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Sushi Burgers Are the Latest Trend in Food Mashups

Sushi Burgers Are the Latest Trend in Food Mashups


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Sushi ingredients smacked between two ‘buns’ made of sticky rice and sesame seeds is the latest Instagram food trend

With sushi burgers, you’ll never have to worry about your order coming out too well-done.

Sushi in roll form just doesn’t cut it these days.First, we were inundated with the sushi burrito trend, and now the sushi burger is the latest trending twist on this Japanese classic.

The sushi burger looks like a sandwich, but is actually sushi ingredients smashed between two “buns” made of sticky rice and dripping with wasabi mayo, avocado, and ginger.

Sushi burgers have been trending on Instagram, and with good reason. As you can see, they make for an unapologetically photogenic plate of food:

The ingredients pictured are typically sashimi, avocado, wasabi, aïoli, and even chicken or beef. The trend was first introduced by vegan food blogger Sam of “So Beautifully Raw,” who posted the first image last week, and it has since gone viral.


These Will Be the 21 Biggest Food Trends of 2021, According to Chefs

Comfort food, condiments, and a joyful, over-the-top return to indoor dining.

Late last year, we talked to dozens of chefs who predicted trends that ranged from family-style dining to tasting menus with non-alcoholic juice pairings. Of course, no one could have predicted the way 2020 played outthough San Francisco chef Angela Pinkerton did anticipate we𠆝 be eating more bread.

As we close out a year that’s brought upheaval and devastation to an industry we love so much, we revisited the conversation to try to imagine, with a little more humility, what next year might bring. Below, chefs weigh in on the biggest restaurant trends they predict to find in a post-COVID-19 world.

Special occasion dining

“When we do dine in, it will be memorable. More exclusive types of dining experiences in the dining room—think tasting menus, private dining experiences that go above and beyond with ingredients and access. People will go out for a truly memorable dining experience where they feel safe and can expect an experience unlike anything they’ve had before.”— JoJo Ruiz, executive chef at Serea Coastal Cuisine and Lionfish in San Diego

"With all the cooking at home going on during the COVID-19 pandemic, dining out is starting to feel super special occasion again—tasting menus with wine pairings are a fun step in the opposite direction." — Cassidee Dabney, executive chef of The Barn at Blackberry Farm in Tennessee

“In response to all that has happened this year, I believe next year will bring two polarizing approaches to dining. One that embraces the need for simpler, comforting and soul-nourishing cuisine and the other that functions as an escape and embraces frivolousness𠅊llowing patrons to be both fancy and indulgent.” — Gemma Kamin-Korn, chef of Bar Beau in Williamsburg, New York

Deeper dives into Black foodways

“I believe that folks are taking more interest in the African diaspora and specifically what African-American foodways are in the scope of the American culinary market. I think we&aposll see a more focused conversation around ingredients like sweet potatoes and various greens or biscuits as they relate to Black folks and more specifically how they come from our agricultural and more agrarian roots. Families like the਌onyersꃺmily in Manning, South Carolina, growing heritage sweet potatoes come to mind, or Theꃊrter family of Philadelphia who have been growing watermelons and selling them on the corner of 84th and Lindbergh in Southwest Philadelphia for 50 years. Cybille and I served those very melons for the Black Labor Day pop up that we did on September 8th. I also think that there will be a rekindling under the fire of indigenous cuisines in America. Trends will be less "trendy" this year and more rooted as we look back on a year that has grounded many of us and brought our foundations and truths to the surface, in my opinion.” — Omar Tate, chef and founder of Honeysuckle Projects in Philadelphia

“I think the current state of the industry leaves the door wide open for more diverse voices and cultures from within the African Diaspora to thrive. We’ll see a lot more folks embracing the cultures that either aren’t often lauded in the mainstream or those that aren’t too concerned with the aesthetics of &aposperfect plating&apos and pretension. Instead, properly centered narratives and stories celebrating the roots, histories, and traditions of these cultures such as the cuisine of Haiti or that of the Fulani people will get the reverence they deserve. As a result of this I also think there’ll be an even stronger push in specialty products from these cultures being packaged and more readily available for anyone willing to experiment. Perhaps a small batch Haitian Epis might catch your eye on a grocery store shelf, or you might even purchase a specially crafted Yaji spice from an online vendor. Either way, we’ll certainly find more ways to celebrate and support the chefs and artisans dedicating their talents towards bringing more awareness and assertive acclaim to these cultures.” — Cybille St.Aude-Tate, chef of Earthseed Provisionsਊnd Honeysuckle Projects in Philadelphia

Individualized tasting menus

𠇊s diners feel more and more comfortable going out, the same old menus just won&apost cut it anymore. Dining out will really become something sought out for a unique experience. They want something created just for them, making it truly a reason to get out of the house and celebrate.” — Mariah Posadni, pastry chef of Common House Richmond in Virginia

“Small-group private dining will be hot. Restaurants that can provide safe, intimate spaces for small groups will be sought out at a premium.” — Ravi Kapur, chef and owner of Liholiho Yacht Clubਊnd򠷪r Inga in San Francisco

Heritage cooking

"I’m glad heritage cooking is trending, but it should be a trend that is here to stay. We (first-generation American chefs, immigrant chefs) didn’t &aposshow up&apos overnight and start cooking. The rise in recognition for immigrant cooking and heritage recipes has been a long time coming, and to be able to cook their families&apos food and to be showcased properly for it, is something first generation American chefs and immigrant chefs can celebrate. It’s high time these talented cooks get the spotlight they deserve and the spotlight on their cultures those vibrant cultures deserve. Overall, in the New Year, I expect people will start seeing cultures more holistically through food (e.g., Vietnamese food beyond banh mi and pho). When it comes to exposing diners to the new traditions—what it means to be Burmese-American, Filipino-American, Ethiopian-American, or Vietnamese-American—I look up to what chefs including Charles Phan, Tom Cunanan, and Andrea Nguyen have done for Filipino and Vietnamese chefs. They’ve opened a door to us being better represented this year and for the years to come." — Kevin Tien, chef of Moon Rabbit in Washington, DC

At-home restaurant experiences

“This year we, and many other restaurants across the globe, had to quickly pivot to expand into takeout and delivery, and I don&apost see that trend going away anytime soon. In 2021, it will evolve as chefs are creating new and interesting ways to bring the restaurant experience to life at home for guests. At our restaurants, paella became one of the most popular items on our to-go menu. The paella pan fit perfectly into a pizza box, while keeping the rice hot, so you had this element of presentation you&aposd get in the restaurant.” — Rick Billings, executive chef of José Andrés ThinkFoodGroup

"Restaurant-style meals packaged for the family will definitely keep trending in the year to come. Plant-based, healthy vegetarian dishes with seasonal ingredients and global flavor are here to stay in the future. Wonderfully curated meals with soul, taste, and creativity can be picked up at a favorite restaurant and ready on the table in a split second."  — Daniel Boulud, chef of Daniel, in New York City

𠇌hefs and restaurant owners will find a way to safely provide cool experiences in customers&apos homes. Some creative take-away options will emerge, and I’m hopeful that some risk-taking and more challenging concepts will trickle out towards the end of the year." — Evan Gaudreau, chef and owner of Post House in Charleston

“The biggest trend next year is going to (continue to) be how to be creative with to-go food. I think as much as I can about what I can do to make to-go dining more attractive to diners, whether it’s what we’re using for flatware and silverware or what we can do to appeal to a family for weeknight dinner, or a special &aposdate night&apos in.” — JoJo Ruiz

“It’s probably no surprise this year’s biggest trend (and likely next year’s as well) was to-go. Restaurants across the country, including fine-dining restaurants that rely heavily on presentation and overall experience, are having to pivot to provide these fantastic meals in guests’ homes. I don’t see this changing as we enter 2021.” — Gavin Fine, owner of Fine Dining Restaurant Group (opening a new concept in spring 2021 at The Cloudveil) in Jackson Hole, Wyoming

“In response to guests looking for more privatized experiences, we&aposre transforming our carryout options to include more whimsical and casual dishes that guests can enjoy at their leisure and in a place of their choosing.” — Chris Huerta, executive chef of Old Edwards Hospitality Group in Franklin, North Carolina

More virtual cooking classes

"Online, chef-driven virtual cooking classes—with accompanying chef food boxes for their recipes—will continue to expand in 2021. Many people will keep this fun way to get together with friends and family and be entertained at home while preparing a good meal and cooking along with a chef."— Daniel Boulud


These Will Be the 21 Biggest Food Trends of 2021, According to Chefs

Comfort food, condiments, and a joyful, over-the-top return to indoor dining.

Late last year, we talked to dozens of chefs who predicted trends that ranged from family-style dining to tasting menus with non-alcoholic juice pairings. Of course, no one could have predicted the way 2020 played outthough San Francisco chef Angela Pinkerton did anticipate we𠆝 be eating more bread.

As we close out a year that’s brought upheaval and devastation to an industry we love so much, we revisited the conversation to try to imagine, with a little more humility, what next year might bring. Below, chefs weigh in on the biggest restaurant trends they predict to find in a post-COVID-19 world.

Special occasion dining

“When we do dine in, it will be memorable. More exclusive types of dining experiences in the dining room—think tasting menus, private dining experiences that go above and beyond with ingredients and access. People will go out for a truly memorable dining experience where they feel safe and can expect an experience unlike anything they’ve had before.”— JoJo Ruiz, executive chef at Serea Coastal Cuisine and Lionfish in San Diego

"With all the cooking at home going on during the COVID-19 pandemic, dining out is starting to feel super special occasion again—tasting menus with wine pairings are a fun step in the opposite direction." — Cassidee Dabney, executive chef of The Barn at Blackberry Farm in Tennessee

“In response to all that has happened this year, I believe next year will bring two polarizing approaches to dining. One that embraces the need for simpler, comforting and soul-nourishing cuisine and the other that functions as an escape and embraces frivolousness𠅊llowing patrons to be both fancy and indulgent.” — Gemma Kamin-Korn, chef of Bar Beau in Williamsburg, New York

Deeper dives into Black foodways

“I believe that folks are taking more interest in the African diaspora and specifically what African-American foodways are in the scope of the American culinary market. I think we&aposll see a more focused conversation around ingredients like sweet potatoes and various greens or biscuits as they relate to Black folks and more specifically how they come from our agricultural and more agrarian roots. Families like the਌onyersꃺmily in Manning, South Carolina, growing heritage sweet potatoes come to mind, or Theꃊrter family of Philadelphia who have been growing watermelons and selling them on the corner of 84th and Lindbergh in Southwest Philadelphia for 50 years. Cybille and I served those very melons for the Black Labor Day pop up that we did on September 8th. I also think that there will be a rekindling under the fire of indigenous cuisines in America. Trends will be less "trendy" this year and more rooted as we look back on a year that has grounded many of us and brought our foundations and truths to the surface, in my opinion.” — Omar Tate, chef and founder of Honeysuckle Projects in Philadelphia

“I think the current state of the industry leaves the door wide open for more diverse voices and cultures from within the African Diaspora to thrive. We’ll see a lot more folks embracing the cultures that either aren’t often lauded in the mainstream or those that aren’t too concerned with the aesthetics of &aposperfect plating&apos and pretension. Instead, properly centered narratives and stories celebrating the roots, histories, and traditions of these cultures such as the cuisine of Haiti or that of the Fulani people will get the reverence they deserve. As a result of this I also think there’ll be an even stronger push in specialty products from these cultures being packaged and more readily available for anyone willing to experiment. Perhaps a small batch Haitian Epis might catch your eye on a grocery store shelf, or you might even purchase a specially crafted Yaji spice from an online vendor. Either way, we’ll certainly find more ways to celebrate and support the chefs and artisans dedicating their talents towards bringing more awareness and assertive acclaim to these cultures.” — Cybille St.Aude-Tate, chef of Earthseed Provisionsਊnd Honeysuckle Projects in Philadelphia

Individualized tasting menus

𠇊s diners feel more and more comfortable going out, the same old menus just won&apost cut it anymore. Dining out will really become something sought out for a unique experience. They want something created just for them, making it truly a reason to get out of the house and celebrate.” — Mariah Posadni, pastry chef of Common House Richmond in Virginia

“Small-group private dining will be hot. Restaurants that can provide safe, intimate spaces for small groups will be sought out at a premium.” — Ravi Kapur, chef and owner of Liholiho Yacht Clubਊnd򠷪r Inga in San Francisco

Heritage cooking

"I’m glad heritage cooking is trending, but it should be a trend that is here to stay. We (first-generation American chefs, immigrant chefs) didn’t &aposshow up&apos overnight and start cooking. The rise in recognition for immigrant cooking and heritage recipes has been a long time coming, and to be able to cook their families&apos food and to be showcased properly for it, is something first generation American chefs and immigrant chefs can celebrate. It’s high time these talented cooks get the spotlight they deserve and the spotlight on their cultures those vibrant cultures deserve. Overall, in the New Year, I expect people will start seeing cultures more holistically through food (e.g., Vietnamese food beyond banh mi and pho). When it comes to exposing diners to the new traditions—what it means to be Burmese-American, Filipino-American, Ethiopian-American, or Vietnamese-American—I look up to what chefs including Charles Phan, Tom Cunanan, and Andrea Nguyen have done for Filipino and Vietnamese chefs. They’ve opened a door to us being better represented this year and for the years to come." — Kevin Tien, chef of Moon Rabbit in Washington, DC

At-home restaurant experiences

“This year we, and many other restaurants across the globe, had to quickly pivot to expand into takeout and delivery, and I don&apost see that trend going away anytime soon. In 2021, it will evolve as chefs are creating new and interesting ways to bring the restaurant experience to life at home for guests. At our restaurants, paella became one of the most popular items on our to-go menu. The paella pan fit perfectly into a pizza box, while keeping the rice hot, so you had this element of presentation you&aposd get in the restaurant.” — Rick Billings, executive chef of José Andrés ThinkFoodGroup

"Restaurant-style meals packaged for the family will definitely keep trending in the year to come. Plant-based, healthy vegetarian dishes with seasonal ingredients and global flavor are here to stay in the future. Wonderfully curated meals with soul, taste, and creativity can be picked up at a favorite restaurant and ready on the table in a split second."  — Daniel Boulud, chef of Daniel, in New York City

𠇌hefs and restaurant owners will find a way to safely provide cool experiences in customers&apos homes. Some creative take-away options will emerge, and I’m hopeful that some risk-taking and more challenging concepts will trickle out towards the end of the year." — Evan Gaudreau, chef and owner of Post House in Charleston

“The biggest trend next year is going to (continue to) be how to be creative with to-go food. I think as much as I can about what I can do to make to-go dining more attractive to diners, whether it’s what we’re using for flatware and silverware or what we can do to appeal to a family for weeknight dinner, or a special &aposdate night&apos in.” — JoJo Ruiz

“It’s probably no surprise this year’s biggest trend (and likely next year’s as well) was to-go. Restaurants across the country, including fine-dining restaurants that rely heavily on presentation and overall experience, are having to pivot to provide these fantastic meals in guests’ homes. I don’t see this changing as we enter 2021.” — Gavin Fine, owner of Fine Dining Restaurant Group (opening a new concept in spring 2021 at The Cloudveil) in Jackson Hole, Wyoming

“In response to guests looking for more privatized experiences, we&aposre transforming our carryout options to include more whimsical and casual dishes that guests can enjoy at their leisure and in a place of their choosing.” — Chris Huerta, executive chef of Old Edwards Hospitality Group in Franklin, North Carolina

More virtual cooking classes

"Online, chef-driven virtual cooking classes—with accompanying chef food boxes for their recipes—will continue to expand in 2021. Many people will keep this fun way to get together with friends and family and be entertained at home while preparing a good meal and cooking along with a chef."— Daniel Boulud


These Will Be the 21 Biggest Food Trends of 2021, According to Chefs

Comfort food, condiments, and a joyful, over-the-top return to indoor dining.

Late last year, we talked to dozens of chefs who predicted trends that ranged from family-style dining to tasting menus with non-alcoholic juice pairings. Of course, no one could have predicted the way 2020 played outthough San Francisco chef Angela Pinkerton did anticipate we𠆝 be eating more bread.

As we close out a year that’s brought upheaval and devastation to an industry we love so much, we revisited the conversation to try to imagine, with a little more humility, what next year might bring. Below, chefs weigh in on the biggest restaurant trends they predict to find in a post-COVID-19 world.

Special occasion dining

“When we do dine in, it will be memorable. More exclusive types of dining experiences in the dining room—think tasting menus, private dining experiences that go above and beyond with ingredients and access. People will go out for a truly memorable dining experience where they feel safe and can expect an experience unlike anything they’ve had before.”— JoJo Ruiz, executive chef at Serea Coastal Cuisine and Lionfish in San Diego

"With all the cooking at home going on during the COVID-19 pandemic, dining out is starting to feel super special occasion again—tasting menus with wine pairings are a fun step in the opposite direction." — Cassidee Dabney, executive chef of The Barn at Blackberry Farm in Tennessee

“In response to all that has happened this year, I believe next year will bring two polarizing approaches to dining. One that embraces the need for simpler, comforting and soul-nourishing cuisine and the other that functions as an escape and embraces frivolousness𠅊llowing patrons to be both fancy and indulgent.” — Gemma Kamin-Korn, chef of Bar Beau in Williamsburg, New York

Deeper dives into Black foodways

“I believe that folks are taking more interest in the African diaspora and specifically what African-American foodways are in the scope of the American culinary market. I think we&aposll see a more focused conversation around ingredients like sweet potatoes and various greens or biscuits as they relate to Black folks and more specifically how they come from our agricultural and more agrarian roots. Families like the਌onyersꃺmily in Manning, South Carolina, growing heritage sweet potatoes come to mind, or Theꃊrter family of Philadelphia who have been growing watermelons and selling them on the corner of 84th and Lindbergh in Southwest Philadelphia for 50 years. Cybille and I served those very melons for the Black Labor Day pop up that we did on September 8th. I also think that there will be a rekindling under the fire of indigenous cuisines in America. Trends will be less "trendy" this year and more rooted as we look back on a year that has grounded many of us and brought our foundations and truths to the surface, in my opinion.” — Omar Tate, chef and founder of Honeysuckle Projects in Philadelphia

“I think the current state of the industry leaves the door wide open for more diverse voices and cultures from within the African Diaspora to thrive. We’ll see a lot more folks embracing the cultures that either aren’t often lauded in the mainstream or those that aren’t too concerned with the aesthetics of &aposperfect plating&apos and pretension. Instead, properly centered narratives and stories celebrating the roots, histories, and traditions of these cultures such as the cuisine of Haiti or that of the Fulani people will get the reverence they deserve. As a result of this I also think there’ll be an even stronger push in specialty products from these cultures being packaged and more readily available for anyone willing to experiment. Perhaps a small batch Haitian Epis might catch your eye on a grocery store shelf, or you might even purchase a specially crafted Yaji spice from an online vendor. Either way, we’ll certainly find more ways to celebrate and support the chefs and artisans dedicating their talents towards bringing more awareness and assertive acclaim to these cultures.” — Cybille St.Aude-Tate, chef of Earthseed Provisionsਊnd Honeysuckle Projects in Philadelphia

Individualized tasting menus

𠇊s diners feel more and more comfortable going out, the same old menus just won&apost cut it anymore. Dining out will really become something sought out for a unique experience. They want something created just for them, making it truly a reason to get out of the house and celebrate.” — Mariah Posadni, pastry chef of Common House Richmond in Virginia

“Small-group private dining will be hot. Restaurants that can provide safe, intimate spaces for small groups will be sought out at a premium.” — Ravi Kapur, chef and owner of Liholiho Yacht Clubਊnd򠷪r Inga in San Francisco

Heritage cooking

"I’m glad heritage cooking is trending, but it should be a trend that is here to stay. We (first-generation American chefs, immigrant chefs) didn’t &aposshow up&apos overnight and start cooking. The rise in recognition for immigrant cooking and heritage recipes has been a long time coming, and to be able to cook their families&apos food and to be showcased properly for it, is something first generation American chefs and immigrant chefs can celebrate. It’s high time these talented cooks get the spotlight they deserve and the spotlight on their cultures those vibrant cultures deserve. Overall, in the New Year, I expect people will start seeing cultures more holistically through food (e.g., Vietnamese food beyond banh mi and pho). When it comes to exposing diners to the new traditions—what it means to be Burmese-American, Filipino-American, Ethiopian-American, or Vietnamese-American—I look up to what chefs including Charles Phan, Tom Cunanan, and Andrea Nguyen have done for Filipino and Vietnamese chefs. They’ve opened a door to us being better represented this year and for the years to come." — Kevin Tien, chef of Moon Rabbit in Washington, DC

At-home restaurant experiences

“This year we, and many other restaurants across the globe, had to quickly pivot to expand into takeout and delivery, and I don&apost see that trend going away anytime soon. In 2021, it will evolve as chefs are creating new and interesting ways to bring the restaurant experience to life at home for guests. At our restaurants, paella became one of the most popular items on our to-go menu. The paella pan fit perfectly into a pizza box, while keeping the rice hot, so you had this element of presentation you&aposd get in the restaurant.” — Rick Billings, executive chef of José Andrés ThinkFoodGroup

"Restaurant-style meals packaged for the family will definitely keep trending in the year to come. Plant-based, healthy vegetarian dishes with seasonal ingredients and global flavor are here to stay in the future. Wonderfully curated meals with soul, taste, and creativity can be picked up at a favorite restaurant and ready on the table in a split second."  — Daniel Boulud, chef of Daniel, in New York City

𠇌hefs and restaurant owners will find a way to safely provide cool experiences in customers&apos homes. Some creative take-away options will emerge, and I’m hopeful that some risk-taking and more challenging concepts will trickle out towards the end of the year." — Evan Gaudreau, chef and owner of Post House in Charleston

“The biggest trend next year is going to (continue to) be how to be creative with to-go food. I think as much as I can about what I can do to make to-go dining more attractive to diners, whether it’s what we’re using for flatware and silverware or what we can do to appeal to a family for weeknight dinner, or a special &aposdate night&apos in.” — JoJo Ruiz

“It’s probably no surprise this year’s biggest trend (and likely next year’s as well) was to-go. Restaurants across the country, including fine-dining restaurants that rely heavily on presentation and overall experience, are having to pivot to provide these fantastic meals in guests’ homes. I don’t see this changing as we enter 2021.” — Gavin Fine, owner of Fine Dining Restaurant Group (opening a new concept in spring 2021 at The Cloudveil) in Jackson Hole, Wyoming

“In response to guests looking for more privatized experiences, we&aposre transforming our carryout options to include more whimsical and casual dishes that guests can enjoy at their leisure and in a place of their choosing.” — Chris Huerta, executive chef of Old Edwards Hospitality Group in Franklin, North Carolina

More virtual cooking classes

"Online, chef-driven virtual cooking classes—with accompanying chef food boxes for their recipes—will continue to expand in 2021. Many people will keep this fun way to get together with friends and family and be entertained at home while preparing a good meal and cooking along with a chef."— Daniel Boulud


These Will Be the 21 Biggest Food Trends of 2021, According to Chefs

Comfort food, condiments, and a joyful, over-the-top return to indoor dining.

Late last year, we talked to dozens of chefs who predicted trends that ranged from family-style dining to tasting menus with non-alcoholic juice pairings. Of course, no one could have predicted the way 2020 played outthough San Francisco chef Angela Pinkerton did anticipate we𠆝 be eating more bread.

As we close out a year that’s brought upheaval and devastation to an industry we love so much, we revisited the conversation to try to imagine, with a little more humility, what next year might bring. Below, chefs weigh in on the biggest restaurant trends they predict to find in a post-COVID-19 world.

Special occasion dining

“When we do dine in, it will be memorable. More exclusive types of dining experiences in the dining room—think tasting menus, private dining experiences that go above and beyond with ingredients and access. People will go out for a truly memorable dining experience where they feel safe and can expect an experience unlike anything they’ve had before.”— JoJo Ruiz, executive chef at Serea Coastal Cuisine and Lionfish in San Diego

"With all the cooking at home going on during the COVID-19 pandemic, dining out is starting to feel super special occasion again—tasting menus with wine pairings are a fun step in the opposite direction." — Cassidee Dabney, executive chef of The Barn at Blackberry Farm in Tennessee

“In response to all that has happened this year, I believe next year will bring two polarizing approaches to dining. One that embraces the need for simpler, comforting and soul-nourishing cuisine and the other that functions as an escape and embraces frivolousness𠅊llowing patrons to be both fancy and indulgent.” — Gemma Kamin-Korn, chef of Bar Beau in Williamsburg, New York

Deeper dives into Black foodways

“I believe that folks are taking more interest in the African diaspora and specifically what African-American foodways are in the scope of the American culinary market. I think we&aposll see a more focused conversation around ingredients like sweet potatoes and various greens or biscuits as they relate to Black folks and more specifically how they come from our agricultural and more agrarian roots. Families like the਌onyersꃺmily in Manning, South Carolina, growing heritage sweet potatoes come to mind, or Theꃊrter family of Philadelphia who have been growing watermelons and selling them on the corner of 84th and Lindbergh in Southwest Philadelphia for 50 years. Cybille and I served those very melons for the Black Labor Day pop up that we did on September 8th. I also think that there will be a rekindling under the fire of indigenous cuisines in America. Trends will be less "trendy" this year and more rooted as we look back on a year that has grounded many of us and brought our foundations and truths to the surface, in my opinion.” — Omar Tate, chef and founder of Honeysuckle Projects in Philadelphia

“I think the current state of the industry leaves the door wide open for more diverse voices and cultures from within the African Diaspora to thrive. We’ll see a lot more folks embracing the cultures that either aren’t often lauded in the mainstream or those that aren’t too concerned with the aesthetics of &aposperfect plating&apos and pretension. Instead, properly centered narratives and stories celebrating the roots, histories, and traditions of these cultures such as the cuisine of Haiti or that of the Fulani people will get the reverence they deserve. As a result of this I also think there’ll be an even stronger push in specialty products from these cultures being packaged and more readily available for anyone willing to experiment. Perhaps a small batch Haitian Epis might catch your eye on a grocery store shelf, or you might even purchase a specially crafted Yaji spice from an online vendor. Either way, we’ll certainly find more ways to celebrate and support the chefs and artisans dedicating their talents towards bringing more awareness and assertive acclaim to these cultures.” — Cybille St.Aude-Tate, chef of Earthseed Provisionsਊnd Honeysuckle Projects in Philadelphia

Individualized tasting menus

𠇊s diners feel more and more comfortable going out, the same old menus just won&apost cut it anymore. Dining out will really become something sought out for a unique experience. They want something created just for them, making it truly a reason to get out of the house and celebrate.” — Mariah Posadni, pastry chef of Common House Richmond in Virginia

“Small-group private dining will be hot. Restaurants that can provide safe, intimate spaces for small groups will be sought out at a premium.” — Ravi Kapur, chef and owner of Liholiho Yacht Clubਊnd򠷪r Inga in San Francisco

Heritage cooking

"I’m glad heritage cooking is trending, but it should be a trend that is here to stay. We (first-generation American chefs, immigrant chefs) didn’t &aposshow up&apos overnight and start cooking. The rise in recognition for immigrant cooking and heritage recipes has been a long time coming, and to be able to cook their families&apos food and to be showcased properly for it, is something first generation American chefs and immigrant chefs can celebrate. It’s high time these talented cooks get the spotlight they deserve and the spotlight on their cultures those vibrant cultures deserve. Overall, in the New Year, I expect people will start seeing cultures more holistically through food (e.g., Vietnamese food beyond banh mi and pho). When it comes to exposing diners to the new traditions—what it means to be Burmese-American, Filipino-American, Ethiopian-American, or Vietnamese-American—I look up to what chefs including Charles Phan, Tom Cunanan, and Andrea Nguyen have done for Filipino and Vietnamese chefs. They’ve opened a door to us being better represented this year and for the years to come." — Kevin Tien, chef of Moon Rabbit in Washington, DC

At-home restaurant experiences

“This year we, and many other restaurants across the globe, had to quickly pivot to expand into takeout and delivery, and I don&apost see that trend going away anytime soon. In 2021, it will evolve as chefs are creating new and interesting ways to bring the restaurant experience to life at home for guests. At our restaurants, paella became one of the most popular items on our to-go menu. The paella pan fit perfectly into a pizza box, while keeping the rice hot, so you had this element of presentation you&aposd get in the restaurant.” — Rick Billings, executive chef of José Andrés ThinkFoodGroup

"Restaurant-style meals packaged for the family will definitely keep trending in the year to come. Plant-based, healthy vegetarian dishes with seasonal ingredients and global flavor are here to stay in the future. Wonderfully curated meals with soul, taste, and creativity can be picked up at a favorite restaurant and ready on the table in a split second."  — Daniel Boulud, chef of Daniel, in New York City

𠇌hefs and restaurant owners will find a way to safely provide cool experiences in customers&apos homes. Some creative take-away options will emerge, and I’m hopeful that some risk-taking and more challenging concepts will trickle out towards the end of the year." — Evan Gaudreau, chef and owner of Post House in Charleston

“The biggest trend next year is going to (continue to) be how to be creative with to-go food. I think as much as I can about what I can do to make to-go dining more attractive to diners, whether it’s what we’re using for flatware and silverware or what we can do to appeal to a family for weeknight dinner, or a special &aposdate night&apos in.” — JoJo Ruiz

“It’s probably no surprise this year’s biggest trend (and likely next year’s as well) was to-go. Restaurants across the country, including fine-dining restaurants that rely heavily on presentation and overall experience, are having to pivot to provide these fantastic meals in guests’ homes. I don’t see this changing as we enter 2021.” — Gavin Fine, owner of Fine Dining Restaurant Group (opening a new concept in spring 2021 at The Cloudveil) in Jackson Hole, Wyoming

“In response to guests looking for more privatized experiences, we&aposre transforming our carryout options to include more whimsical and casual dishes that guests can enjoy at their leisure and in a place of their choosing.” — Chris Huerta, executive chef of Old Edwards Hospitality Group in Franklin, North Carolina

More virtual cooking classes

"Online, chef-driven virtual cooking classes—with accompanying chef food boxes for their recipes—will continue to expand in 2021. Many people will keep this fun way to get together with friends and family and be entertained at home while preparing a good meal and cooking along with a chef."— Daniel Boulud


These Will Be the 21 Biggest Food Trends of 2021, According to Chefs

Comfort food, condiments, and a joyful, over-the-top return to indoor dining.

Late last year, we talked to dozens of chefs who predicted trends that ranged from family-style dining to tasting menus with non-alcoholic juice pairings. Of course, no one could have predicted the way 2020 played outthough San Francisco chef Angela Pinkerton did anticipate we𠆝 be eating more bread.

As we close out a year that’s brought upheaval and devastation to an industry we love so much, we revisited the conversation to try to imagine, with a little more humility, what next year might bring. Below, chefs weigh in on the biggest restaurant trends they predict to find in a post-COVID-19 world.

Special occasion dining

“When we do dine in, it will be memorable. More exclusive types of dining experiences in the dining room—think tasting menus, private dining experiences that go above and beyond with ingredients and access. People will go out for a truly memorable dining experience where they feel safe and can expect an experience unlike anything they’ve had before.”— JoJo Ruiz, executive chef at Serea Coastal Cuisine and Lionfish in San Diego

"With all the cooking at home going on during the COVID-19 pandemic, dining out is starting to feel super special occasion again—tasting menus with wine pairings are a fun step in the opposite direction." — Cassidee Dabney, executive chef of The Barn at Blackberry Farm in Tennessee

“In response to all that has happened this year, I believe next year will bring two polarizing approaches to dining. One that embraces the need for simpler, comforting and soul-nourishing cuisine and the other that functions as an escape and embraces frivolousness𠅊llowing patrons to be both fancy and indulgent.” — Gemma Kamin-Korn, chef of Bar Beau in Williamsburg, New York

Deeper dives into Black foodways

“I believe that folks are taking more interest in the African diaspora and specifically what African-American foodways are in the scope of the American culinary market. I think we&aposll see a more focused conversation around ingredients like sweet potatoes and various greens or biscuits as they relate to Black folks and more specifically how they come from our agricultural and more agrarian roots. Families like the਌onyersꃺmily in Manning, South Carolina, growing heritage sweet potatoes come to mind, or Theꃊrter family of Philadelphia who have been growing watermelons and selling them on the corner of 84th and Lindbergh in Southwest Philadelphia for 50 years. Cybille and I served those very melons for the Black Labor Day pop up that we did on September 8th. I also think that there will be a rekindling under the fire of indigenous cuisines in America. Trends will be less "trendy" this year and more rooted as we look back on a year that has grounded many of us and brought our foundations and truths to the surface, in my opinion.” — Omar Tate, chef and founder of Honeysuckle Projects in Philadelphia

“I think the current state of the industry leaves the door wide open for more diverse voices and cultures from within the African Diaspora to thrive. We’ll see a lot more folks embracing the cultures that either aren’t often lauded in the mainstream or those that aren’t too concerned with the aesthetics of &aposperfect plating&apos and pretension. Instead, properly centered narratives and stories celebrating the roots, histories, and traditions of these cultures such as the cuisine of Haiti or that of the Fulani people will get the reverence they deserve. As a result of this I also think there’ll be an even stronger push in specialty products from these cultures being packaged and more readily available for anyone willing to experiment. Perhaps a small batch Haitian Epis might catch your eye on a grocery store shelf, or you might even purchase a specially crafted Yaji spice from an online vendor. Either way, we’ll certainly find more ways to celebrate and support the chefs and artisans dedicating their talents towards bringing more awareness and assertive acclaim to these cultures.” — Cybille St.Aude-Tate, chef of Earthseed Provisionsਊnd Honeysuckle Projects in Philadelphia

Individualized tasting menus

𠇊s diners feel more and more comfortable going out, the same old menus just won&apost cut it anymore. Dining out will really become something sought out for a unique experience. They want something created just for them, making it truly a reason to get out of the house and celebrate.” — Mariah Posadni, pastry chef of Common House Richmond in Virginia

“Small-group private dining will be hot. Restaurants that can provide safe, intimate spaces for small groups will be sought out at a premium.” — Ravi Kapur, chef and owner of Liholiho Yacht Clubਊnd򠷪r Inga in San Francisco

Heritage cooking

"I’m glad heritage cooking is trending, but it should be a trend that is here to stay. We (first-generation American chefs, immigrant chefs) didn’t &aposshow up&apos overnight and start cooking. The rise in recognition for immigrant cooking and heritage recipes has been a long time coming, and to be able to cook their families&apos food and to be showcased properly for it, is something first generation American chefs and immigrant chefs can celebrate. It’s high time these talented cooks get the spotlight they deserve and the spotlight on their cultures those vibrant cultures deserve. Overall, in the New Year, I expect people will start seeing cultures more holistically through food (e.g., Vietnamese food beyond banh mi and pho). When it comes to exposing diners to the new traditions—what it means to be Burmese-American, Filipino-American, Ethiopian-American, or Vietnamese-American—I look up to what chefs including Charles Phan, Tom Cunanan, and Andrea Nguyen have done for Filipino and Vietnamese chefs. They’ve opened a door to us being better represented this year and for the years to come." — Kevin Tien, chef of Moon Rabbit in Washington, DC

At-home restaurant experiences

“This year we, and many other restaurants across the globe, had to quickly pivot to expand into takeout and delivery, and I don&apost see that trend going away anytime soon. In 2021, it will evolve as chefs are creating new and interesting ways to bring the restaurant experience to life at home for guests. At our restaurants, paella became one of the most popular items on our to-go menu. The paella pan fit perfectly into a pizza box, while keeping the rice hot, so you had this element of presentation you&aposd get in the restaurant.” — Rick Billings, executive chef of José Andrés ThinkFoodGroup

"Restaurant-style meals packaged for the family will definitely keep trending in the year to come. Plant-based, healthy vegetarian dishes with seasonal ingredients and global flavor are here to stay in the future. Wonderfully curated meals with soul, taste, and creativity can be picked up at a favorite restaurant and ready on the table in a split second."  — Daniel Boulud, chef of Daniel, in New York City

𠇌hefs and restaurant owners will find a way to safely provide cool experiences in customers&apos homes. Some creative take-away options will emerge, and I’m hopeful that some risk-taking and more challenging concepts will trickle out towards the end of the year." — Evan Gaudreau, chef and owner of Post House in Charleston

“The biggest trend next year is going to (continue to) be how to be creative with to-go food. I think as much as I can about what I can do to make to-go dining more attractive to diners, whether it’s what we’re using for flatware and silverware or what we can do to appeal to a family for weeknight dinner, or a special &aposdate night&apos in.” — JoJo Ruiz

“It’s probably no surprise this year’s biggest trend (and likely next year’s as well) was to-go. Restaurants across the country, including fine-dining restaurants that rely heavily on presentation and overall experience, are having to pivot to provide these fantastic meals in guests’ homes. I don’t see this changing as we enter 2021.” — Gavin Fine, owner of Fine Dining Restaurant Group (opening a new concept in spring 2021 at The Cloudveil) in Jackson Hole, Wyoming

“In response to guests looking for more privatized experiences, we&aposre transforming our carryout options to include more whimsical and casual dishes that guests can enjoy at their leisure and in a place of their choosing.” — Chris Huerta, executive chef of Old Edwards Hospitality Group in Franklin, North Carolina

More virtual cooking classes

"Online, chef-driven virtual cooking classes—with accompanying chef food boxes for their recipes—will continue to expand in 2021. Many people will keep this fun way to get together with friends and family and be entertained at home while preparing a good meal and cooking along with a chef."— Daniel Boulud


These Will Be the 21 Biggest Food Trends of 2021, According to Chefs

Comfort food, condiments, and a joyful, over-the-top return to indoor dining.

Late last year, we talked to dozens of chefs who predicted trends that ranged from family-style dining to tasting menus with non-alcoholic juice pairings. Of course, no one could have predicted the way 2020 played outthough San Francisco chef Angela Pinkerton did anticipate we𠆝 be eating more bread.

As we close out a year that’s brought upheaval and devastation to an industry we love so much, we revisited the conversation to try to imagine, with a little more humility, what next year might bring. Below, chefs weigh in on the biggest restaurant trends they predict to find in a post-COVID-19 world.

Special occasion dining

“When we do dine in, it will be memorable. More exclusive types of dining experiences in the dining room—think tasting menus, private dining experiences that go above and beyond with ingredients and access. People will go out for a truly memorable dining experience where they feel safe and can expect an experience unlike anything they’ve had before.”— JoJo Ruiz, executive chef at Serea Coastal Cuisine and Lionfish in San Diego

"With all the cooking at home going on during the COVID-19 pandemic, dining out is starting to feel super special occasion again—tasting menus with wine pairings are a fun step in the opposite direction." — Cassidee Dabney, executive chef of The Barn at Blackberry Farm in Tennessee

“In response to all that has happened this year, I believe next year will bring two polarizing approaches to dining. One that embraces the need for simpler, comforting and soul-nourishing cuisine and the other that functions as an escape and embraces frivolousness𠅊llowing patrons to be both fancy and indulgent.” — Gemma Kamin-Korn, chef of Bar Beau in Williamsburg, New York

Deeper dives into Black foodways

“I believe that folks are taking more interest in the African diaspora and specifically what African-American foodways are in the scope of the American culinary market. I think we&aposll see a more focused conversation around ingredients like sweet potatoes and various greens or biscuits as they relate to Black folks and more specifically how they come from our agricultural and more agrarian roots. Families like the਌onyersꃺmily in Manning, South Carolina, growing heritage sweet potatoes come to mind, or Theꃊrter family of Philadelphia who have been growing watermelons and selling them on the corner of 84th and Lindbergh in Southwest Philadelphia for 50 years. Cybille and I served those very melons for the Black Labor Day pop up that we did on September 8th. I also think that there will be a rekindling under the fire of indigenous cuisines in America. Trends will be less "trendy" this year and more rooted as we look back on a year that has grounded many of us and brought our foundations and truths to the surface, in my opinion.” — Omar Tate, chef and founder of Honeysuckle Projects in Philadelphia

“I think the current state of the industry leaves the door wide open for more diverse voices and cultures from within the African Diaspora to thrive. We’ll see a lot more folks embracing the cultures that either aren’t often lauded in the mainstream or those that aren’t too concerned with the aesthetics of &aposperfect plating&apos and pretension. Instead, properly centered narratives and stories celebrating the roots, histories, and traditions of these cultures such as the cuisine of Haiti or that of the Fulani people will get the reverence they deserve. As a result of this I also think there’ll be an even stronger push in specialty products from these cultures being packaged and more readily available for anyone willing to experiment. Perhaps a small batch Haitian Epis might catch your eye on a grocery store shelf, or you might even purchase a specially crafted Yaji spice from an online vendor. Either way, we’ll certainly find more ways to celebrate and support the chefs and artisans dedicating their talents towards bringing more awareness and assertive acclaim to these cultures.” — Cybille St.Aude-Tate, chef of Earthseed Provisionsਊnd Honeysuckle Projects in Philadelphia

Individualized tasting menus

𠇊s diners feel more and more comfortable going out, the same old menus just won&apost cut it anymore. Dining out will really become something sought out for a unique experience. They want something created just for them, making it truly a reason to get out of the house and celebrate.” — Mariah Posadni, pastry chef of Common House Richmond in Virginia

“Small-group private dining will be hot. Restaurants that can provide safe, intimate spaces for small groups will be sought out at a premium.” — Ravi Kapur, chef and owner of Liholiho Yacht Clubਊnd򠷪r Inga in San Francisco

Heritage cooking

"I’m glad heritage cooking is trending, but it should be a trend that is here to stay. We (first-generation American chefs, immigrant chefs) didn’t &aposshow up&apos overnight and start cooking. The rise in recognition for immigrant cooking and heritage recipes has been a long time coming, and to be able to cook their families&apos food and to be showcased properly for it, is something first generation American chefs and immigrant chefs can celebrate. It’s high time these talented cooks get the spotlight they deserve and the spotlight on their cultures those vibrant cultures deserve. Overall, in the New Year, I expect people will start seeing cultures more holistically through food (e.g., Vietnamese food beyond banh mi and pho). When it comes to exposing diners to the new traditions—what it means to be Burmese-American, Filipino-American, Ethiopian-American, or Vietnamese-American—I look up to what chefs including Charles Phan, Tom Cunanan, and Andrea Nguyen have done for Filipino and Vietnamese chefs. They’ve opened a door to us being better represented this year and for the years to come." — Kevin Tien, chef of Moon Rabbit in Washington, DC

At-home restaurant experiences

“This year we, and many other restaurants across the globe, had to quickly pivot to expand into takeout and delivery, and I don&apost see that trend going away anytime soon. In 2021, it will evolve as chefs are creating new and interesting ways to bring the restaurant experience to life at home for guests. At our restaurants, paella became one of the most popular items on our to-go menu. The paella pan fit perfectly into a pizza box, while keeping the rice hot, so you had this element of presentation you&aposd get in the restaurant.” — Rick Billings, executive chef of José Andrés ThinkFoodGroup

"Restaurant-style meals packaged for the family will definitely keep trending in the year to come. Plant-based, healthy vegetarian dishes with seasonal ingredients and global flavor are here to stay in the future. Wonderfully curated meals with soul, taste, and creativity can be picked up at a favorite restaurant and ready on the table in a split second."  — Daniel Boulud, chef of Daniel, in New York City

𠇌hefs and restaurant owners will find a way to safely provide cool experiences in customers&apos homes. Some creative take-away options will emerge, and I’m hopeful that some risk-taking and more challenging concepts will trickle out towards the end of the year." — Evan Gaudreau, chef and owner of Post House in Charleston

“The biggest trend next year is going to (continue to) be how to be creative with to-go food. I think as much as I can about what I can do to make to-go dining more attractive to diners, whether it’s what we’re using for flatware and silverware or what we can do to appeal to a family for weeknight dinner, or a special &aposdate night&apos in.” — JoJo Ruiz

“It’s probably no surprise this year’s biggest trend (and likely next year’s as well) was to-go. Restaurants across the country, including fine-dining restaurants that rely heavily on presentation and overall experience, are having to pivot to provide these fantastic meals in guests’ homes. I don’t see this changing as we enter 2021.” — Gavin Fine, owner of Fine Dining Restaurant Group (opening a new concept in spring 2021 at The Cloudveil) in Jackson Hole, Wyoming

“In response to guests looking for more privatized experiences, we&aposre transforming our carryout options to include more whimsical and casual dishes that guests can enjoy at their leisure and in a place of their choosing.” — Chris Huerta, executive chef of Old Edwards Hospitality Group in Franklin, North Carolina

More virtual cooking classes

"Online, chef-driven virtual cooking classes—with accompanying chef food boxes for their recipes—will continue to expand in 2021. Many people will keep this fun way to get together with friends and family and be entertained at home while preparing a good meal and cooking along with a chef."— Daniel Boulud


These Will Be the 21 Biggest Food Trends of 2021, According to Chefs

Comfort food, condiments, and a joyful, over-the-top return to indoor dining.

Late last year, we talked to dozens of chefs who predicted trends that ranged from family-style dining to tasting menus with non-alcoholic juice pairings. Of course, no one could have predicted the way 2020 played outthough San Francisco chef Angela Pinkerton did anticipate we𠆝 be eating more bread.

As we close out a year that’s brought upheaval and devastation to an industry we love so much, we revisited the conversation to try to imagine, with a little more humility, what next year might bring. Below, chefs weigh in on the biggest restaurant trends they predict to find in a post-COVID-19 world.

Special occasion dining

“When we do dine in, it will be memorable. More exclusive types of dining experiences in the dining room—think tasting menus, private dining experiences that go above and beyond with ingredients and access. People will go out for a truly memorable dining experience where they feel safe and can expect an experience unlike anything they’ve had before.”— JoJo Ruiz, executive chef at Serea Coastal Cuisine and Lionfish in San Diego

"With all the cooking at home going on during the COVID-19 pandemic, dining out is starting to feel super special occasion again—tasting menus with wine pairings are a fun step in the opposite direction." — Cassidee Dabney, executive chef of The Barn at Blackberry Farm in Tennessee

“In response to all that has happened this year, I believe next year will bring two polarizing approaches to dining. One that embraces the need for simpler, comforting and soul-nourishing cuisine and the other that functions as an escape and embraces frivolousness𠅊llowing patrons to be both fancy and indulgent.” — Gemma Kamin-Korn, chef of Bar Beau in Williamsburg, New York

Deeper dives into Black foodways

“I believe that folks are taking more interest in the African diaspora and specifically what African-American foodways are in the scope of the American culinary market. I think we&aposll see a more focused conversation around ingredients like sweet potatoes and various greens or biscuits as they relate to Black folks and more specifically how they come from our agricultural and more agrarian roots. Families like the਌onyersꃺmily in Manning, South Carolina, growing heritage sweet potatoes come to mind, or Theꃊrter family of Philadelphia who have been growing watermelons and selling them on the corner of 84th and Lindbergh in Southwest Philadelphia for 50 years. Cybille and I served those very melons for the Black Labor Day pop up that we did on September 8th. I also think that there will be a rekindling under the fire of indigenous cuisines in America. Trends will be less "trendy" this year and more rooted as we look back on a year that has grounded many of us and brought our foundations and truths to the surface, in my opinion.” — Omar Tate, chef and founder of Honeysuckle Projects in Philadelphia

“I think the current state of the industry leaves the door wide open for more diverse voices and cultures from within the African Diaspora to thrive. We’ll see a lot more folks embracing the cultures that either aren’t often lauded in the mainstream or those that aren’t too concerned with the aesthetics of &aposperfect plating&apos and pretension. Instead, properly centered narratives and stories celebrating the roots, histories, and traditions of these cultures such as the cuisine of Haiti or that of the Fulani people will get the reverence they deserve. As a result of this I also think there’ll be an even stronger push in specialty products from these cultures being packaged and more readily available for anyone willing to experiment. Perhaps a small batch Haitian Epis might catch your eye on a grocery store shelf, or you might even purchase a specially crafted Yaji spice from an online vendor. Either way, we’ll certainly find more ways to celebrate and support the chefs and artisans dedicating their talents towards bringing more awareness and assertive acclaim to these cultures.” — Cybille St.Aude-Tate, chef of Earthseed Provisionsਊnd Honeysuckle Projects in Philadelphia

Individualized tasting menus

𠇊s diners feel more and more comfortable going out, the same old menus just won&apost cut it anymore. Dining out will really become something sought out for a unique experience. They want something created just for them, making it truly a reason to get out of the house and celebrate.” — Mariah Posadni, pastry chef of Common House Richmond in Virginia

“Small-group private dining will be hot. Restaurants that can provide safe, intimate spaces for small groups will be sought out at a premium.” — Ravi Kapur, chef and owner of Liholiho Yacht Clubਊnd򠷪r Inga in San Francisco

Heritage cooking

"I’m glad heritage cooking is trending, but it should be a trend that is here to stay. We (first-generation American chefs, immigrant chefs) didn’t &aposshow up&apos overnight and start cooking. The rise in recognition for immigrant cooking and heritage recipes has been a long time coming, and to be able to cook their families&apos food and to be showcased properly for it, is something first generation American chefs and immigrant chefs can celebrate. It’s high time these talented cooks get the spotlight they deserve and the spotlight on their cultures those vibrant cultures deserve. Overall, in the New Year, I expect people will start seeing cultures more holistically through food (e.g., Vietnamese food beyond banh mi and pho). When it comes to exposing diners to the new traditions—what it means to be Burmese-American, Filipino-American, Ethiopian-American, or Vietnamese-American—I look up to what chefs including Charles Phan, Tom Cunanan, and Andrea Nguyen have done for Filipino and Vietnamese chefs. They’ve opened a door to us being better represented this year and for the years to come." — Kevin Tien, chef of Moon Rabbit in Washington, DC

At-home restaurant experiences

“This year we, and many other restaurants across the globe, had to quickly pivot to expand into takeout and delivery, and I don&apost see that trend going away anytime soon. In 2021, it will evolve as chefs are creating new and interesting ways to bring the restaurant experience to life at home for guests. At our restaurants, paella became one of the most popular items on our to-go menu. The paella pan fit perfectly into a pizza box, while keeping the rice hot, so you had this element of presentation you&aposd get in the restaurant.” — Rick Billings, executive chef of José Andrés ThinkFoodGroup

"Restaurant-style meals packaged for the family will definitely keep trending in the year to come. Plant-based, healthy vegetarian dishes with seasonal ingredients and global flavor are here to stay in the future. Wonderfully curated meals with soul, taste, and creativity can be picked up at a favorite restaurant and ready on the table in a split second."  — Daniel Boulud, chef of Daniel, in New York City

𠇌hefs and restaurant owners will find a way to safely provide cool experiences in customers&apos homes. Some creative take-away options will emerge, and I’m hopeful that some risk-taking and more challenging concepts will trickle out towards the end of the year." — Evan Gaudreau, chef and owner of Post House in Charleston

“The biggest trend next year is going to (continue to) be how to be creative with to-go food. I think as much as I can about what I can do to make to-go dining more attractive to diners, whether it’s what we’re using for flatware and silverware or what we can do to appeal to a family for weeknight dinner, or a special &aposdate night&apos in.” — JoJo Ruiz

“It’s probably no surprise this year’s biggest trend (and likely next year’s as well) was to-go. Restaurants across the country, including fine-dining restaurants that rely heavily on presentation and overall experience, are having to pivot to provide these fantastic meals in guests’ homes. I don’t see this changing as we enter 2021.” — Gavin Fine, owner of Fine Dining Restaurant Group (opening a new concept in spring 2021 at The Cloudveil) in Jackson Hole, Wyoming

“In response to guests looking for more privatized experiences, we&aposre transforming our carryout options to include more whimsical and casual dishes that guests can enjoy at their leisure and in a place of their choosing.” — Chris Huerta, executive chef of Old Edwards Hospitality Group in Franklin, North Carolina

More virtual cooking classes

"Online, chef-driven virtual cooking classes—with accompanying chef food boxes for their recipes—will continue to expand in 2021. Many people will keep this fun way to get together with friends and family and be entertained at home while preparing a good meal and cooking along with a chef."— Daniel Boulud


These Will Be the 21 Biggest Food Trends of 2021, According to Chefs

Comfort food, condiments, and a joyful, over-the-top return to indoor dining.

Late last year, we talked to dozens of chefs who predicted trends that ranged from family-style dining to tasting menus with non-alcoholic juice pairings. Of course, no one could have predicted the way 2020 played outthough San Francisco chef Angela Pinkerton did anticipate we𠆝 be eating more bread.

As we close out a year that’s brought upheaval and devastation to an industry we love so much, we revisited the conversation to try to imagine, with a little more humility, what next year might bring. Below, chefs weigh in on the biggest restaurant trends they predict to find in a post-COVID-19 world.

Special occasion dining

“When we do dine in, it will be memorable. More exclusive types of dining experiences in the dining room—think tasting menus, private dining experiences that go above and beyond with ingredients and access. People will go out for a truly memorable dining experience where they feel safe and can expect an experience unlike anything they’ve had before.”— JoJo Ruiz, executive chef at Serea Coastal Cuisine and Lionfish in San Diego

"With all the cooking at home going on during the COVID-19 pandemic, dining out is starting to feel super special occasion again—tasting menus with wine pairings are a fun step in the opposite direction." — Cassidee Dabney, executive chef of The Barn at Blackberry Farm in Tennessee

“In response to all that has happened this year, I believe next year will bring two polarizing approaches to dining. One that embraces the need for simpler, comforting and soul-nourishing cuisine and the other that functions as an escape and embraces frivolousness𠅊llowing patrons to be both fancy and indulgent.” — Gemma Kamin-Korn, chef of Bar Beau in Williamsburg, New York

Deeper dives into Black foodways

“I believe that folks are taking more interest in the African diaspora and specifically what African-American foodways are in the scope of the American culinary market. I think we&aposll see a more focused conversation around ingredients like sweet potatoes and various greens or biscuits as they relate to Black folks and more specifically how they come from our agricultural and more agrarian roots. Families like the਌onyersꃺmily in Manning, South Carolina, growing heritage sweet potatoes come to mind, or Theꃊrter family of Philadelphia who have been growing watermelons and selling them on the corner of 84th and Lindbergh in Southwest Philadelphia for 50 years. Cybille and I served those very melons for the Black Labor Day pop up that we did on September 8th. I also think that there will be a rekindling under the fire of indigenous cuisines in America. Trends will be less "trendy" this year and more rooted as we look back on a year that has grounded many of us and brought our foundations and truths to the surface, in my opinion.” — Omar Tate, chef and founder of Honeysuckle Projects in Philadelphia

“I think the current state of the industry leaves the door wide open for more diverse voices and cultures from within the African Diaspora to thrive. We’ll see a lot more folks embracing the cultures that either aren’t often lauded in the mainstream or those that aren’t too concerned with the aesthetics of &aposperfect plating&apos and pretension. Instead, properly centered narratives and stories celebrating the roots, histories, and traditions of these cultures such as the cuisine of Haiti or that of the Fulani people will get the reverence they deserve. As a result of this I also think there’ll be an even stronger push in specialty products from these cultures being packaged and more readily available for anyone willing to experiment. Perhaps a small batch Haitian Epis might catch your eye on a grocery store shelf, or you might even purchase a specially crafted Yaji spice from an online vendor. Either way, we’ll certainly find more ways to celebrate and support the chefs and artisans dedicating their talents towards bringing more awareness and assertive acclaim to these cultures.” — Cybille St.Aude-Tate, chef of Earthseed Provisionsਊnd Honeysuckle Projects in Philadelphia

Individualized tasting menus

𠇊s diners feel more and more comfortable going out, the same old menus just won&apost cut it anymore. Dining out will really become something sought out for a unique experience. They want something created just for them, making it truly a reason to get out of the house and celebrate.” — Mariah Posadni, pastry chef of Common House Richmond in Virginia

“Small-group private dining will be hot. Restaurants that can provide safe, intimate spaces for small groups will be sought out at a premium.” — Ravi Kapur, chef and owner of Liholiho Yacht Clubਊnd򠷪r Inga in San Francisco

Heritage cooking

"I’m glad heritage cooking is trending, but it should be a trend that is here to stay. We (first-generation American chefs, immigrant chefs) didn’t &aposshow up&apos overnight and start cooking. The rise in recognition for immigrant cooking and heritage recipes has been a long time coming, and to be able to cook their families&apos food and to be showcased properly for it, is something first generation American chefs and immigrant chefs can celebrate. It’s high time these talented cooks get the spotlight they deserve and the spotlight on their cultures those vibrant cultures deserve. Overall, in the New Year, I expect people will start seeing cultures more holistically through food (e.g., Vietnamese food beyond banh mi and pho). When it comes to exposing diners to the new traditions—what it means to be Burmese-American, Filipino-American, Ethiopian-American, or Vietnamese-American—I look up to what chefs including Charles Phan, Tom Cunanan, and Andrea Nguyen have done for Filipino and Vietnamese chefs. They’ve opened a door to us being better represented this year and for the years to come." — Kevin Tien, chef of Moon Rabbit in Washington, DC

At-home restaurant experiences

“This year we, and many other restaurants across the globe, had to quickly pivot to expand into takeout and delivery, and I don&apost see that trend going away anytime soon. In 2021, it will evolve as chefs are creating new and interesting ways to bring the restaurant experience to life at home for guests. At our restaurants, paella became one of the most popular items on our to-go menu. The paella pan fit perfectly into a pizza box, while keeping the rice hot, so you had this element of presentation you&aposd get in the restaurant.” — Rick Billings, executive chef of José Andrés ThinkFoodGroup

"Restaurant-style meals packaged for the family will definitely keep trending in the year to come. Plant-based, healthy vegetarian dishes with seasonal ingredients and global flavor are here to stay in the future. Wonderfully curated meals with soul, taste, and creativity can be picked up at a favorite restaurant and ready on the table in a split second."  — Daniel Boulud, chef of Daniel, in New York City

𠇌hefs and restaurant owners will find a way to safely provide cool experiences in customers&apos homes. Some creative take-away options will emerge, and I’m hopeful that some risk-taking and more challenging concepts will trickle out towards the end of the year." — Evan Gaudreau, chef and owner of Post House in Charleston

“The biggest trend next year is going to (continue to) be how to be creative with to-go food. I think as much as I can about what I can do to make to-go dining more attractive to diners, whether it’s what we’re using for flatware and silverware or what we can do to appeal to a family for weeknight dinner, or a special &aposdate night&apos in.” — JoJo Ruiz

“It’s probably no surprise this year’s biggest trend (and likely next year’s as well) was to-go. Restaurants across the country, including fine-dining restaurants that rely heavily on presentation and overall experience, are having to pivot to provide these fantastic meals in guests’ homes. I don’t see this changing as we enter 2021.” — Gavin Fine, owner of Fine Dining Restaurant Group (opening a new concept in spring 2021 at The Cloudveil) in Jackson Hole, Wyoming

“In response to guests looking for more privatized experiences, we&aposre transforming our carryout options to include more whimsical and casual dishes that guests can enjoy at their leisure and in a place of their choosing.” — Chris Huerta, executive chef of Old Edwards Hospitality Group in Franklin, North Carolina

More virtual cooking classes

"Online, chef-driven virtual cooking classes—with accompanying chef food boxes for their recipes—will continue to expand in 2021. Many people will keep this fun way to get together with friends and family and be entertained at home while preparing a good meal and cooking along with a chef."— Daniel Boulud


These Will Be the 21 Biggest Food Trends of 2021, According to Chefs

Comfort food, condiments, and a joyful, over-the-top return to indoor dining.

Late last year, we talked to dozens of chefs who predicted trends that ranged from family-style dining to tasting menus with non-alcoholic juice pairings. Of course, no one could have predicted the way 2020 played outthough San Francisco chef Angela Pinkerton did anticipate we𠆝 be eating more bread.

As we close out a year that’s brought upheaval and devastation to an industry we love so much, we revisited the conversation to try to imagine, with a little more humility, what next year might bring. Below, chefs weigh in on the biggest restaurant trends they predict to find in a post-COVID-19 world.

Special occasion dining

“When we do dine in, it will be memorable. More exclusive types of dining experiences in the dining room—think tasting menus, private dining experiences that go above and beyond with ingredients and access. People will go out for a truly memorable dining experience where they feel safe and can expect an experience unlike anything they’ve had before.”— JoJo Ruiz, executive chef at Serea Coastal Cuisine and Lionfish in San Diego

"With all the cooking at home going on during the COVID-19 pandemic, dining out is starting to feel super special occasion again—tasting menus with wine pairings are a fun step in the opposite direction." — Cassidee Dabney, executive chef of The Barn at Blackberry Farm in Tennessee

“In response to all that has happened this year, I believe next year will bring two polarizing approaches to dining. One that embraces the need for simpler, comforting and soul-nourishing cuisine and the other that functions as an escape and embraces frivolousness𠅊llowing patrons to be both fancy and indulgent.” — Gemma Kamin-Korn, chef of Bar Beau in Williamsburg, New York

Deeper dives into Black foodways

“I believe that folks are taking more interest in the African diaspora and specifically what African-American foodways are in the scope of the American culinary market. I think we&aposll see a more focused conversation around ingredients like sweet potatoes and various greens or biscuits as they relate to Black folks and more specifically how they come from our agricultural and more agrarian roots. Families like the਌onyersꃺmily in Manning, South Carolina, growing heritage sweet potatoes come to mind, or Theꃊrter family of Philadelphia who have been growing watermelons and selling them on the corner of 84th and Lindbergh in Southwest Philadelphia for 50 years. Cybille and I served those very melons for the Black Labor Day pop up that we did on September 8th. I also think that there will be a rekindling under the fire of indigenous cuisines in America. Trends will be less "trendy" this year and more rooted as we look back on a year that has grounded many of us and brought our foundations and truths to the surface, in my opinion.” — Omar Tate, chef and founder of Honeysuckle Projects in Philadelphia

“I think the current state of the industry leaves the door wide open for more diverse voices and cultures from within the African Diaspora to thrive. We’ll see a lot more folks embracing the cultures that either aren’t often lauded in the mainstream or those that aren’t too concerned with the aesthetics of &aposperfect plating&apos and pretension. Instead, properly centered narratives and stories celebrating the roots, histories, and traditions of these cultures such as the cuisine of Haiti or that of the Fulani people will get the reverence they deserve. As a result of this I also think there’ll be an even stronger push in specialty products from these cultures being packaged and more readily available for anyone willing to experiment. Perhaps a small batch Haitian Epis might catch your eye on a grocery store shelf, or you might even purchase a specially crafted Yaji spice from an online vendor. Either way, we’ll certainly find more ways to celebrate and support the chefs and artisans dedicating their talents towards bringing more awareness and assertive acclaim to these cultures.” — Cybille St.Aude-Tate, chef of Earthseed Provisionsਊnd Honeysuckle Projects in Philadelphia

Individualized tasting menus

𠇊s diners feel more and more comfortable going out, the same old menus just won&apost cut it anymore. Dining out will really become something sought out for a unique experience. They want something created just for them, making it truly a reason to get out of the house and celebrate.” — Mariah Posadni, pastry chef of Common House Richmond in Virginia

“Small-group private dining will be hot. Restaurants that can provide safe, intimate spaces for small groups will be sought out at a premium.” — Ravi Kapur, chef and owner of Liholiho Yacht Clubਊnd򠷪r Inga in San Francisco

Heritage cooking

"I’m glad heritage cooking is trending, but it should be a trend that is here to stay. We (first-generation American chefs, immigrant chefs) didn’t &aposshow up&apos overnight and start cooking. The rise in recognition for immigrant cooking and heritage recipes has been a long time coming, and to be able to cook their families&apos food and to be showcased properly for it, is something first generation American chefs and immigrant chefs can celebrate. It’s high time these talented cooks get the spotlight they deserve and the spotlight on their cultures those vibrant cultures deserve. Overall, in the New Year, I expect people will start seeing cultures more holistically through food (e.g., Vietnamese food beyond banh mi and pho). When it comes to exposing diners to the new traditions—what it means to be Burmese-American, Filipino-American, Ethiopian-American, or Vietnamese-American—I look up to what chefs including Charles Phan, Tom Cunanan, and Andrea Nguyen have done for Filipino and Vietnamese chefs. They’ve opened a door to us being better represented this year and for the years to come." — Kevin Tien, chef of Moon Rabbit in Washington, DC

At-home restaurant experiences

“This year we, and many other restaurants across the globe, had to quickly pivot to expand into takeout and delivery, and I don&apost see that trend going away anytime soon. In 2021, it will evolve as chefs are creating new and interesting ways to bring the restaurant experience to life at home for guests. At our restaurants, paella became one of the most popular items on our to-go menu. The paella pan fit perfectly into a pizza box, while keeping the rice hot, so you had this element of presentation you&aposd get in the restaurant.” — Rick Billings, executive chef of José Andrés ThinkFoodGroup

"Restaurant-style meals packaged for the family will definitely keep trending in the year to come. Plant-based, healthy vegetarian dishes with seasonal ingredients and global flavor are here to stay in the future. Wonderfully curated meals with soul, taste, and creativity can be picked up at a favorite restaurant and ready on the table in a split second."  — Daniel Boulud, chef of Daniel, in New York City

𠇌hefs and restaurant owners will find a way to safely provide cool experiences in customers&apos homes. Some creative take-away options will emerge, and I’m hopeful that some risk-taking and more challenging concepts will trickle out towards the end of the year." — Evan Gaudreau, chef and owner of Post House in Charleston

“The biggest trend next year is going to (continue to) be how to be creative with to-go food. I think as much as I can about what I can do to make to-go dining more attractive to diners, whether it’s what we’re using for flatware and silverware or what we can do to appeal to a family for weeknight dinner, or a special &aposdate night&apos in.” — JoJo Ruiz

“It’s probably no surprise this year’s biggest trend (and likely next year’s as well) was to-go. Restaurants across the country, including fine-dining restaurants that rely heavily on presentation and overall experience, are having to pivot to provide these fantastic meals in guests’ homes. I don’t see this changing as we enter 2021.” — Gavin Fine, owner of Fine Dining Restaurant Group (opening a new concept in spring 2021 at The Cloudveil) in Jackson Hole, Wyoming

“In response to guests looking for more privatized experiences, we&aposre transforming our carryout options to include more whimsical and casual dishes that guests can enjoy at their leisure and in a place of their choosing.” — Chris Huerta, executive chef of Old Edwards Hospitality Group in Franklin, North Carolina

More virtual cooking classes

"Online, chef-driven virtual cooking classes—with accompanying chef food boxes for their recipes—will continue to expand in 2021. Many people will keep this fun way to get together with friends and family and be entertained at home while preparing a good meal and cooking along with a chef."— Daniel Boulud


These Will Be the 21 Biggest Food Trends of 2021, According to Chefs

Comfort food, condiments, and a joyful, over-the-top return to indoor dining.

Late last year, we talked to dozens of chefs who predicted trends that ranged from family-style dining to tasting menus with non-alcoholic juice pairings. Of course, no one could have predicted the way 2020 played outthough San Francisco chef Angela Pinkerton did anticipate we𠆝 be eating more bread.

As we close out a year that’s brought upheaval and devastation to an industry we love so much, we revisited the conversation to try to imagine, with a little more humility, what next year might bring. Below, chefs weigh in on the biggest restaurant trends they predict to find in a post-COVID-19 world.

Special occasion dining

“When we do dine in, it will be memorable. More exclusive types of dining experiences in the dining room—think tasting menus, private dining experiences that go above and beyond with ingredients and access. People will go out for a truly memorable dining experience where they feel safe and can expect an experience unlike anything they’ve had before.”— JoJo Ruiz, executive chef at Serea Coastal Cuisine and Lionfish in San Diego

"With all the cooking at home going on during the COVID-19 pandemic, dining out is starting to feel super special occasion again—tasting menus with wine pairings are a fun step in the opposite direction." — Cassidee Dabney, executive chef of The Barn at Blackberry Farm in Tennessee

“In response to all that has happened this year, I believe next year will bring two polarizing approaches to dining. One that embraces the need for simpler, comforting and soul-nourishing cuisine and the other that functions as an escape and embraces frivolousness𠅊llowing patrons to be both fancy and indulgent.” — Gemma Kamin-Korn, chef of Bar Beau in Williamsburg, New York

Deeper dives into Black foodways

“I believe that folks are taking more interest in the African diaspora and specifically what African-American foodways are in the scope of the American culinary market. I think we&aposll see a more focused conversation around ingredients like sweet potatoes and various greens or biscuits as they relate to Black folks and more specifically how they come from our agricultural and more agrarian roots. Families like the਌onyersꃺmily in Manning, South Carolina, growing heritage sweet potatoes come to mind, or Theꃊrter family of Philadelphia who have been growing watermelons and selling them on the corner of 84th and Lindbergh in Southwest Philadelphia for 50 years. Cybille and I served those very melons for the Black Labor Day pop up that we did on September 8th. I also think that there will be a rekindling under the fire of indigenous cuisines in America. Trends will be less "trendy" this year and more rooted as we look back on a year that has grounded many of us and brought our foundations and truths to the surface, in my opinion.” — Omar Tate, chef and founder of Honeysuckle Projects in Philadelphia

“I think the current state of the industry leaves the door wide open for more diverse voices and cultures from within the African Diaspora to thrive. We’ll see a lot more folks embracing the cultures that either aren’t often lauded in the mainstream or those that aren’t too concerned with the aesthetics of &aposperfect plating&apos and pretension. Instead, properly centered narratives and stories celebrating the roots, histories, and traditions of these cultures such as the cuisine of Haiti or that of the Fulani people will get the reverence they deserve. As a result of this I also think there’ll be an even stronger push in specialty products from these cultures being packaged and more readily available for anyone willing to experiment. Perhaps a small batch Haitian Epis might catch your eye on a grocery store shelf, or you might even purchase a specially crafted Yaji spice from an online vendor. Either way, we’ll certainly find more ways to celebrate and support the chefs and artisans dedicating their talents towards bringing more awareness and assertive acclaim to these cultures.” — Cybille St.Aude-Tate, chef of Earthseed Provisionsਊnd Honeysuckle Projects in Philadelphia

Individualized tasting menus

𠇊s diners feel more and more comfortable going out, the same old menus just won&apost cut it anymore. Dining out will really become something sought out for a unique experience. They want something created just for them, making it truly a reason to get out of the house and celebrate.” — Mariah Posadni, pastry chef of Common House Richmond in Virginia

“Small-group private dining will be hot. Restaurants that can provide safe, intimate spaces for small groups will be sought out at a premium.” — Ravi Kapur, chef and owner of Liholiho Yacht Clubਊnd򠷪r Inga in San Francisco

Heritage cooking

"I’m glad heritage cooking is trending, but it should be a trend that is here to stay. We (first-generation American chefs, immigrant chefs) didn’t &aposshow up&apos overnight and start cooking. The rise in recognition for immigrant cooking and heritage recipes has been a long time coming, and to be able to cook their families&apos food and to be showcased properly for it, is something first generation American chefs and immigrant chefs can celebrate. It’s high time these talented cooks get the spotlight they deserve and the spotlight on their cultures those vibrant cultures deserve. Overall, in the New Year, I expect people will start seeing cultures more holistically through food (e.g., Vietnamese food beyond banh mi and pho). When it comes to exposing diners to the new traditions—what it means to be Burmese-American, Filipino-American, Ethiopian-American, or Vietnamese-American—I look up to what chefs including Charles Phan, Tom Cunanan, and Andrea Nguyen have done for Filipino and Vietnamese chefs. They’ve opened a door to us being better represented this year and for the years to come." — Kevin Tien, chef of Moon Rabbit in Washington, DC

At-home restaurant experiences

“This year we, and many other restaurants across the globe, had to quickly pivot to expand into takeout and delivery, and I don&apost see that trend going away anytime soon. In 2021, it will evolve as chefs are creating new and interesting ways to bring the restaurant experience to life at home for guests. At our restaurants, paella became one of the most popular items on our to-go menu. The paella pan fit perfectly into a pizza box, while keeping the rice hot, so you had this element of presentation you&aposd get in the restaurant.” — Rick Billings, executive chef of José Andrés ThinkFoodGroup

"Restaurant-style meals packaged for the family will definitely keep trending in the year to come. Plant-based, healthy vegetarian dishes with seasonal ingredients and global flavor are here to stay in the future. Wonderfully curated meals with soul, taste, and creativity can be picked up at a favorite restaurant and ready on the table in a split second."  — Daniel Boulud, chef of Daniel, in New York City

𠇌hefs and restaurant owners will find a way to safely provide cool experiences in customers&apos homes. Some creative take-away options will emerge, and I’m hopeful that some risk-taking and more challenging concepts will trickle out towards the end of the year." — Evan Gaudreau, chef and owner of Post House in Charleston

“The biggest trend next year is going to (continue to) be how to be creative with to-go food. I think as much as I can about what I can do to make to-go dining more attractive to diners, whether it’s what we’re using for flatware and silverware or what we can do to appeal to a family for weeknight dinner, or a special &aposdate night&apos in.” — JoJo Ruiz

“It’s probably no surprise this year’s biggest trend (and likely next year’s as well) was to-go. Restaurants across the country, including fine-dining restaurants that rely heavily on presentation and overall experience, are having to pivot to provide these fantastic meals in guests’ homes. I don’t see this changing as we enter 2021.” — Gavin Fine, owner of Fine Dining Restaurant Group (opening a new concept in spring 2021 at The Cloudveil) in Jackson Hole, Wyoming

“In response to guests looking for more privatized experiences, we&aposre transforming our carryout options to include more whimsical and casual dishes that guests can enjoy at their leisure and in a place of their choosing.” — Chris Huerta, executive chef of Old Edwards Hospitality Group in Franklin, North Carolina

More virtual cooking classes

"Online, chef-driven virtual cooking classes—with accompanying chef food boxes for their recipes—will continue to expand in 2021. Many people will keep this fun way to get together with friends and family and be entertained at home while preparing a good meal and cooking along with a chef."— Daniel Boulud


Watch the video: Sushi-Burger - neuer Food Trend? Galileo. ProSieben (July 2022).


Comments:

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  4. Shasho

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  5. Mezigor

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