Traditional recipes

Two-ingredient chocolate mousse recipe

Two-ingredient chocolate mousse recipe

  • Recipes
  • Dish type
  • Dessert
  • Mousse
  • Chocolate mousse

I made this today to use up some tofu I had in my cupboard and It was delicious! It was all gone in an hour and it hadn't even been in the fridge to set. It is an extremely simple recipe which can be altered to your taste and only uses two ingredients! You could even use leftover Easter eggs for the chocolate in the recipe.


London, England, UK

3 people made this

IngredientsServes: 4

  • 1 pack silken tofu, drained
  • 1 large bar Cadbury's® chocolate, roughly chopped

MethodPrep:5min ›Cook:2min ›Extra time:2hr setting › Ready in:2hr7min

  1. Place the tofu into a blender or food processor and set aside.
  2. Place the chocolate in a microwave-safe bowl then microwave in increments of 30 seconds until melted, stirring often. Ensure there are no lumps then pour over the silken tofu.
  3. Blend or process the tofu and the chocolate until it is thoroughly mixed together and it has turned into a light brown colour. Pour the mousse into a big serving bowl, or if you prefer into small single dishes. Then put in the fridge (or if you can't resist eat straight away) for at least 2 hours and enjoy!

Tip

This made only about 4 servings for me but you can double the ingredients,You could also try this recipe with other types of chocolate like Galaxy®, Lindor® or Bourneville®. You DON'T need cooking or plain chocolate, you can use what ever type you want. You could even use up some Easter eggs.

Optional toppings

Cherries, chocolate shavings, chocolate chips, sprinkles, etc.

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Two Ingredient Chocolate Mousse

Ok so maybe it’s not really two ingredient chocolate mousse since I added peanut butter & maple syrup to mine.

But it can totally be two ingredient chocolate mousse if you leave those two things out!

Silken tofu and chocolate together make for an excellent chocolate mousse, although I will be honest it does seem more like pudding than mousse, but hey what can I tell ya!?

You will be so surprised at how easy this is to make and how awesome it tastes with no lingering “tofu taste” as some desserts made from todu can have!

I did use dark chocolate (72% cacao) for this which is why it was necessary (in my opinion) to add that maple syrup for added sweetness and peanut butter… well.. it’s peanut butter!

Definitely not necessary and this recipe will still be great, but again if your chocolate is sweeter than mine (like a 56% may be better) you won’t need the maple at all.

  • Silken Tofu 300g
  • Semi Sweet Chocolate 100g
  • Maple Syrup *optional 2-4 Tbs
  • Peanut Butter *optional ¼- ½ cup
  1. Melt the chocolate over a double boiler or in the microwave then add all (or as many as you are using) the ingredients together into a food processor and process smooth
  2. Portion into serving cups, refrigerate to set - approx 1 -2 hours

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CBC Best Recipes Ever

Everyone loves chocolate, and what better way to indulge your sweet tooth than this decadent Chocolate Mousse? The best part is that you only need two ingredients chocolate and a liquid to mix it with &ndash coffee, wine, even water, whatever&rsquos on hand and whatever you&rsquore craving. This simple dish makes for a delectable dessert, or an afternoon snack if you can&rsquot wait until then.

Ingredients

1 cup of semi sweet chocolate, chopped
⅓ cup of water, red wine or coffee

Preparation

Heat your choice of liquid for a few minutes on the stovetop or in the microwave until simmering. Liquid must be very hot!

Place chocolate in a large mixing bowl and pour hot liquid over top, stir slightly to speed up the melting process.

Place chocolate bowl over top of a smaller bowl half filled with with ice and water. The ice water should be high enough to touch the base of the chocolate bowl. This will speed up the thickening process.

Then using an electric mixer, beat for 1 minute or until it is the texture of a thick icing. Scoop into bowls to serve. Garnish any way you like!


Genius Recipe: Two-Ingredient Chocolate Mousse


It took a brilliant, adventurous chemist to discover the simplest way to make chocolate mousse at home. "I invented it -- but it was so easy, I'm embarrassed!" Hervé This told Wired magazine in 2007.

He also invented the study of molecular gastronomy -- but his book of the same name doesn't read like a science manual. The book instead is about simple, scientific surprises and improvements in home cooking.


He explains everything from getting crisp skin on a roast chicken (don't baste with the juices) to whether gnocchi are truly done when they bob to the surface (not necessarily).


. And how to make a flawless, creamy chocolate mousse out of just chocolate and water. Oh yes he did.

It's just like whipping cream: Heavy cream froths up readily when whisked in a chilled bowl -- so all you have to do is aim for a ratio of water to fat (cocoa butter here) that mimics that of whipping cream.


Melt the chocolate and water together, cool it over an ice bath, and whisk till you have mousse. Still baffled? Watch Heston Blumenthal pull it off in the video below, which was sent to me by two different, equally excited FOOD52ers, Cade and drbabs.


Like other emulsions (vinaigrette, aioli), it works as if by magic. As you whisk, microscopic bits of water get suspended in the fat, thickening it and making it seem creamier. Then still more air is whipped into it and the cooling chocolate crystallizes around the air bubbles to make a remarkably stable foam, a.k.a. mousse.


The best thing about it -- aside from its dumb-founding magicalness -- is that it tastes like pure, unobstructed chocolate. There's no cream or egg to confuse the issue, like in normal mousses. (It also happens to be vegan, if you use dark chocolate without any added milk.)


This all happens fast as the mixture cools, so chances are you'll go too far on your first try. But if this happens, Mr. This is nonplussed - just return it to the pan, melt it, and start over. (It's even easier than saving overwhipped cream, which he's also figured out.)


Once you have the rhythm down, you can flavor it as you wish with liqueurs or coffee or spices sweeten it to your liking or just keep it dark and intense. In all of these scenarios, a little whipped cream up top is never a bad idea.

Hervé This' Chocolate Mousse

8 ounces chocolate (we used 70% bittersweet - choose a high quality chocolate you love)
3/4 cup (6 ounces) water
ice cubes
freshly whipped cream for topping (optional)

1. Simply pour water into a saucepan. Then, over medium heat, whisk in the chocolate. The result is a homogenous sauce.

2. Pour the chocolate mixture into a bowl set over an ice bath, then whisk the chocolate sauce, either manually with a whisk or with an electric mixer (if using an electric mixer, watch closely -- it will thicken faster). It will thicken and strands of chocolate will form inside the loops of the whisk. Pour or spoon immediately into ramekins, small bowls or jars and let set.

3. Note: Three things can go wrong. Here's how to fix them. If your chocolate doesn't contain enough fat, melt the mixture again, add some chocolate, and then whisk it again. If the mousse is not light enough, melt the mixture again, add some water, and whisk it once more. If you whisk it too much, so that it becomes grainy, this means that the foam has turned into an emulsion. In that case simply melt the mixture and whisk it again, adding nothing.

4. Serve immediately, or refrigerate. Top with whipped cream if desired.

Got a genius recipe to share -- from a classic cookbook, an online source, or anywhere, really? Please send it my way (and tell me what's so smart about it) at [email protected].

Photos by James Ransom

Get answers to your burning food questions on the go with our new (free!) FOOD52 Hotline iPhone app.


Genius Recipe: Two-Ingredient Chocolate Mousse

It took a brilliant, adventurous chemist to discover the simplest way to make chocolate mousse at home. “I invented it — but it was so easy, I’m embarrassed!” Herve This told Wired magazine in 2007.



He also invented the study of molecular gastronomy — but his book of the same name doesn’t read like a science manual. The book instead is about simple, scientific surprises and improvements in home cooking.

He explains everything from getting crisp skin on a roast chicken (don’t baste with the juices) to whether gnocchi are truly done when they bob to the surface (not necessarily).

… And how to make a flawless, creamy chocolate mousse out of just chocolate and water. Oh yes he did.

It’s just like whipping cream: Heavy cream froths up readily when whisked in a chilled bowl — so all you have to do is aim for a ratio of water to fat (cocoa butter here) that mimics that of whipping cream.

Melt the chocolate and water together, cool it over an ice bath, and whisk till you have mousse.

Like other emulsions (vinaigrette, aioli), it works as if by magic. As you whisk, microscopic bits of water get suspended in the fat, thickening it and making it seem creamier. Then still more air is whipped into it and the cooling chocolate crystallizes around the air bubbles to make a remarkably stable foam, a.k.a. mousse.

The best thing about it — aside from its dumb-founding magicalness — is that it tastes like pure, unobstructed chocolate. There’s no cream or egg to confuse the issue, like in normal mousses. (It also happens to be vegan, if you use dark chocolate without any added milk.)

This all happens fast as the mixture cools, so chances are you’ll go too far on your first try. But if this happens, Mr. This is nonplussed - just return it to the pan, melt it, and start over. (It’s even easier than saving overwhipped cream, which he’s also figured out.)

Once you have the rhythm down, you can flavor it as you wish with liqueurs or coffee or spices sweeten it to your liking or just keep it dark and intense. In all of these scenarios, a little whipped cream up top is never a bad idea.

Hervé This Chocolate Mousse

8 ounces chocolate (we used 70% bittersweet - choose a high quality chocolate you love)
3/4 cup (6 ounces) water
ice cubes
freshly whipped cream for topping (optional)

Simply pour water into a saucepan. Then, over medium heat, whisk in the chocolate. The result is a homogenous sauce.

Pour the chocolate mixture into a bowl set over an ice bath, then whisk the chocolate sauce, either manually with a whisk or with an electric mixer (if using an electric mixer, watch closely — it will thicken faster). It will thicken and strands of chocolate will form inside the loops of the whisk. Pour or spoon immediately into ramekins, small bowls or jars and let set.

Note: Three things can go wrong. Here’s how to fix them. If your chocolate doesn’t contain enough fat, melt the mixture again, add some chocolate, and then whisk it again. If the mousse is not light enough, melt the mixture again, add some water, and whisk it once more. If you whisk it too much, so that it becomes grainy, this means that the foam has turned into an emulsion. In that case simply melt the mixture and whisk it again, adding nothing.


Serving Chocolate Mousse for Dessert

You can portion chocolate mousse into small ramekins or even pretty cocktail glasses and then chill it before serving, which means it’s also an ideal make-ahead dessert for dinner parties. It will be set in as little as an hour, but four hours will give you nice, firm mousse, perfect for topping with more whipped cream. And while it isn’t mandatory, adding something a little crispy or crunchy to the top of chocolate mousse (think: chopped hazelnuts, crumbled toffee or brittle, even crispy breakfast cereal) really sends it over the top flavor-wise, and cements its status as the only dessert recipe you need, ever.


How To Make This Recipe

  • Make a simple ganache: A chocolate ganache is a mixture of chocolate and cream. It can be used in a variety of recipes such as chocolate truffles. In this chocolate mousse recipe, we melt the chocolate chips in the microwave. Simply add the chocolate and 2 tablespoons of cream to a microwave safe bowl. Microwave on high for about 20 seconds. Stir and let the chocolate sit for about 5 minutes, the chocolate will continue to melt. Stir until chocolate is completely melted and set aside to cool.
  • Make whipped cream: Pour the remaining cream into a medium-sized mixing bowl. Beat with an electric hand mixer or with a whisk by hand until medium peaks form. You can tell you've achieved medium peaks if you lift out the whisk and notice that the creamy peaks hold their shape with the tip of the peaks curving back toward the bowl.

  • Gently fold the cream into the chocolate: Remove about a tablespoon of the whipped cream and place it in a bowl in your refrigerator if you'd like to use it as a chocolate mousse topping. Then, fold in the whipped cream in two additions: Add half of the whipped cream into the cooled chocolate mixture with a spatula. Gently fold in the rest of the whipped cream. Folding is mixing together the ingredients without actually stirring. A flat spatula is a good tool to use when folding ingredients.
  • Pour into a small ramekin or dessert bowl, cover and chill in the refrigerator. The chocolate mousse sets in about an hour, but the longer it's in the refrigerator, the more firm the mousse becomes.

Easy Two-Ingredient Chocolate Mousse

A French confection with incorporated air bubbles to create lightness, mousse is often made by whipping egg whites or heavy cream. It can be served as filling for a cake or on its own as a decadent treat. While the texture of a mousse can be airy or veer toward the thicker, creamier side, no one can deny its richness and decadence. This is a dessert that always feels fancy!

The name "mousse" comes from the French word for "foam." ("Chocolat" is more straightforward. It just means "chocolate.") As such, the dessert of "mousse au chocolat" is literally translated as "chocolate foam." With few exceptions, chocolate mousses feature chocolate and raw egg whites — the latter ingredient being something that might make some people uncomfortable. When the egg whites are whipped into a foam and folded into melted chocolate, the result is a mouthwateringly rich yet delicate dish.

This version of chocolate mousse skips the raw eggs for those who are sensitive. With only two ingredients (plus water), you can produce a concoction that approximates sweetened whipped cream (chantilly) in taste and texture. With such sparse ingredients, you want to be sure you're using a high-quality chocolate if possible. Here, dark chocolate is heated along with sugar and water until melted. When you transfer the mixture to a bowl set atop an ice bath and whisk, you'll soon discover that it magically transforms into a smooth and creamy mousse with just enough air bubbles to create lightness.

Tips? Choose a chocolate that has at least 70 percent cocoa content. Doing so will ensure that your mousse tastes rich, chocolatey, and luxurious as opposed to just being too cloying and sweet. Be careful not to overwhip the melted chocolate so as to avoid the texture reverting to graininess. If you do end up overworking the chocolate, simply melt some again and start over.