.

Anheuser-Busch is also working on partnerships with other transport developers: such as Nikola (to develop and implement hydrogen-powered engines) Otto and Uber Freight (testing autonomous driving technology) and Convoy (accessing on-demand trucking capability).

Self-driving trucks

As the largest brewer in the US, Anheuser-Busch ships more than 1.2 million truckloads a year.

In the case of the self-driving truck, a human driver is still involved with pickup and loading. However, once on the interstate highway, the truck can be switched to a self-driving mode.

This means drivers would be able to rest on long stretches of highway, thus offering the potential to extend productive hours without compromising on safety.


‘The future of beer delivery’: Anheuser-Busch orders 40 Tesla electric self-driving trucks

Picture: Tesla

The trucks will be fully electric-powered, helping Anheuser-Busch reach its commitment to reduce its operational carbon footprint by 30% by 2025 (which equates to taking nearly 500,000 cars off the road).

“We can’t wait to get these trucks on the road, and keep leading our industry forward to a greener, smarter future in partnership with some of the world’s most innovative companies,”​ said James Sembrot, senior director of Logistics Strategy.

“The transportation industry is evolving fast, and we’re really excited to play a leadership role in driving this evolution by integrating these new technologies across our network.”

Last year Anheuser-Busch carried out the world’s first commercial shipment via a self-driving truck:​​ transporting a trailer of Budweiser across 120 miles (193km) along the I-25 from Fort Collins to Colorado Springs.

Anheuser-Busch is also working on partnerships with other transport developers: such as Nikola (to develop and implement hydrogen-powered engines) Otto and Uber Freight (testing autonomous driving technology) and Convoy (accessing on-demand trucking capability).

Self-driving trucks

As the largest brewer in the US, Anheuser-Busch ships more than 1.2 million truckloads a year.

In the case of the self-driving truck, a human driver is still involved with pickup and loading. However, once on the interstate highway, the truck can be switched to a self-driving mode.

This means drivers would be able to rest on long stretches of highway, thus offering the potential to extend productive hours without compromising on safety.


‘The future of beer delivery’: Anheuser-Busch orders 40 Tesla electric self-driving trucks

Picture: Tesla

The trucks will be fully electric-powered, helping Anheuser-Busch reach its commitment to reduce its operational carbon footprint by 30% by 2025 (which equates to taking nearly 500,000 cars off the road).

“We can’t wait to get these trucks on the road, and keep leading our industry forward to a greener, smarter future in partnership with some of the world’s most innovative companies,”​ said James Sembrot, senior director of Logistics Strategy.

“The transportation industry is evolving fast, and we’re really excited to play a leadership role in driving this evolution by integrating these new technologies across our network.”

Last year Anheuser-Busch carried out the world’s first commercial shipment via a self-driving truck:​​ transporting a trailer of Budweiser across 120 miles (193km) along the I-25 from Fort Collins to Colorado Springs.

Anheuser-Busch is also working on partnerships with other transport developers: such as Nikola (to develop and implement hydrogen-powered engines) Otto and Uber Freight (testing autonomous driving technology) and Convoy (accessing on-demand trucking capability).

Self-driving trucks

As the largest brewer in the US, Anheuser-Busch ships more than 1.2 million truckloads a year.

In the case of the self-driving truck, a human driver is still involved with pickup and loading. However, once on the interstate highway, the truck can be switched to a self-driving mode.

This means drivers would be able to rest on long stretches of highway, thus offering the potential to extend productive hours without compromising on safety.


‘The future of beer delivery’: Anheuser-Busch orders 40 Tesla electric self-driving trucks

Picture: Tesla

The trucks will be fully electric-powered, helping Anheuser-Busch reach its commitment to reduce its operational carbon footprint by 30% by 2025 (which equates to taking nearly 500,000 cars off the road).

“We can’t wait to get these trucks on the road, and keep leading our industry forward to a greener, smarter future in partnership with some of the world’s most innovative companies,”​ said James Sembrot, senior director of Logistics Strategy.

“The transportation industry is evolving fast, and we’re really excited to play a leadership role in driving this evolution by integrating these new technologies across our network.”

Last year Anheuser-Busch carried out the world’s first commercial shipment via a self-driving truck:​​ transporting a trailer of Budweiser across 120 miles (193km) along the I-25 from Fort Collins to Colorado Springs.

Anheuser-Busch is also working on partnerships with other transport developers: such as Nikola (to develop and implement hydrogen-powered engines) Otto and Uber Freight (testing autonomous driving technology) and Convoy (accessing on-demand trucking capability).

Self-driving trucks

As the largest brewer in the US, Anheuser-Busch ships more than 1.2 million truckloads a year.

In the case of the self-driving truck, a human driver is still involved with pickup and loading. However, once on the interstate highway, the truck can be switched to a self-driving mode.

This means drivers would be able to rest on long stretches of highway, thus offering the potential to extend productive hours without compromising on safety.


Watch the video: 150 YEARS OF BUDWEISER HISTORY, IN 2 MINUTES (January 2022).