Traditional recipes

43 Percent of Americans Remedy a Breakup With Soup, Survey Says

43 Percent of Americans Remedy a Breakup With Soup, Survey Says

After a breakup, some people turn to chocolate and others to soup

Nearly three-fourths of respondents use chicken noodle soup for comfort when they have a cold, according to the survey.

Spring isn’t just a time for cleaning the house — many choose to rethink their relationships during the first warm months as well, meaning breakup season is at its peak. It’s natural to turn to friends and family for comfort after a relationship ends, but according to a recent survey conducted by Campbell Soup Company, 43 percent of Americans turn to soup as a remedy for breakup blues.

During National Soup Month in January, Campbell’s conducted a survey asking 2,000 Americans about how they enjoy their soup.

Aside from finding out that nearly half of those surveyed find post-breakup comfort in a warm bowl of soup, the company also discovered that 23 percent of Americans turn to soup when binge-watching Netflix.

If you decide to hit the town with your friends after a breakup and indulge in one too many drinks, the next day may be more than unpleasant. According to the survey, 11 percent of Americans said they have eaten soup after a Saturday night out because they’re hungover. The trend was stronger among millennials — 21 percent said they used soup to recover.

To read about warm, comforting soup dishes to make in 30 minutes or less, click here.


When there&rsquos extra sodium in your bloodstream, it pulls water into your blood vessels, increasing the total amount (volume) of blood inside them. With more blood flowing through your blood vessels, blood pressure increases. It&rsquos like turning up the water supply to a garden hose &mdash the pressure in the hose increases as more water is blasted through it.

Over time, high blood pressure may overstretch or injure the blood vessel walls and speed the build-up of gunky plaque that can block blood flow. The added pressure tires out the heart by forcing it to work harder to pump blood through the body. And the extra water in your body can lead to bloating and weight gain.

High blood pressure is known as the &ldquosilent killer&rdquo because its symptoms are not always obvious. It&rsquos one of the major risk factors for heart disease, the No. 1 killer worldwide. Almost no one gets a free pass. Ninety percent of American adults are expected to develop high blood pressure over their lifetimes.

Did you know that sodium can affect your blood pressure even more dramatically if you&rsquore sensitive to salt? Recent science explains that certain factors may influence how your blood pressure changes when you eat salt, such as:

  • Age
  • Weight
  • Race/ethnicity
  • Gender
  • Some medical conditions (like diabetes or chronic kidney disease)

Even if you don&rsquot already have high blood pressure, eating less sodium can help blunt the rise in blood pressure that occurs with age. It can also reduce your risk of heart attack, heart failure, stroke, kidney disease, osteoporosis, stomach cancer and even headaches.


When there&rsquos extra sodium in your bloodstream, it pulls water into your blood vessels, increasing the total amount (volume) of blood inside them. With more blood flowing through your blood vessels, blood pressure increases. It&rsquos like turning up the water supply to a garden hose &mdash the pressure in the hose increases as more water is blasted through it.

Over time, high blood pressure may overstretch or injure the blood vessel walls and speed the build-up of gunky plaque that can block blood flow. The added pressure tires out the heart by forcing it to work harder to pump blood through the body. And the extra water in your body can lead to bloating and weight gain.

High blood pressure is known as the &ldquosilent killer&rdquo because its symptoms are not always obvious. It&rsquos one of the major risk factors for heart disease, the No. 1 killer worldwide. Almost no one gets a free pass. Ninety percent of American adults are expected to develop high blood pressure over their lifetimes.

Did you know that sodium can affect your blood pressure even more dramatically if you&rsquore sensitive to salt? Recent science explains that certain factors may influence how your blood pressure changes when you eat salt, such as:

  • Age
  • Weight
  • Race/ethnicity
  • Gender
  • Some medical conditions (like diabetes or chronic kidney disease)

Even if you don&rsquot already have high blood pressure, eating less sodium can help blunt the rise in blood pressure that occurs with age. It can also reduce your risk of heart attack, heart failure, stroke, kidney disease, osteoporosis, stomach cancer and even headaches.


When there&rsquos extra sodium in your bloodstream, it pulls water into your blood vessels, increasing the total amount (volume) of blood inside them. With more blood flowing through your blood vessels, blood pressure increases. It&rsquos like turning up the water supply to a garden hose &mdash the pressure in the hose increases as more water is blasted through it.

Over time, high blood pressure may overstretch or injure the blood vessel walls and speed the build-up of gunky plaque that can block blood flow. The added pressure tires out the heart by forcing it to work harder to pump blood through the body. And the extra water in your body can lead to bloating and weight gain.

High blood pressure is known as the &ldquosilent killer&rdquo because its symptoms are not always obvious. It&rsquos one of the major risk factors for heart disease, the No. 1 killer worldwide. Almost no one gets a free pass. Ninety percent of American adults are expected to develop high blood pressure over their lifetimes.

Did you know that sodium can affect your blood pressure even more dramatically if you&rsquore sensitive to salt? Recent science explains that certain factors may influence how your blood pressure changes when you eat salt, such as:

  • Age
  • Weight
  • Race/ethnicity
  • Gender
  • Some medical conditions (like diabetes or chronic kidney disease)

Even if you don&rsquot already have high blood pressure, eating less sodium can help blunt the rise in blood pressure that occurs with age. It can also reduce your risk of heart attack, heart failure, stroke, kidney disease, osteoporosis, stomach cancer and even headaches.


When there&rsquos extra sodium in your bloodstream, it pulls water into your blood vessels, increasing the total amount (volume) of blood inside them. With more blood flowing through your blood vessels, blood pressure increases. It&rsquos like turning up the water supply to a garden hose &mdash the pressure in the hose increases as more water is blasted through it.

Over time, high blood pressure may overstretch or injure the blood vessel walls and speed the build-up of gunky plaque that can block blood flow. The added pressure tires out the heart by forcing it to work harder to pump blood through the body. And the extra water in your body can lead to bloating and weight gain.

High blood pressure is known as the &ldquosilent killer&rdquo because its symptoms are not always obvious. It&rsquos one of the major risk factors for heart disease, the No. 1 killer worldwide. Almost no one gets a free pass. Ninety percent of American adults are expected to develop high blood pressure over their lifetimes.

Did you know that sodium can affect your blood pressure even more dramatically if you&rsquore sensitive to salt? Recent science explains that certain factors may influence how your blood pressure changes when you eat salt, such as:

  • Age
  • Weight
  • Race/ethnicity
  • Gender
  • Some medical conditions (like diabetes or chronic kidney disease)

Even if you don&rsquot already have high blood pressure, eating less sodium can help blunt the rise in blood pressure that occurs with age. It can also reduce your risk of heart attack, heart failure, stroke, kidney disease, osteoporosis, stomach cancer and even headaches.


When there&rsquos extra sodium in your bloodstream, it pulls water into your blood vessels, increasing the total amount (volume) of blood inside them. With more blood flowing through your blood vessels, blood pressure increases. It&rsquos like turning up the water supply to a garden hose &mdash the pressure in the hose increases as more water is blasted through it.

Over time, high blood pressure may overstretch or injure the blood vessel walls and speed the build-up of gunky plaque that can block blood flow. The added pressure tires out the heart by forcing it to work harder to pump blood through the body. And the extra water in your body can lead to bloating and weight gain.

High blood pressure is known as the &ldquosilent killer&rdquo because its symptoms are not always obvious. It&rsquos one of the major risk factors for heart disease, the No. 1 killer worldwide. Almost no one gets a free pass. Ninety percent of American adults are expected to develop high blood pressure over their lifetimes.

Did you know that sodium can affect your blood pressure even more dramatically if you&rsquore sensitive to salt? Recent science explains that certain factors may influence how your blood pressure changes when you eat salt, such as:

  • Age
  • Weight
  • Race/ethnicity
  • Gender
  • Some medical conditions (like diabetes or chronic kidney disease)

Even if you don&rsquot already have high blood pressure, eating less sodium can help blunt the rise in blood pressure that occurs with age. It can also reduce your risk of heart attack, heart failure, stroke, kidney disease, osteoporosis, stomach cancer and even headaches.


When there&rsquos extra sodium in your bloodstream, it pulls water into your blood vessels, increasing the total amount (volume) of blood inside them. With more blood flowing through your blood vessels, blood pressure increases. It&rsquos like turning up the water supply to a garden hose &mdash the pressure in the hose increases as more water is blasted through it.

Over time, high blood pressure may overstretch or injure the blood vessel walls and speed the build-up of gunky plaque that can block blood flow. The added pressure tires out the heart by forcing it to work harder to pump blood through the body. And the extra water in your body can lead to bloating and weight gain.

High blood pressure is known as the &ldquosilent killer&rdquo because its symptoms are not always obvious. It&rsquos one of the major risk factors for heart disease, the No. 1 killer worldwide. Almost no one gets a free pass. Ninety percent of American adults are expected to develop high blood pressure over their lifetimes.

Did you know that sodium can affect your blood pressure even more dramatically if you&rsquore sensitive to salt? Recent science explains that certain factors may influence how your blood pressure changes when you eat salt, such as:

  • Age
  • Weight
  • Race/ethnicity
  • Gender
  • Some medical conditions (like diabetes or chronic kidney disease)

Even if you don&rsquot already have high blood pressure, eating less sodium can help blunt the rise in blood pressure that occurs with age. It can also reduce your risk of heart attack, heart failure, stroke, kidney disease, osteoporosis, stomach cancer and even headaches.


When there&rsquos extra sodium in your bloodstream, it pulls water into your blood vessels, increasing the total amount (volume) of blood inside them. With more blood flowing through your blood vessels, blood pressure increases. It&rsquos like turning up the water supply to a garden hose &mdash the pressure in the hose increases as more water is blasted through it.

Over time, high blood pressure may overstretch or injure the blood vessel walls and speed the build-up of gunky plaque that can block blood flow. The added pressure tires out the heart by forcing it to work harder to pump blood through the body. And the extra water in your body can lead to bloating and weight gain.

High blood pressure is known as the &ldquosilent killer&rdquo because its symptoms are not always obvious. It&rsquos one of the major risk factors for heart disease, the No. 1 killer worldwide. Almost no one gets a free pass. Ninety percent of American adults are expected to develop high blood pressure over their lifetimes.

Did you know that sodium can affect your blood pressure even more dramatically if you&rsquore sensitive to salt? Recent science explains that certain factors may influence how your blood pressure changes when you eat salt, such as:

  • Age
  • Weight
  • Race/ethnicity
  • Gender
  • Some medical conditions (like diabetes or chronic kidney disease)

Even if you don&rsquot already have high blood pressure, eating less sodium can help blunt the rise in blood pressure that occurs with age. It can also reduce your risk of heart attack, heart failure, stroke, kidney disease, osteoporosis, stomach cancer and even headaches.


When there&rsquos extra sodium in your bloodstream, it pulls water into your blood vessels, increasing the total amount (volume) of blood inside them. With more blood flowing through your blood vessels, blood pressure increases. It&rsquos like turning up the water supply to a garden hose &mdash the pressure in the hose increases as more water is blasted through it.

Over time, high blood pressure may overstretch or injure the blood vessel walls and speed the build-up of gunky plaque that can block blood flow. The added pressure tires out the heart by forcing it to work harder to pump blood through the body. And the extra water in your body can lead to bloating and weight gain.

High blood pressure is known as the &ldquosilent killer&rdquo because its symptoms are not always obvious. It&rsquos one of the major risk factors for heart disease, the No. 1 killer worldwide. Almost no one gets a free pass. Ninety percent of American adults are expected to develop high blood pressure over their lifetimes.

Did you know that sodium can affect your blood pressure even more dramatically if you&rsquore sensitive to salt? Recent science explains that certain factors may influence how your blood pressure changes when you eat salt, such as:

  • Age
  • Weight
  • Race/ethnicity
  • Gender
  • Some medical conditions (like diabetes or chronic kidney disease)

Even if you don&rsquot already have high blood pressure, eating less sodium can help blunt the rise in blood pressure that occurs with age. It can also reduce your risk of heart attack, heart failure, stroke, kidney disease, osteoporosis, stomach cancer and even headaches.


When there&rsquos extra sodium in your bloodstream, it pulls water into your blood vessels, increasing the total amount (volume) of blood inside them. With more blood flowing through your blood vessels, blood pressure increases. It&rsquos like turning up the water supply to a garden hose &mdash the pressure in the hose increases as more water is blasted through it.

Over time, high blood pressure may overstretch or injure the blood vessel walls and speed the build-up of gunky plaque that can block blood flow. The added pressure tires out the heart by forcing it to work harder to pump blood through the body. And the extra water in your body can lead to bloating and weight gain.

High blood pressure is known as the &ldquosilent killer&rdquo because its symptoms are not always obvious. It&rsquos one of the major risk factors for heart disease, the No. 1 killer worldwide. Almost no one gets a free pass. Ninety percent of American adults are expected to develop high blood pressure over their lifetimes.

Did you know that sodium can affect your blood pressure even more dramatically if you&rsquore sensitive to salt? Recent science explains that certain factors may influence how your blood pressure changes when you eat salt, such as:

  • Age
  • Weight
  • Race/ethnicity
  • Gender
  • Some medical conditions (like diabetes or chronic kidney disease)

Even if you don&rsquot already have high blood pressure, eating less sodium can help blunt the rise in blood pressure that occurs with age. It can also reduce your risk of heart attack, heart failure, stroke, kidney disease, osteoporosis, stomach cancer and even headaches.


When there&rsquos extra sodium in your bloodstream, it pulls water into your blood vessels, increasing the total amount (volume) of blood inside them. With more blood flowing through your blood vessels, blood pressure increases. It&rsquos like turning up the water supply to a garden hose &mdash the pressure in the hose increases as more water is blasted through it.

Over time, high blood pressure may overstretch or injure the blood vessel walls and speed the build-up of gunky plaque that can block blood flow. The added pressure tires out the heart by forcing it to work harder to pump blood through the body. And the extra water in your body can lead to bloating and weight gain.

High blood pressure is known as the &ldquosilent killer&rdquo because its symptoms are not always obvious. It&rsquos one of the major risk factors for heart disease, the No. 1 killer worldwide. Almost no one gets a free pass. Ninety percent of American adults are expected to develop high blood pressure over their lifetimes.

Did you know that sodium can affect your blood pressure even more dramatically if you&rsquore sensitive to salt? Recent science explains that certain factors may influence how your blood pressure changes when you eat salt, such as:

  • Age
  • Weight
  • Race/ethnicity
  • Gender
  • Some medical conditions (like diabetes or chronic kidney disease)

Even if you don&rsquot already have high blood pressure, eating less sodium can help blunt the rise in blood pressure that occurs with age. It can also reduce your risk of heart attack, heart failure, stroke, kidney disease, osteoporosis, stomach cancer and even headaches.


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